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Thursday, June 30, 2011

The last ten years fish farms triple in Egypt to cope with demand

Increasing demand for fish in Egypt has caused a knock on effect that has resulted in the number of fish farms in Egypt being tripled. This also has an effect which is environmental and bring challenges to the aquatic environment.

“In 1999, fish farms were producing 200,000 tons of fish annually to comply with consumers’ demands,” says Abdel Rahman al-Gamal, a senior aquaculture scientist for the African division of WorldFish Center. “Today, the demand has reached 750,000 tons per year and is expected to hit a million over the next five years,” he stresses. The majority of Egypt’s fish production is generated from natural fisheries and aquaculture. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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US$200 million investment in Malaysia by Norway's BioProtein

Norway's BioProtein Engineering AS plan to build a plant in Malaysia to produce high-protein feed for the aquaculture industry. Managing director Arild Johannessen said "it was currently evaluating whether to set up the plant in Bintulu, Malacca or the eastern part of the peninsula".

“We need close access to natural gas for the fermentation process. The initial production capacity is expected to be 40,000 tonnes a year, which requires 50 million cu m of gas,” he told Malaysian reporters at the BIO International Convention (BIO Washington DC) here on Tuesday. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Almost 600 jobs could be created in Marlborough New Zealand

New Zealands King Salmon Company is looking to increase its production by 2015 they propose to double production to 15,000 tons a year. This increase in production will only go ahead if the company is allowed to double their water space in the Marlborough sounds. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Oyster aquaculture needs NOAA approval sooner rather than later

The permits required for Oyster aquaculture are slow in arriving due to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) lack of momentum, which puts fisheries job in jeopardy. Senators Mikulski, and Cardin has called on the  (NOAA) to speed up and complete the approval of the permits without further delay.

In a letter to Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere Jane Lubchenco, they expressed their "frustration over the extended amount of time it has taken NOAA to approve Maryland's oyster aquaculture permits in the Chesapeake Bay." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Large retailers fight Catfish farmers over proposed rule

A fight has broke out over the broad proposed rule about catfish safety, Wal Mart and other retailers do not want the US agriculture department catfish inspections to cover swai, basa and other Asian whitefish . One of the major concerns is that if the rule should be made law then prices would be pushed up.

“Those offerings would be expected to disappear from store shelves following issuance of a final rule,” said Stephanie Lester, vice president of international trade for the association, reports Arkansas News. “The lack of available product would be expected to cause instantaneous price increases.”

“This is vital to the safety of American consumers and is of vital importance to the survival of the US farm-raised catfish industry,” said Sissy Bridges of Catfish Farmers of America (CFA). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Marine Harvests and First Nation celebrate aquaculture agreement

Three years of discussions, have ended and the result is that three First Nations and Marine Harvest have entered into a capacity-building agreement. This is the tenths agreement of its kind between Marine Harvest and the coastal First Nations. 

Ian Roberts, Marine Harvest communications manager "You want to make sure that the business that is going on in their territory is of benefit to the membership, to the bands, and provides operational security to the company," Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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King Crabs prefer Salmon meal

In Norway a trail carried out under the direction of Norfima is indicating that salmon meal can replace the more traditional fish meal/herring meal without having an effect on growth or quality. This means that salmon producers can earn money from their salmon by-products.

These trails are aimed at helping to develop the king crab fishery into a world leader in feed enhancement and sale of live king crabs. “In this project we wanted to replace as much of the traditional fish meal as possible with salmon meal, without having a negative effect on the growth, survival and quality of the king crab,” says Senior Scientist Sten Siikavuopio. Read more ...


This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Thailand organisation wins award for sustainable aquaculture

The Network of Aquaculture Centers in Asia Pacific (NACA) have been awarded a top award for sustainable aquaculture. The FAO awarded the Lizarrage Medal to NACA in Thailand they were selected due to the significant contribution to the development of sustainable aquaculture in the Asia and Pacific region.

The NCAC model as an intergovernmental organisation and a regional network this system and attitude has been emulated in other regions as a catalytic effect of the achievement. The Medal pays tribute to Ms Margarita Lizárraga, Senior Fishery Officer, for her decisive role in promotion the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Soybean meal and yeast replaces fish meal

Researchers at the Kentucky State University research centre are looking at replacing fish meal with soybean or yeast meal as an alternative feed for tilapia. Due to the cost of feed making up 40 to 80 percent of the operating expenses of an intense aquaculture enterprise it is essential to evaluate low cost nutritious diets.

The use of sustainable, alternative protein sources, such as plant and yeast meals, provides the opportunity for the use of organic diets in aquaculture. Organic agriculture is the fastest growing food production industry in many countries and the sale of organic products increase revenue for producers up to 20 percent higher than non-organic counterparts. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Salmon conservationist arrested by RCMP

Darrell Tingley, president of the Medway River Salmon Association was arrested at port Medway wharf where he attempted to block the delivery of salmon smolts that were destined to be transported to a fish farm near Coffin Island.

He was arrested along with other people who had tried to interfere with the transport of the young salmon smolts. Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), whom made the arrested held him until the transports were loaded, he was then warned not to interfere with the future loading and transport operations again. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Algae World Australia 2011

Algae World Australia will meet in Townsville, Queensland on 16-17 August 2011 to put the spotlight on topics like Growing algae in Australia, Government policies and programs, Waste-water based algae production, Development of aviation Biofuel from Algae, Cost effective Algae Harvesting & Processing, scaling up algae production, and more. In addition, the conference features an exclusive technical site visit to the MBD Energy & James Cook University Algal R&D Facility, occupying 5,500 square metres of JCU's Townsville campus. Drawing from their practical experiences, invited industry experts will also discuss:
  • Algae for Carbon Capture 
  • Microalgal Lipid Content & Productivities 
  • Algae in Health, Feed andCosmetics 
  • Design and Optimisation of Photobioreactor & Open Pond Culture Systems
Kicking off the 1.5-day conference is Dr Susan Blackburn, Head of Australian National Algae Culture Collection. She shares her expertise on algae’s ideal location for growth, and evaluate suitable algae species and strains for Australia for biofuels and bioproducts via her session on "Towards a Knowledge Management System for Algae Biofuels".

Registration for this highly anticipated event is already open but as places for the SITE VISIT are limited, contact huiyan@cmtsp.com.sg now to secure seats for the conference and site visit or immediately register online at the official Algae World Australia. See full press release

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Tuesday, June 28, 2011

University of Arkansas offers its first aquacultural doctoral program

The University of Arkansas is to offer its first aquaculture doctoral program. Professor Carole Engle director of UAPB's Aquaculture & Fisheries Center. She's talking about the university's plans to "offer its first doctoral program, in aquaculture and fisheries".

The Center is widely recognised as a Centers of Excellence, partnerships between educational institutions and the USDA, perform research on agricultural issues and the US Department of Agriculture has designated it a center of excellence.  "We have probably one of the best [aquaculture and fisheries] programs in the world," said UAPB Chancellor Lawrence Davis Jr. "It's quite appropriate that we offer a doctorate." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Calls for risk assessment by AMI

The American Meat Institution (AMI) has filed a response to the Food Safety and Inspections Service (FSIS) about the proposed rule for implementing an inspection program on catfish and catfish products. They are urging the FSIS to make sure the rule on this subject does not trigger any retaliatory measures by important trading partners.

“Exports are a key component to growth and profitability in the meat industry and for that reason AMI members and the meat industry have a vested interest in ensuring that any inspection program implemented by the FSIS does not adversely affect the meat industry’s export opportunities,” AMI wrote. Read more ...


This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Protests against fish farm change

The Medway River Salmon Association (MRSA), has been working extremely hard to repopulate wild Atlantic salmom, but a new threat has emerged in the form of open pen farming by Cooke Aquaculture. They recently acquired an ex trout farm off Coffin Island and converted it to open pen salmon rearing.

The president of MRSA Darrell Tingley said “We heard from a local person that Cooke had bought the Ocean farms, which was a trout farm off of Coffin Island, and they were going to convert it from rearing trout to rearing salmon,” said Tingley. “That gave us great concern because the Medway River is right here through the harbor.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Mandatory testing for shrimp has been implemented in India

The concerns presented by the Southern Shrimp Alliance (SSA) regarding the increase in shipments of shrimp from an Indian exporter who is currently subject to two separate import alerts has caused India to implement mandatory testing for the shrimp exports.

The US Food and Drug Administration has carried out its own investigation and found that India has implemented measures that the FDA had recommended “including a mandatory preharvest sample and testing program for unapproved residues for all shrimp exported to the US.” Read more ...


This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Novus and Verenium form partnership in animal feed

Verenium and Novus International have announced a joint strategic collaboration to develop and commercialise a suite of new enzyme products from Verenium’s late-stage product pipeline targeting the poultry, swine, beef, dairy, aquaculture and companion animals markets. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Clean Seas first trail of bluefin tuna is encouraging

Clean Seas Tuna first trail of farming Southern Bluefin tuna has been encouraging by the survival of some of the Southern Bluefin juveniles in the sea trails to grow juvenile fish Managing director Clifford Ashby said "this milestone has reinforced the company's confidence in its research and development team as they move towards commercialisation". "Overall, we remain confident that commercialisation of the Southern Bluefin Tuna life cycle at Arno Bay is a realistic objective and the company is highly encouraged by its first at sea, grow-out trials this season," he said. Read more ..

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

New research station focus on coastal aquaculture in British Columbia

A new research facility at Deep-Bay British Columbia, is seeking ways to re-energise the coastal aquaculture industry. The off campus research unit is part of the facility of the Centre for Shellfish Research at Vancouver Island University that supports sustainable shellfish aquaculture development while encouraging preservation of coastal ecosystems.

This facility will also support First Nation shellfish aquaculture businesses, through training and monitoring. It will also seek to strengthen innovation by increasing interaction between the aquaculture operators and the researchers and it will link research to training to support the coastal economies. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Monday, June 27, 2011

Freshwater hatchery established at Leyte

The Leyte provincial officer established a freshwater hatchery in Leyte to help cope with the growing demand of tilapia fingerlings in Barangay Libongao, Kananga town. “The pond area of the hatchery is about 1,338 sq. m. accommodating 600 breeders.

The hatchery was made operational through the recommendations and careful supervision of the provincial agriculture office’s fishery experts. Thus far, KIPC has produced approximately 400,000 fry distributed to the backyard pond operators in nearby municipalities. But the demand is very high,” Portula said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Scotland show off Prawnfresh to visiting skippers and processors

Prawn skippers and processors visiting the Scotland skipper expo in Aberdeen on the 25 and 26 of June and they will be shown firsthand the health benefits of prawnfresh also the safer and effective treatment than sodium metabisulphite in preventing blackspot or melanosis in prawns.

John Davis, the managing director of Scottish based company Xyrex, which manufactures Prawnfresh Plus, says: “Prawnfresh Plus is a liquid solution designed to increase shelf life, whilst retaining the natural taste and appearance of prawns, thus eliminating the use of sodium metabisulphite. Skippers also recognise that the health of their crew is paramount and this is reflected in the growing number of fishermen now using this highly effective alternative treatment.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Japan to be the location for AgriMarine to rear Bluefin Tuna

AgriMarine are pleased to announce that they have entered into an agreement with Tokai University to enter into research and development for a project to rear bluefin tuna on a commercial scale, using AquaMarines solid wall closed contaminant systems. What has become important over the last few years is to ensure we have a stable population of bluefin tuna without depleting the wild stocks.

Bluefin is a species of major importance and prized by the Japanese, recently in Japan at the Tsukiji fish market a 342 kg bluefin was sold for a record US$400,000 (€281,027). "We look forward to working with Tokai University. This project represents another avenue to demonstrate the application of the Company's containment and life support technology with a very high value, high margin species," said Richard Buchanan, CEO of the Company. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Stirling University to receive Chinese aquaculture students

The University of Stirling and Guangdong Ocean University recently signed an international agreement to allow Chinese students to study aquaculture at Stirling demonstrating the Universities world class expertise in this field. The Agreement signing is the culmination of a long standing research partnership between the two Universities. This agreement will see the Chinese students transferring after they have attained their four year BSc degree to pursue an aquaculture Masters degree at Stirling.

Professor Sandra Adams of the Institute of Aquaculture explained the background: "I have had close links with senior scientists from Guangdong Ocean University (GOU) for about 15 years, co-chairing sessions and giving talks at international conferences in China and elsewhere. Our research areas are very similar, focusing on fish disease diagnosis and vaccine development." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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BioMar Norway factory opens new feed line

On BioMar's 25 anniversary last week the company opened a new feed production line. The new line more than doubles the total production at the Myre factory to 260,000 tons. This is the largest investment that BioMar has ever carried out. “BioMar plays an important role, with a high activity level in R&D to ensure that the fish is utilising the feed in the most efficient way. And BioMar makes use of new raw materials and new technology,” said Ms Berg-Hansen.

She added: “I worked for a competing feed producer many years ago, so the words come from the heart. It is important for the aquaculture industry that the suppliers to the industry take responsibility for research in their respective areas. And BioMar is actively working to ensure a sustainable use of our resources.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Friday, June 24, 2011

Aurora Algae awards MWH and John Holland (JH)

A new project get underway in Maitland, Western Australia. Aurora Algae after securing the1,500 acres of land have awarded the contracts to MWH and John Holland (JH) for the design and construction of Aurora's new facilities. Aurora Algae’s commercial facility will be equipped to manufacture thousands of tonnes of algae-based biomass annually for the production of sustainable products in the nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, aquaculture and renewable energy markets.

“The John Holland team is excited to be working with Aurora Algae and MWH to deliver this commercial-scale new technology carbon reduction project that will have a positive benefit on the environment”.  Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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AgriMarine announces Board of Directors changes

AgriMarine Holdings the leader in floating closed containment technology and production for sustainable aquaculture, announces the resignation of John D. Reynolds from his position as Chairman of the Board and as a Director, and the new appointment of Harry Knutson as Chairman of the Board, following  Reynolds resignation.

"On behalf of the Board, we wish to thank John for his hard work and significant contributions as Chairman over the past three years and are appreciative of his desire to remain in an advisory capacity to the Company," said Richard Buchanan, CEO of AgriMarine. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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AquaNor sourcing food supply from environmentally friendly aquaculture

Aquaculture in the future will be extremely important in providing a good food source from aquaculture. AquaNor announced the akvARENA SEA 2011 "Food supply from environmentally friendly aquaculture - a dream or reality" conference, which will feature at the AquaNor event on August 18, 2011.

AquaNor is proud to present
  • Kristine Gramstad, State secretary in The Ministry of Fisheries and Coastal Affairs in Norway:Environmental sustainability - a prerequisite for further growth.
  • Alf Helge Aarskog, Chief Executive Officer Marine Harvest ASA: Food-security and environmental issues; can the world manage without farming the oceans?
  • José Villalon, Director Aquaculture Programme, WWF: Standards for responsible aquaculture.
  • Felipe Matias, Brazilian Secretary of Aquaculture Development and Executive Secretary of Aquaculture Network of Americas: Brazil - aquaculture production and conservation policies is it possible to combine?
  • Karl Almås, Director of SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture. Is technology the answer to increased aquaculture production?
  • Rohana Subasinghe, Senior Aquaculture Officer Fisheries and Aquaculture in FAO: Requirement and availability of feed input.

For details on registration see : www.sea2011.no . Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Salmon farmers publicise their influence

BC Salmon Farmers Association (BCSFA), have released a pamphlet highlighting the contribution it makes to coastal communities. "We stress the importance of three pillars of sustainability: environmental, social and economic this economic activity is providing stability for communities by offering steady, year round work for people of many different backgrounds," said Mary Ellen Walling, Executive Director of the BCSFA.

"The people working in salmon farming know about our good work with this publication we hope to educate others as well," said Ms Walling. The New pamphlet seeks to answer questions on salmon farming as well. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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A new study into salmon feeding paths

The University of Southampton with funding by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has discovered a new method of tracking where Atlantic salmon feed in the ocean. The study has shown that the marine location can be recovered from the chemistry of  the fish scales.

Another surprising fact has show that British salmon from different rivers migrate to different places to feed and may respond differently to environmental change. A paper published recently in the Scientific Reports shows that fish carry natural records of feeding location hidden in the chemistry of their scales.

Using this idea, the Southampton team, working with scientists from the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust (GWCT) and the National Oceanography Centre (NOC). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Bay of Fundy aquaculture venture faces protest from coalition

The government of Nova Scotia  has approved a salmon aquaculture project in St Mary's Bay on the outer limits of the Bay of Fundy. Cooke's Aquaculture has received approval from the federal and provincial environmental departments of the government. Part of the planned project is a CAN$150 (€107.547) million expansion that could create 400 jobs in the neighbouring province.

Protests have been voiced on the subject of the planned expansion by Cooke's Aquaculture "Salmon feedlots are expanding in Nova Scotia because disease and environmental problems have limited such opportunities in New Brunswick," said Matthew Abbott, project co-ordinator with NB based Fundy Baykeeper. "If Nova Scotians value their coastal environments and traditional fisheries, they need to act now to prevent aquaculture of this scale in their bays." Read more ...


This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Sea lice research show they can transfer waterborne infections

Studies carried out at the Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo have found that sea lice pass waterborne infections from one fish to anther. The early findings were disclosed to scientists attending an international conference on fish health at Vancouver Island Conference Centre.

"You can take one of those lice and move it into (a tank with) fish that have not been infected and there is some evidence you may transfer (pathogens) from fish to fish," said Mark Higgins, Department of Fisheries and Oceans research biologist. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Thursday, June 23, 2011

Saving wild Atlantic salmon by using new closed containment system

Bill Taylor, president of ASF, said: “With concerns growing over the impacts of salmon farming on threatened and endangered wild Atlantic salmon, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the future of salmon farming must lie in closed containment systems (CCS). ASF has decided to put our purse behind our policy and get involved in developing a promising new way to sustainably grow out healthy Atlantic salmon in closed containment facilities.”

The Atlantic Salmon Federation has joined forces with the Conservation Fund to attempt grow farmed Atlantic salmon in fresh water closed contaminant system. The Conservation fund has spent 20 years working on closed containment system for aquaculture rearing Perch, Trout and new Salmon. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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New model for aquaculture takes hold far from the sea

Aquaculture now produces 50 percent of the world fish needs, some companies are now working to reduce the environmental impact that fish farming is having. One of the ways looked at to reduce the effects of fish farming on the environment is closed containment fish farms.

In Massachusetts, Josh Goldman of a Australis Aquaculture gave an interview with Yale Environment 360. Located on the Connecticut River, more than 80 miles from the Atlantic Ocean, Turners Falls, Massachusetts is an unlikely setting to rear a seagoing fish. But that is precisely what Josh Goldman, co-founder and CEO of Australis Aquaculture, is doing, using some of the most sustainable aquaculture techniques in existence today. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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New Zealand a court hearing will set back aquaculture by years

A high court decision could hold up plans for expansion for marine farming in Tasman and Golden Bays by several years and may well require a new round of consultations and potential litigation. for 13 long years the parties that are opposed to expansion and the marine farm owners have been fighting it out. Now in a lengthy new interim decision giving the parties a month to respond, Justice Denis Clifford has suggested that the ministry's chief executive is the appropriate person to make the rulings. 

"That means that the ministry now has to go back and re-do the entire decision," counsel for the opponents of the expansion, Tony Stallard, said yesterday."My view is that we've been set back probably another two or three years, and where the matter is going to end up as the result of these new decisions, I do not know." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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The road to Halifax salmon farm protester

A75 strong group of protesters from the Save Our Bay Alliance  gathered outside Province House in Halifax to voice their concerns “We just wanted to get our message out,” says Karen Crocker, chair of the Save our Bays Alliance. “There was lot of media there and hopefully now Nova Scotians are a little better educated what our concerns are and that we have valid concerns.”

Sherry Pictou spoke at the rally on behalf of the Bear River First Nations.

“We have a long tradition of building relationships with our neighbouring communities. I had the full support of my chief and council to go there and express our disappointment at the process – it really makes me question the whole process of community consultation. We have never received any answers to any of the questions we asked over a year ago.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Canada: Ministry provides funding for aquaculture training programs for the First Nation

The Ministry of Advanced Education announced that grant funding awards will be available for training programs to support First Nations aquaculture workers. Thirty-six of the first nation workers will receive an assortment of training in shellfish technician, supervisory and management roles giving them the skills they need to access good jobs in the local communities.

The Province is providing CAN$300,000 (€216,010.771), in one time funding at Vancouver Island University CAN$167,750 (€120,786), Nicola Valley Institute of Technology CAN$110,000 (€79,203.949) and Northwest Community College CAN$23,250 (€16,740.835). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Aquaculture passes EU inspection on waste control

European inspectors from the Food and Veterinary Office (FVO) carried out assessments in Chile on the monitoring systems for waste and contaminants in live animals and animal products to the EU market. As for the National Fisheries Service (Sernapesca), the audit included visits to the Laboratory of Pharmacology from the University of Chile, to two fish processing plants and to a salmon farming center in the region of Los Lagos. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Wednesday, June 22, 2011

EU-funded bluefin tuna project positive and natural results

The European Union funded project with Bluefin tuna has for the second year spawned without any chemical help from the researchers. The team, from the Murcian Oceanographic Centre, part of the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO), are overjoyed at the success of the spawning.

The work being done is part of the SELFDOTT project ('From capture based to SELF-sustained aquaculture and Domestication Of bluefin tuna, Thunnus tynnus'). The fact that the spawning has now been obtained naturally two years in a row indicates that the 60-strong broodstock has reached a very important degree of domestication as a result of their 4-year stay in two floating cages 25 m wide by 20 m deep in the bay of El Gorguel (Cartagena). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Moving aquaculture off the grid the idea behind oyster farming

The idea behind oyster farming just like any type of farming is that when you have some control over elements like temperature, water and nourishment, you can speed up the rate at which the animal grows. Chris Starbird, a marine biologist who used to study sea turtles and island foxes, started Starbird Mariculture in 2007.

Starbird purchases seeds for Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from Washington State. At that point, they’re about two to three millimetres in diameter. During five month he will mature them to about 18 millimetres and then they are sold to the growers. I was surprised to learn that his operation is indeed a farm, in every sense. There’s the vocabulary (silo, trough), the list of unknowns that can make or break a season (weather, disease) and the unremitting list of strenuous and often precariously positioned tasks. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Cooke Aquaculture encouraged by open house major turnout

Hundreds of people crammed into the Sandy Point Community Hall on Monday evening to talk to company officials from Cooke Aquaculture about their plans for new fish farm sites in Jordan Bay and the development of a multi-million dollar fish processing facility in the area. Nell Halse, a spokesperson for the company, said "they were overwhelmed by the interest received from the event". The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) were needed to direct traffic because the turnout was so overwhelming.

“We welcome those conversations,” she said. Some who attended the open house were disappointed that the company did not do a presentation. Halse said that" they would be interested in talking to anyone who wants more information. We are very open to community groups who would want us to come in and do a presentation,” said Halse. The company recently received notice that its application for new fish farms was approved in St. Mary’s Bay. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Processing on catfish is down 35 percent

The results from a statistical survey by the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) showed that catfish processing was overall down 35 percent for farmed raised catfish. Net pounds of processed fish sold during May 2011 totaled 12.6 million pounds, down 34 percent from the comparable month in 2010. The total end of the month inventory decreased two percent from last month and was down 54 percent from a year ago.

The total fresh and frozen average price for May 2011 was US$3.51 (€2.34), up US$1.03 (€0.715) from a year ago. The May 2011 average price received by processors for total fresh fish was US$3.38 (€2.34) per pound, up 94 cents from last year. Fresh catfish fillet exports totaled 38.7 thousand pounds, with 33.6 thousand pounds going to Canada and the rest going to the Netherlands, Antilles and Nigeria. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


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Feed deliveries for catfish May 2011

The report on catfish feed deliveries showed that in the US during May 2011, catfish feed was down 22 percent and was only 50,068 tons from May 2010. It was up on last months figures at 65 percent, foodsize catfish feed delivered totalled 47,896 tons, down 21 percent from the corresponding month a year ago.

Fingerlings and broodfish totaled 2172 tons, down 32 percent. May feed delivered to Mississippi catfish growers for foodsize fish totaled 21,465 tons, down 27 percent from last year. This latest report from the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) gives a breakdown of all catfish breeders and the feed results. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Congress in move to ban Frankenfish

In general the scientific communities opinion was that the transgenic salmon was safe to consume. This transgenic fish that was created and designed to grow more rapid than a normal salmon and eat 10 to 25 percent less feed by adding the genes from two fish has caused a lot of debate. Its creators Aquabounty has maintained all along that it is safe to eat.

One of the major concerns related to this fish was that if it ever escaped into the wild , it would threaten the wild population in competition for food and a fish that can eat up to 25 percent less feed would have the edge against the wild salmon. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) supported the frankenfish, however Congress stamped it authority and is moving to ban the transgenic fish. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Final count-down for BioMarine Business Convention 2011

July 1, the meeting requests will open. Do not miss the opportunity to be listed in the partnering system, find out who’s who, select the companies you think would be great partners for you. In addition to your 1 to 1 meetings, debate with CEOs , R&D directors, top scientists, start ups, investors who will give the latest news on the marine bioresources potential and their economical impact

Showcase your company through a company presentation

Enter your special Aquafeed code (BM 038) and benefit from a delegation rate (€900 (US$1,294) instead of €1400 (US$2,013) and join us in Nantes- France from Sept 7-9, 2011 . All the marine bio-resources key companies will be there for program, speaker list and more information

http://convention.biomarine.org/

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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US spark Marine Farms expansion with demand for cobia

Marine Farms (Vietnam) the largest producer of farmed raised cobia in the world, are planning to increase their production facilities due to the surge in demand for cobia from the US. Mr Carlos Massad, general manager of Marine Farms, said "that sales of the company’s akvacobia brand has increased dramatically from 2268 Kg to 9072 Kg per month during the first four months of its official launch in the American market".

He also said that "the company had just leased a hatchery in the Nha Trang area to test out a larval rearing protocol, the first step in potentially building its own hatchery to increase its source of juveniles".  Mr Massad maintains that "the company is on track to expand capacity to 4,000 metric tons by 2014". Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Blue Frontiers: Managing the environmental costs of aquaculture a report

A new report published today June 21, 2011 is a comprehensive analysis of global aquaculture looking at all major species and farm production systems. The aim of this report called Blue Frontiers: Managing the environmental costs of aquaculture, is to inform the policy makers about the impacts of aquaculture on the environment and to stimulate debate.

The report was compiled for the purpose of informing and stimulating debates, discussions among the polices makers. It provides a global review and analysis of those issues for both coastal and freshwater aquaculture. These efforts can lead to a more ecologically sustainable industry an important goal, given the likely rapid growth in aquaculture production. They will also help ensure that aquaculture contributes fully to meeting our future needs for fish. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Salmon market update - May 2011

Chilean production of the Atlantic Salmon was less that half of the production in 2010, the figures showed that up to November 2010 there was a 54 percent reduction in the output of aquaculture in Chile. A similar trend was seen in coho salmon 51 percent up to November.

During 2010 the Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISA) spread through the Salmonid populations and this accounted for 40 percent of the population,  the total production for 2010 was 22 percent below the production of 2009 at 287,500 tons. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Neogen acquires new laboratory from GlycoMar Ltd

An American company Neogen who's European head-office is based in Scotland has acquired a seafood testing facilities VeroMara in Scotland as part of an expansion of its food safety operations. The laboratory based in Oban offers testing services to the aquaculture industries for shellfish toxins, foodborne pathogens such as E.coli.

"The acquisition of VeroMara deepens Neogen's advancement into the aquatic sciences," said James Herbert, Neogen's CEO and chairman. "VeroMara's services are complementary and a nice fit with our existing product lines for the seafood industry, including one of our biggest food safety diagnostic products our histamine tests for the tuna industry.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Newfoundland and Labrador lead the way

In the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, aquaculture has become a key industry worth over CAN$100 (€71.368 ) million. The growth levels have positioned the province as a national leader in the industry. Miranda Pryor the executive director of Newfoundland and Labrador Aquaculture Industry Association (NAIA), says"each job in the industry offers the potential to provide additional jobs in the aquaculture processing, supply and service sectors".

She points out that Atlantic salmon, steelhead trout, and blue mussel farms are continually expanding and developing new markets. "Demand for those products right now is at an all-time high". She also said that "the industry in the province operates to strict provincial and federal regulations" and that "they maintain the highest degree of bio-security protocols". Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Philippines aquaculture grows along with exports

The Philippines saw a growth of 6.6 percent last year in aquaculture, particularly in the seaweed business. The National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA 7) said that the expansion of seaweed farms in Bohol as well as extra fish ponds in various areas of the region help to increase production in aquaculture.

There was also a significant increase in marine exports and processed fruits by 46 percent in the first quarter of this year compared to 2010 at the same period. Exports of processed marine products in the first quarter of 2011 reached 41 percent higher than that of the same period last year.  Read more ...


This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Monday, June 20, 2011

The Coalition Government does not back British

Instead of serving Scottish Salmon at 10 Downing Street, and other government departments they have chosen to serve Alaskan salmon. This is because the government has been manipulated into pledging to buy only sustainable fish by a group of organisations coordinated by the group ‘Sustain’ that includes the Marine Conservation Society, the Marine Stewardship Council and Seafood Choices.

The buyers from any government would be able to see that Scottish salmon is actually sustainable, the fact that these so called organisations are not supporters of aquaculture means that any decent aquaculture product which is fully traceable and sustainable should be a choice that would make any government proud to buy. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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SalMar aquires Villa Milijølaks AS

SalMar announced its entry into an agreement to acquire 100 percent of the shares of Villa Miljølaks AS a fish farming company. Villa Miljølaks AS hold three fish farming licenses. Two for the production of organic salmon (awarded in the licensing round in 2009) and a research and development license that ends on December 31, 2012 in addition, the company operates an R & D license for Aalesund University College that runs until June 2012.

The R and D licenses are aimed at projects related to the wrasse/cleanerfish to combat sea lice in the salmon pens. It is also an area where the SalMar group hold considerable expertise, completion of the transaction is subject to due diligence, board approval and approval from competition authorities in Norway. The transaction is scheduled to be completed 11 July. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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