Supported by:


Thursday, April 28, 2011

Push for aquaculture would reap benefits

Trinidad & Tobago: A stronger emphasis on aquaculture not only on tilapia but also other freshwater and marine fish species would help the domestic economy and exports, according to a local reporter. With the end of the Lenten season and its traditional heavy demand for fish, what strikes forcibly in the wake of this year's fish shortages is that a great deal more needs to be done for the fishing industry, according to Newsday of Trinidad and Tobago.

On the plus side, however, is the Minister of Food Production's recent advice of plans to assist several of the country's fishing villages as well as the developments of strategies aimed at helping the winning of larger catch. But as welcome as this may be, the question remains: is it enough? In the meantime, the suggestion of aquaculture as a complement or indeed, in some instances, a credible alternative to sea fishing should be examined closely. Read more ..

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Western Australian Shire seeks barra farm funds

The Western Australian wheat-belt Shire of Wagin hopes a plan for an aquaculture farm to help tackle salinity and generate its own power will gain government approval. The shire has applied for more than AUS$3 million (UK£1.797 million) in Federal Government grant money to fund the facility, which would use the town's saline groundwater for the inland barramundi farm. The farm would be integrated with a desalination unit and co-generation power station. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Costs, disease hurt shrimp breeders

Despite an increase in prices, shrimp breeders in the Cuu Long (Mekong) Delta are facing difficulties due to higher input costs and an outbreak of disease among their crops. The price of baby shrimp, feed and veterinary medicine as well as costs to improve breeding ponds have increased strongly over last year, pushing up production costs.

Each baby shrimp price, for instance, is VND10-15 higher than the previous year, while the feed price rose by thousands of dong a kilo. In addition, shrimp raised in many delta provinces, including Tra Vinh, Soc Trang, Bac Lieu and Kien Giang, have died in large numbers because of unseasonable rains earlier this month, creating heavy losses to farmers. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Vietnam: Tien Giang rejects fish cancer rumour

Tien Giang Rumours that eating square-head anabas causes cancer were untruthful, said deputy director of the Tien Giang Aquaculture Department Phan Huu Hoi. The rumours have caused great public concern in the southern province for the past 10 days, affecting the trade and consumption of the fish. Before the rumours appeared, prices of square-head anabas in the province were quite high, at about VND30,000-50,000 (US$1.5-2.5) a kilo.

However, after the rumours, the prices decreased sharply to about VND18,000-23,000 ($0.9-1.15), leaving the breeders having to shoulder major losses. This was not the first time such rumours had been spread, Hoi said. Before last Tet (Lunar New Year), rumours that grapefruit and durian could cause cancer appeared in the province, causing the fruit price to drop before a recent rebound, he said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

New department set up for Sea Lice research

Norway - Nofima and Tromsø Aquaculture Research Station have developed a new department for salmon lice research. This is an important contribution in the effort to combat the problems with salmon lice in the aquaculture industry. The department is located in a separate hall containing tanks where the scientists have full control of all relevant environment factors such as water, temperature, salt content, oxygen and feed.

All water is cleaned before it is pumped out again to avoid salmon lice being transferred to the surroundings. Nofima Senior Advisor, Heidi Mikalsen, explained: "We have established this department to meet the industry’s requirement for research that can contribute to getting rid of the lice problem. We have had a large influx of enquirers from commercial actors wanting to study and document how efficient treatments for salmon lice are." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Catfish processing down 37 percent from last year

US - Farm-raised catfish processed during March 2011 totaled 29.4 million pounds round weight, down 37 percent from March 2010. National Agricultural Statistics Service The average price paid to producers was US$1.07 (UK£0.641) per pound for March 2011, up 6.9 cents from last month and 28.7 cents above a year ago. Net pounds of processed fish sold during March 2011 totaled 17.6 million pounds, down 22 percent from the comparable month in 2010.

Sales of fresh fish, at 5.84 million pounds, were down 31 percent from March 2010 and represented 33 percent of total sales. Frozen fish sales, at 11.8 million pounds, were down 16 percent from a year ago and accounted for the remaining 67 percent of total fish sales. Sales of whole fish represented 19 percent of the total fish sold, fillets accounted for 57 percent, and the remaining 24 percent were mostly steaks, nuggets, and value added products. The total end of the month inventory decreased 32 percent from last month and was down 49 percent from a year ago. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Sustainable Pangasius production in Vietnam

Vietnam - Members of the Sustaining Ethical Aquaculture Trade (SEAT) project, met in Scotland recently to discuss the development of sustainable pangasius in Vietnam. They invited MEP and Senior Vice President of the European Parliament’s Fisheries Committee Struan Stevenson to increase his understanding on safety and sustainability of pangasius.

In November 2010 Struan Stevenson added to a raft of criticism in the media over Pangasius production in Vietnam and European imports of the finished product. His comments in the European Parliament raised concerns over safety standards of the finished product and welfare standards of those working in the industry. The Sustaining Ethical Aquaculture Trade (SEAT) project, led by the Institute of Aquaculture at Stirling University, is heavily involved in researching the burgeoning trade in pangasius from Vietnam. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

VIV sets world standard in animal protein production

VNU Exhibitions Europe says its shows set the world standard for top quality in innovative animal protein production. VNU Exhibitions Europe, part of Royal Dutch Jaarbeurs, is active organising trade shows in the field of intensive animal farming for many years and has achieved a high international standard with the exhibition brand, VIV.

The exhibition program of VIV typically includes companies active in feed milling and supplying feed milling equipment, animal feed and feed additives, animal health products, breeding and housing, meat products, meat processing, packaging and logistics and other services related to the animal protein production industry.

VIV started as a vertical trade fair meaning that the entire process, from feed milling equipment to genetic basic material to ready-made end products, is on display. Moreover, VIV expanded even further with the increasing demand for value-added products. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Fish project in China launched by AgriMarine

AgriMarine Holdings Inc, based in Vancouver, and the Zhoushan Fisheries Research Institute in the People's Republic of China (ZFRI), are pleased to announce a joint venture for a commercial scale research project for the rearing of yellow croaker in a closed containment system. The joint venture project is an important step for the Company as it advances its solid wall closed containment technology into other high value species in China.

Yellow croaker wild populations (called 'gold fish' in China) have declined since the 1970s and are now cultured in ocean net cages in the Fujian Province. These practices are contributing to pollution, disease and significant use of antibiotics, resulting in flesh quality issues. Previous research on the culture of yellow croaker using manufactured feeds has been conducted by the American Soya Association (ASA) in cooperation with the Ping Yang County Fisheries Bureau of Zhejiang Province. ASA will also provide advice on the feed formulation for the research conducted by AgriMarine and ZFRI. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Solid sustainability results from Cermaq

In its 2010 sustainability report published today, Cermaq says it has demonstrated sustainability through good production results based on preventive fish health measures with minor use of medicines and with zero escapes.

Cermaq has today presented its sustainability results for 2010. The company is a leader in farming of salmon and trout and production of feed for the same species. Cermaq demonstrates sustainability through good production results based on preventive fish health measures with minor use of medicines and with zero escapes. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Fish farm seeks to drift cages off Hawaii

Kona Blue Water Farms has applied for a permit to determine wether it would be possible to grow  young amberjack to harvest size in just 10 months in submerged cages tethered to surface bouys drifting freely on a circular ocean current off the big Island.

“This is one of the next steps that we have to do to grow more fish in an environmentally responsible manner, “he said. “ The whole world could benefit from this  Presently there are two ocean based farms operating in Hawaii. One is Kona Blue trading as Kona Kampachi and the other is Hukilau Foods. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Europe scorns "supersalmon" as GM battle widens

European salmon farmers and breeders who dominate global sales have a wary eye on transgenic American superfish that grow fast and might gulp part of the US$107 billion (UK£64.872 billion)-a-year aquaculture business. "We don't have any monster pigs in Europe, or monster cows, and there's no need for such a salmon," said Geir Isaksen, the chief executive at big Norwegian fish farmer Cermaq.

Genetically modified (GM) Atlantic salmon patented by US biotech firm AquaBounty are widely billed as growing at double speed and could be approved by US regulators as early as this summer, taking the global GM food fight to the fish counter.

"This is a safe and stable construct," AquaBounty CEO Ronald Stotish told Reuters, explaining how technicians inject Atlantic salmon eggs with genes from Pacific Chinook and bottom-dwelling ocean pout. The result three species in one, thus transgenic would be the first GM animal approved for human consumption, joining GM plants like soy and corn that have been altered to tolerate harsh herbicides. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Aquaculture may boost state agribusiness

To ramp up the automotive industry in Michigan, Henry Ford built the Rouge Plant a manufacturing infrastructure that could produce everything needed, from glass to steel, to make cars. Today, Russ Allen is looking for a way to build a shrimp Rouge Plant a pollution-free, recirculating facility that could breed, grow, process and ship a million pounds of shrimp a year.

Shrimp-growing system

It's not as far-fetched as it sounds. Allen, who spent 23 years establishing outdoor shrimp farming in Central and South America, has been raising shrimp indoors in Okemos since 1994 at his Seafood Systems research facility. He closely guards his proprietary technology from other companies and scientists around the world who also are racing to create the first successful, commercial-sized, indoor shrimp-growing system.

"This could be the start of an entirely new industry for Michigan, a clean industry, with new jobs," he said if he can find the US$10 million  (UK£6.079 million) he needs to build a commercial plant. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Cameroon: New fish development strategy in view

Cameroon's Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD) is carrying out research in view of putting at the disposal of fish farmers and donors a new development strategy that is expected to boost local production and bail the country out of incessant importation of fish. A two-day workshop to validate the research results, dubbed, "Research Strategy on Fish Culture Development in Cameroon" went underway in IRAD premises at Nkolbisson Yaounde yesterday April 25.

Speaking during the opening ceremony, the Director General of IRAD, Dr Jacob Mbua Ngueve said the study sought to develop methodology about the constraints to sustainable fish farming in the country.

"Cameroon imports a lot of fish irrespective of the potentials we have. Oceans, rivers are aplenty. Government has wanted to increase fish production and given that we cannot go and tell farmers to increase production without a strategy to guide them, there was need for a study", he said. The study, he added, is to come up with a strategy that will help farmers know exactly what they are supposed to do to increase production without destroying biodiversity. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Nutreco invests in upgrade of fish feed capacity in Norway

Nutreco is investing €27 million (US$39.579 million) to upgrade its fish feed plant in Averøy, Norway. The investment in the Averoy plant consists of an upgrade of the grinding facility, a new intake line and expansion of both storage capacity and operation premises. The investment will enable Skretting, Nutreco's fish feed business, to meet future market demand for high quality feed for salmon and to maintain its market leader position in Norway. The Norwegian fish feed market has grown with an average of eight percent a year from 2006 to 2010.

Growth of aquaculture

Knut Nesse, Nutreco's Chief Operating Officer Aquaculture: "This investment clearly demonstrates our commitment to support the growth of aquaculture in Norway and to maintain our market leader position in this fish feed market. Growth is expected to continue at a high rate in the coming years, especially in salmon feed. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Two locally-owned salmon farms sold to Norwegian operator

Two of the last Shetland owned salmon farms have been sold to the Norwegian fish farming giant Grieg Seafood Hjaltland in a deal worth UK£2.2 million (US$3.619 million). The sale of Robert Nicolson’s Skelda Salmon and George Duncan’s G Duncan (Salmon) Ltd leaves just four working salmon farms in local ownership: two in Unst, one in Yell and one in Skerries. Over 90 percent of the industry is now in the hands of three foreign operators who are keen to increase production in a booming market.

The two farms bought by Hjaltland at Spoose Holm, off the Scalloway isles, and Setter Voe off Burra are licensed to produce 2,100 tonnes of fish but neither is currently growing fish. Hjaltland plans to restock them in spring next year. G Duncan has not grown its own fish for a number of years and was leased to Skelda. It was hit by the outbreak of infectious salmon anaemia in 2009 which started in a nearby Scottish Sea Farms site. Skelda was forced to harvest the fish in November 2009 and leave the site fallow. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Vietnamese tra fish faces nasty trick, once again

The false information released at “Pangasius Lie” by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), the program broadcasted on German television one month ago, has made the demand for tra fish in the north of the Europe decrease dramatically. At the 30 minute program, a fisheries expert of WWF, Catherine Zucco, said “tra fish are dangerous because they are being farmed on dirty waters.”

Right after the program was broadcasted, a retail group has stopped providing tra fish products on its supermarket chain in Denmark and Norway. Metrol has also stopped selling tra fish in Germany. The tra fish consumption in the north of the Europe has been decreasing sharply over the past several weeks, especially in Germany. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Aquaculture field day to focus on raising coldwater fish species

A workshop is being planned for later this spring to unveil new research and advances in the culture of coldwater species of fish. The program is being held June 8-9 at the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point's Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility near Red Cliff. Sponsored by University of Wisconsin Steven Point (UWSP), UW-Extension, UW-Madison/Aquaculture Program, and the Wisconsin Aquaculture Association, the event will take a closer look at fish like arctic char, coho salmon, Atlantic salmon, and rainbow trout.

Coldwater fish nutrition and health will be addressed as well as flow-through and recycle systems technology, pond management, water quality, and various lighting strategies for coldwater species culture. Speakers will include experts in coldwater species culture from around the country, including Steven Summerfelt, Chris Good, Brian Vinci and John Davidson Bill Wolters and many more. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Canadians back aquaculture regulation

A recent survey indicates most Canadians support national legislation to govern the aquaculture industry, says a group representing fish farmers. The survey, involving 1,196 randomly selected Canadian adults, was done earlier this month by Abacus Data Inc. "Canadians overwhelmingly support our call for a federal aquaculture act," said a news release from the Canadian Aquaculture Industry Alliance.

Survey results found 40 percent strongly support the creation of an act, while 41 percent somewhat support the establishment of one. The survey found four percent were opposed to national legislation and the remainder apparently had no opinion. Although the Canadian aquaculture industry is governed by 73 separate rules or regulations from coast to coast, Canada is the only major seafood-producing nation without national legislation specifically designed for the aquaculture industry, said the release. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Sea lice “breakthrough” ready for sharing, say salmon firm

What is claimed to be an innovative way of collecting and removing sea lice is being developed following a trial by Loch Duart Ltd. The company Loch Duart say they are keen to share this “innovation” with any other salmon farmer interested.  “Sea lice have been around as long as salmon have existed and will be as long as they continue to,” said Nick Joy, Managing Director.

“Loch Duart hopes and aim to work to ensure that salmon have a long future ahead and that sea lice will not be a significant factor affecting the species’ future. Whilst we are not yet at the point where we can say that sea lice are over as an issue, we can say that we have taken a new step in the control of this perennial pest.” He added that for some time they have been researching and developing “novel” methods to counter sea lice. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Chinese fish drowning in antibiotics

The reservoir at the back of the home of Mr. Zhang, a Guizhou Province resident, “used to be so clear that we could see the bottom,” he told The Epoch Times in an interview. It was the source of drinking water for the whole village.

But when the reservoir was contracted out to fish farmers they almost turned it into a toxic waste dump. Because they want to maximize profits by breeding far more fish than the natural environment could support, Mr. Zhang said, they were liberal in use of urea, animal manure, and antibiotics, with no regard for how things would turn out down the line. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Review: Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture


 
Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture

ISBN: 978-90-481-3085-0

In July 2007 a workshop was held on 'Research Needs for Sustaining Aquaculture to 2025 and beyond' where the idea for this book originated. The workshop was funded by the International Development Research Center (Canada).

Sena S De Silva is the Director General of Network of Aquaculture Centers in Asia-Pacific and also an Honorary Professor, School of Life & Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia.

F Brian Davy is a Senior Fellow at the International Institute for Sustainable Development (Canada) with over 35 years experience in the field of aquatic resources edited Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture which was published in 2010.

This publication looks at selected success stories of aquaculture in Asia and the lessons learned.

Chapter one looks at the successes in Asia, contributing to sustained development and poverty alleviation. It deals with fish and human nutrition the traditional fish food supplies and the fish food needs. It also deals with key features of the aquaculture sector and the public perceptions on aquaculture.

Chapter two covers recent developments in rice-fish culture in China looking at the livelihood improvements and the holistic approaches used in this culture. It cover the historical accounts of this kind of aquaculture along with the evolution of fish culture in rice fields and recent developments. The important systems and practices and the contributions to food security and safety.

In later chapters the book looks at shrimp farmers in India, backyard hatcheries and small scale shrimp and prawn farming in Thailand and cage fish culture in Nepal. It also looks at enhancing rural farmers income through fish production in Sri Lanka and the Striped Catfish aquaculture in Vietnam.

The final three chapters deal with the genetic improvement of farmed tilapias: impacts and lessons learned. The role of exotics in Chinese inland aquaculture and a synthesis and the lessons learned.

Success Stories in Asian Aquaculture is an interesting book, showing the success stories of aquaculture. Aquaculture from Asia accounts for 85 percent of the global production. Aquaculture in Asia is on a small scale, mainly due to the fact that it is carried out by families who own and operate fish farms. Most involved in aquaculture in Asia are in the rural communities.

I think this book is a good starting point for anyone that has an interest in aquaculture and especially to those involved in research or are development workers and decision makers. Its a good starting point for students who are interested in aquaculture in developing countries. 

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
 


Enhanced by Zemanta

Green' farming key to exports

The environmental impacts of aquaculture and sustainable production practices have become important factors in purchasing decisions made by export markets, experts said yesterday. Farmers, breeders and processors should be aware of this and apply strict standards in all their operations, Pham Anh Tuan, deputy director of the General Department of Fisheries told a conference in HCM City.

The conference, which focused on tra (pangasius) exports, heard that Vietnam exported 153,062 tonnes of the fish worth US$376,430 (€257,361) in the first three months of the year, an increase of 5.2 percent in volume and 21.6 percent in value over the same period last year. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

March 2011: Catfish feed deliveries up

US Total catfish feed delivered in the United States during March 2011 was 17,459 tons, up 29 percent from March 2010 and up 252 percent from the previous month. Foodsize catfish feed delivered totaled 16,891 tons, up 33 percent from the corresponding month a year ago. March feed delivered to Alabama catfish growers for foodsize fish totaled 6,951 tons, up 100 percent from last year.

Alabama accounted for 41 percent of the total foodsize catfish feed delivered to United States farmers. The other major States with catfish feed deliveries for foodsize fish in March and their comparison to the previous year were Arkansas with 1,431 tons, up two percent; Louisiana with 298 tons, up four percent; and Mississippi with 5,446 tons, up 20 percent. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Cardiomyopathy Syndrome (CMS) Virus Discovered

Norway PHARMAQ and the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science have identified the virus causing cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) of Atlantic salmon. Through this discovery more tools will become available that will make it possible to control the disease and limit the spread and the impact of the disease. PHARMAQ will explore the possibilities for developing a vaccine against CMS, a disease which currently results in significant losses for the aquaculture industry.

Cardiomyopathy syndrome of Atlantic salmon was first recorded in the mid 80’s in Norway. Economic losses are high since primarily fish at slaughter size die. The virus was discovered through a close research collaboration between PHARMAQ with project manager Marit Rode, and Professor Øystein Evensen and his research group at the Norwegian School of Veterinary Science. This is a result of a close and productive collaboration over many years, say the two scientists. The research program was partly funded by the Research Council of Norway. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Soybean meal in tilapia diets

Chinese scientists studied the effects of different levels of soybean meal inclusion in replacement for fish meal on growth, digestive enzymes and transaminase activities in practical diets for juvenile tilapia. This study evaluated the effects of replacing fish meal (FM) in practical diets for tilapia (Oreochromis  niloticus x O. aureus) with different levels of soybean meal (SBM) on growth, digestive enzymes and liver transaminase activities.

Five isonitrogenous (crude protein 300 g/kg) and isoenergetic (gross energy 16 kJ/g) practical diets were formulated by replacing zero (the control), 25, 50, 75 and 100 percent of protein from fish meal with SBM. Each diet was randomly assigned to triplicate groups of 30 fish per aquarium (mean initial weight 4.0 g). Fish were fed three times daily to apparent satiation for eight weeks. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Fishermen hamper efforts to reduce beach shark attacks

Director of Quy Nhon City Urban Environment Company's Planning Unit Nguyen Huu Dung said the company and local authorities were responsible for removing fish and shrimp rafts and traps just off the city beach over the last six days. The move aims to prevent sharks from coming inshore and attacking swimmers. Fish and shrimps bred on rafts and captured in traps were believed to have attracted sharks to the shallow water, he said.

"Nine teams have collected rubbish and 40 large rafts and traps in deep water from Hai Cang to Gheng Rang Ward and removed tens of small rafts further away from the beaches," Dung said. However, thousands of rafts, set along the coast by local fishermen, remain unmoved. Company worker Nguyen Van Tin said they had tried to carry out their task but had faced major opposition from local fishermen. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Canada supporting the expansion of aquaculture

Canada's new survey reveals the majority of Canadians support national legislation to govern and enable the growth of our aquaculture industry. Conducted from April 7 - 14, 2011, the survey found that eight in ten Canadians (81 percent) either strongly support (40 percent) or somewhat support (41 percent) a national Aquaculture Act. Only four percent oppose national legislation.

Even in British Columbia where campaigns opposing aquaculture are most active, 79 percent of respondents either strongly or somewhat support the development of an Aquaculture Act. More than six in ten Canadians indicated support for national legislation, saying the country needs national standards for the industry (69 percent) and a framework for industry growth (60 percent). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

New Brunswick shrimp industry given a financial boost by government

New Brunswick's shrimp industry, which generates CAN$82 million  (UK£52.464 million) a year in product sales, received a significant boost this week with the announcement that the province is investing CAN$840,000 (UK£537,437) to help in the rationalisation of the traditional shrimp fishing fleet in the province.

New Brunswick Agriculture, Aquaculture and Fisheries Minister Michael Olscamp and Economic Development Minister Paul Robichaud were in Lameque Tuesday to make the announcement. The provincial funds, from the Regional Development Corporation, represent 30 percent of the total investment with the balance coming from the harvesting and processing industries.

The Fisheries Renewal Framework outlines how balancing harvesting capacity with the availability of the resource is one of the ways government can support an industry-led strategy. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Stirling’s MSc Aquaculture distance learning continues to grow

The Institute of Aquaculture at the University of Stirling says that its new approach to obtaining an MSc in Sustainable Aquaculture by Distance Learning continues to prove popular as another student module starts. Professor Brian Austin, Director of the Institute of Aquaculture expressed his delight at the continued growth in interest in these innovative programmes.

He said: "It is great to see a further 20 percent increase in student enrollment on this program." Expanding, he explained that the flexibility of the distance learning approach allows students to select modules over several years allowing them to build their credits on their own schedule, depending on personal circumstances. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Chilean mussel producers look to consolidate international markets

In recent years, there has been a steady growth in Chilean mussel farming, which encourages fishing companies to seek new markets and diversify its production, mainly salmon. While the fishing industry spent only around US$190 million (UK£115 million) in this activity over the last 15 years, the production of farmed mussels rose sharply.

The fishing sector intends to position mussels as one of the best seafood products in the world, reports Diario Financiero. According to data provided by the National Fisheries Service (Sernapesca), during mid 1990, Chile produced 2,100 tonnes of mussels. Whilst 10 years later, a total of 28,000 tonnes were obtained. In 2009, the harvest of mussels came to 168,000 tonnes, and in 2010, the figure reached over 214,000 tonnes. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Aquaculture Dialogues to be handed over in Brussels

At the 2010 European Seafood Exposition in Brussels the Aquaculture Stewardship Council presented it's visual identity. This year the Aquaculture Dialogues Standards for Tilapia, Pangasius and Abalone, that have independently been formulated by multi-stakeholder groups led by World Wildlife Fund, will be officially handed over by WWF to the Aquaculture Stewardship Council on the first day of the Brussels Seafood Exposition.

 The event will take place on May 3 at the ASC stand at 1300 hrs. The ASC says: “We cordially invite you to be present at this event which is a milestone in the development of the ASC and in the implementation of the most robust, independent and metric based sustainability standards for farmed fish. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Stirling University: Lecturers to strike in dispute over job losses

Lecturers are to strike next week at Stirling University in a row over job losses at the School of aquaculture department. Members of the University and College Union (UCU) will take the action on Tuesday outside the campus's main entrance. Picket lines will be manned from 8am at the university gate off the A9, and a general meeting will take place later in the morning.

Students are expected to show their support by joining lecturers in a march from the rural campus to the town center, followed by a rally. A hustings with the Scottish parliamentary election candidates for Clackmannanshire and Dunblane will follow. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Royal DSM NV Donates US$70,000 to CEI’s sustainable aquaculture program

Royal DSM NV presented the Cape Eleuthera Institute (CEI) with a cheque for US$70,000 (UK£42,433.37) for further research for offshore aquaculture. DSM and CEI are collaborating to demonstrate that raising fish in an offshore cage within the Bahamas and other warm water locales is possible and can be done with assured success and in a sustainable manner.

DSM and CEI have been actively working together since 2009 in a partnership to find improved predation controls for warm water aquaculture. This is the first Corporate sponsorship that CEI has received. CEI promotes conservation of tropical and coastal ecosystems throughout. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

State poised for rapid strides in prawn cultivation

Better late than never. After a long delay, Assam is poised to make rapid strides in freshwater prawn cultivation. Pilot projects in the state have dispelled doubts over the feasibility of fresh water prawn farming in this region.

According to sources in the Fisheries Department, fresh water prawn will be available in the state very soon. Scampi, the commercial name of the large fresh water prawn (Macrobrachium rossenbergii) has been commercially cultured in the state’s agro climatic condition sending a positive message to fish farmers. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Untreated sewage blamed for fish deaths

Discharge of untreated sewage has been blamed for recent fish deaths in Nanjing in eastern China. Untreated sewage that ended up in a nearby river following the shutdown of a water treatment plant was blamed for the deaths of thousands of fish in east China's Jiangsu Province, the local government there says.

Official sources report that thousands of dead fish were found floating in sections of the Waiqinhuai River in the province's capital city of Nanjing over the past two days, a spokesman with the city government said. The results of tests and monitoring by the city's environment bureau showed that the mass fish deaths might be related to the recent shutdown of a sewage treatment plant, he said.  Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

UK - Money for fish farming

An innovative crab waste recycling scheme topped a list of fishing industry projects in Devon and Cornwall sharing a UK£1.9 million (US$3.11 million) pot of European funding this month. A total of 16 projects benefited from the money, made available through the European Fisheries Fund (EFF) and Marine Management Organisation (MMO).

The Blue Seafood Company received UK£179,000 (US$293,024.) to develop its Paignton factory so that crab processing waste can be turned into a by-product for use by whelk fishermen, as well as UK£6,500 (US$10,640.) for cold storage. Nick Howell, owner of the Pilchard Works in Newlyn and a member of the port's harbour commission, said the fund was "hugely important" for the industry. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Salmon: There's trouble upstream

The Atlantic salmon is under threat from over-fishing, pollution and farming. So what can be done to preserve this regal fish? An epic traveller and spectacular high-jumper, the Atlantic salmon is one of Europe's most enduring creatures. For thousands of years they have roamed free across the Atlantic Ocean and spawned in the rivers and streams that flow out into the North Atlantic. Yet this remarkable animal given the regal nickname of the "king of fish" faces an uncertain future.

Over the past 40 years overall European stocks of Atlantic salmon have experienced a multi-decadal decline from around eight million in the early 1970s to around three million today, resulting in the lowest population levels observed since regular monitoring began in the 1970s. While stock levels in a handful of individual rivers (eg, the Tyne) have increased in recent years, due to intense and localised conservation efforts, Atlantic salmon populations in general are contracting. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publisher
Enhanced by Zemanta

Catching an industry in Koh Kong, Cambodia

Cambodia is increasingly turning to fish farming in order to meet domestic demand. The business can be lucrative, but faces hurdles such as requiring substantial investment and know-how, according to Cheng Chhun, owner of the Cheng Chhun Seafish Farm.

Dozens of fish farms hug the shore in the Mondul Seima district of Koh Kong province, but Cheng Chhun’s is the largest, with eight ponds on a nine-hectare farm. Each pond contains between 5,000 to 10,000 fish, with a single pond worth of fish taking some six months to mature and fetching between US$30,000 (€20,793.63) and US$40,000 (€27,724.84). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Aquaculture in Minas Gerais grows by 30 percent over two years

Statistics from the Federal Superintendent of the Ministry of Fisheries and Aquaculture (MPA) in Minas Gerais reveal that between 2008 and 2009, the aquaculture production chain grew on average by 30 percent, while between 2002 and 2007, that growth was 10 percent. Meanwhile, at the national level, aquaculture has increased on average by 10 percent, reports Agrosoft.

"Besides being an activity that requires little capital to those who only produce, the National Bank of Economic and Social Development (BNDES) is firm to help develop new businesses in the area," said the coordinator of the agency, Lucas Rocha Carneiro. According to the latest census conducted in the state of Minas Gerais, 29 percent of the surveyed producers were cultivating more than 11 million units of ornamental fish. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Sea Urchins turning into cannibals

Sea urchins have becomes a trendy food, and because of our feeding and overcrowding them, they're even starting to eat each other. Sea urchins, prized for their edible gonads, resort to cannibalism when starved and forced into overcrowded tanks, according to new research.

There are no documented reports of cannibalism among wild sea urchin populations, according to the study, so little doubt exists that man-made conditions are driving this behaviour. Aquaculture of sea urchins is particularly popular in Japan and China, where millions of tons are harvested each year.

Certain fish raised for human consumption, such as Cobia, trout and flounder, as well as many species of shrimp and lobsters, are also known to become cannibals when under stress. That is one reason the claws of lobsters are bound when these shellfish are confined in small fish market tank. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta

Sustainable indoor urban fish & vegetable farms in Sacramento

With all the new hydroponics stores opening in Sacramento, the green health trend that's emerging in Sacramento emphasizes indoor farms in urban areas, sometimes in basements. Check out the Sustainable Urban Gardens website. Also watch this video capture carbon in soil with organic farming. The popular trend goes beyond hydroponics or aquaculture. It's about aquaponics growing indoors fish and vegetables together so that fish and plants coexist under the same roof.

An April 18, 2011 article by Chicago Tribune writer, Melissa Harris, reprinted today in the Sacramento Bee, "Sustainable urban farms are cropping up indoors: fish, plants coexist at aqua-ponic sites," explains how people are turning former factories and even meatpacking plants into urban indoor farms in various cities. Let's say you want to start on a tiny scale in Sacramento and you can't afford to buy or lease large abandoned industrial buildings or lease stockyard space. Instead, on a smaller scale, you grow vegetables and fish indoors, creating sustainable urban farms. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Virus may be causing Pacific salmon mortalities

Pacific salmon may be dying from a leukemia-type virus, according to a new theory to explain falling wild salmon numbers in the Fraser River. In Canada's Fraser River, a mysterious illness has killed millions of Pacific salmon, and scientists have a new hypothesis about the cause. The wild salmon may be suffering from viral infections similar to those linked to some forms of leukemia and lymphoma, reports McClatchy newspapers.

For 60 years before the early 1990s, an average of nearly eight million wild salmon returned from the Pacific Ocean to the Fraser River each year to spawn. Now the salmon industry is in a state of collapse, with mortality rates ranging from 40 to 95 per cent. The salmon run has been highly variable. The worst year came in 2009, with 1.5 million salmon, followed by the best year in 2010, with 30 million salmon. But the overall trend is downward. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Enhanced by Zemanta

Fortunes turn for Marine Harvest

Norwegian aquaculture and fish processing company Marine Harvest has seen profits more than double last year compared to 2009. In its annual report the company shows that profits rise to NOK3.108 billion (US$573 million) from NOK1.302 billion(US$238 million) the previous year.

Sales rose from NOK14.65 billion (US$2.68 billion) to NOK15.19 billion (US$2.78 billion)

However, the rise in sales and profits comes on the back of lower harvest volumes last year with production at 295,683 tonnes last year compared to 327,100 tonnes in 2009. In its annual report, Marine Harvest said that strong underlying demand and tight global supply resulted in a solid market and increased prices for salmon in 2010. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


Enhanced by Zemanta

Probiotics – An alternative treatment for bacterial coldwater disease

Probiotics are generally defined as bacteria that promote the health of other organisms. Carolyn Gunn, DVM, Assistant State Fish Pathologist at Colorado Division of Wildlife, looks at probiotics as an alternative treatment for bacterial coldwater disease. Specifically, probiotics are live microorganisms, which when consumed in adequate amounts provide a health benefit for the host.

Probiotics have been used to promote the health of humans and terrestrial livestock for a considerable period of time. Probiotics are available in foods and dietary supplements. Yogurt, fermented and unfermented milk, miso, and soy beverages are examples of foods that contain probiotics. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publisher
Enhanced by Zemanta

Vertical integration key to sea cucumber success

Large numbers of larvae of the sea cucumber (Australostichopus mollis) have settled in the intensive settlement system at the Ahumoana a Toi Aquaculture Centre, writes Andrew Morgan. Currently, the ability of this pilot intensive commercial settlement system to produce large numbers of juveniles is being assessed. This system is also part of a production platform designed as a pilot for selective breeding.

The nutritional requirements of larvae and its impact on growth and development and how this relates to the rearing environment is used for successful intensive and sustainable pilot commercial-scale production. Larval competency and the ability of large numbers of larvae to complete the larval cycle, settle and become juveniles are very dependent on this. Handling techniques during larval rearing have a significant impact on the numbers of larvae completing the larval cycle and settling. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


Enhanced by Zemanta

New catfish feed formulations tested

High ingredient prices in 2008 led feed mills to begin manufacturing new, less expensive feed formulations untested under commercial catfish farming conditions. New feed formulations have been tested at the University of Arkansas Pine Bluff (UAPB) for the past three years by professors at UAPB and researchers at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

In 2008, three 32 percent protein diets (an industry standard, an alternative and a corn gluten feed diet) and a 24 percent protein diet were tested. The 32 percent industry standard diet resulted in significantly greater yield of carryover fish. Feed conversion ratios of the standard and alternative diets were significantly lower than those of the 32 percent corn gluten and 24 percent protein diets, but visceral fat content was higher for the standard and alternate diets. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


Enhanced by Zemanta

Feed Outlook - April 2011

The recent grains stocks report confirms that supplies are tight, according to Tom Capehart and Edward Allen in the latest report from the USDA Economic Research Service.The Grain Stocks report issued by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) at the end of March shows relatively tight March 1 stocks for each of the feed grains.

US corn feed and residual use is lowered 50 million bushels due to the recent run-up in corn prices and increased prospects for wheat feeding this summer. Corn used to producer ethanol is increased by 50 million bushels this month as ethanol production continues at near-record levels. The midpoints of the forecasts of the marketing year average prices received by farmers for corn, sorghum and oats are unchanged this month but the price ranges were narrowed. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
Enhanced by Zemanta