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Friday, November 30, 2012

Aquaculture view: On the Estimation of the Digestible Nutrient Contents of Finished Feeds


Aquaculture view

Aquaculture view is a column in each edition of International Aquafeed magazine (IAF), written by Dominique P Bureau.

Part of the IAF editorial panel, Dom has a PhD in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Guelph, Canada.

Today he teaches various undergraduate and graduate courses on animal nutrition and agriculture at the University of Guelph. Between 2007 and 2009, he coordinated the “Paris Semester”, a study abroad program for undergraduate students at the University of Guelph.

He serves on a number of international committees, including the US National Research Council Committee on Nutrient Requirements of Fish and Shrimp.





See all of the Aquaculture view columns here.

November - december 2012


On the Estimation of the Digestible Nutrient Contents of Finished Feeds

A very large proportion of aquaculture feed manufacturers are now formulating their feeds on a digestible nutrient basis. This progressive move from formulating on a ‘total nutrient’ basis to formulating on digestible nutrients is praiseworthy since it is providing a more rational basis for the production of cost-effective diets adequately meeting the nutrient requirements of animals.

Every year, an increasing amount of information of the digestibility of nutrients of different ingredients is becoming available. This information is informally compiled in a number of reference documents and increasingly used by commercial feed formulators. The question arises as to how reliable is the available information and how it is best used. In a context of very high feed commodities prices, the impact of overestimating or underestimating digestible nutrient contents of feed ingredients can translate into significant economical impacts.

For example, variations as low as two or three percentage points in the digestibility of protein or lipid sources can translate into variations of as much as $10 to 30 per tonne of feed produced, clearly not something negligible.

For years, the debate around estimates of apparent digestibility was on methodological issues (e.g., feces collection methods) and perhaps more important issues have been neglected. I wish to briefly highlight two of these issues in this column.

Ingredients, such as poultry by-products meal, feather meals, meat and bone meals, and DDGS are increasingly used in commercial aquaculture feed formulations. A substantial amount of information of the apparent digestibility of protein, amino acids and energy of these ingredients is available in the reference literature. However, these ingredients are produced using a wide variety of equipment and processing and drying conditions. Consequently, significant differences may exist in the apparent digestibility of nutrients amongst lots (batches) of these ingredients. Very little work has been done to meaningfully characterise the variability of the digestibility and nutritive value of different lots of the same ingredient. This is a major issue for feed manufacturers since these ingredients are frequently sourced from several different suppliers (brokers) and these suppliers, in turn, frequently source these ingredients from different manufacturing facilities.

Another important issue is the way by which the digestible nutrient contents of finished feeds can be computed. In feed formulation, the nutrient contributions of different ingredients are used to predict the concentration of nutrient (or energy) in the finished feed. The contribution of nutrients of different ingredient is thus assumed to be additive. It is common for nutritionists to assume that the digestible nutrients and energy contents of feeds can also be calculated as the sum of digestible nutrient and energy contributions of different feed ingredients (calculated from the quotient of incorporation level in the feed, the apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) and the nutrient content of the ingredient). While practical and generally effective, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that this type of approach may not be suitable for several types of nutrients.

A series of publications from the University of Guelph (Hua and Bureau. 2006. Aquaculture, 254: 455-465; Hua and Bureau. 2009. Aquaculture, 294: 282-287; Hua and Bureau. 2009. Aquaculture, 286: 271-276; Hua and Bureau 2010. Aquaculture, 308: 152-158) showed that the digestible phosphorus (P), starch and lipid contents of finished feeds could not be computed from the sum of expected digestible nutrient contributions of the different ingredients. This research indicated that the forms under which these nutrients were supplied (or found in the finished feeds), the levels and interactions between different forms of the nutrients, and the effect of some exogenous factors (e.g., water temperature, % gelatinization) had to be taken into account to accurately predict the digestible nutrient contents of finished feeds.

Fortunately, this research also showed that multiple regression equations provided a simple and practical approach of addressing this challenge. Equations where thus developed for predicting the digestible P, starch and lipid content of feeds manufactured using a wide array of feed ingredients. Unfortunately, most least-cost feed formulation software packages are not currently designed to carry out an optimization (least-costing) of the digestible P, starch and lipid contents of feeds on the basis of these equations.  However, these simple equations can be programmed into feed formulation software and the effects of changes in feed formulation on the digestible P, starch and lipid contents of the finished feeds be easily computed.

These issues should be on the radar screen of feed manufacturers and more systematic and commercially relevant work needs to be done by fish nutrition researchers on the important topic of estimating the digestible nutrient contents of feeds.

Hervé Balusson, founder of Olmix Group, France

Hervé Balusson founded Olmix Group in Brittany, France in 1995. Unusually for the time, Olmix developed natural alternatives to chemical additives used in agriculture. Using high quality trace elements,specific clays and macro-algae, the group created a wide range of natural products to substitute synthesis additives. Hervé Balusson, Olmix Group CEO, shares his views on the future of the company and difficulties faced by aquaculture.
Today, Olmix is one of the world’s main specialists in 'green chemistry' and is one of the pioneers of the 'blue biotechnology'. Olmix has 12 subsidiaries worldwide, is present in 60 countries and employs 250 people. The Breton SME reached a turnover of €53m in 15 years, of which 80 percent was exported sales.  The company is well established in Asia where it achieves a 30 percent growth by year on average. In fact, the ASEAN area represents an increasing share of the group’s turnover. Olmix Group is listed on the Paris Stock Exchange and has seven production plants in Europe.

This interview appeared in the May June 2012 edition of International Aquafeed magazine



After 15 years of algae valorization, what are your observations?

Hervé Balusson (Olmix Group CEO): When I began to get interested in macro-algae, 15 years ago, people believed I was a marginal. However, the sea is unquestionably an amazing source of 'blue biotechnology'. The number of algae species in the world is estimated at almost one million. At the outset of the new millennium, the study of algae is one of the most promising ways to provide answers to mankind issues such as environmental, food and energy challenges. Nature has already the answers to take up these challenges.
Renewable biomasses, algae are rich in proteins, carbohydrates, trace elements and especially in active principles often underestimated.
Algae reflect the company’s philosophy as sustainable solutions: thanks to algae, Olmix is able to provide natural, efficient and universal solutions. By 'universal', I mean that our products have the capacity to adapt to various types of production, in different contexts.
The macro-algae high potential combined with our mastery in sourcing and industrial processes led us to technological breakthrough, to the development of numerous innovations and revolutionary products, particularly by the association of the mineral and the organic.
Our group has the advantage of being able to promptly launch its new technology at competitive prices on the market thanks to our well established international sales team. This territorial anchorage gives company open-mindedness and dynamism.

Aquaculture is today facing some challenges, what solutions do you provide?

Increasing production, fishmeal replacement, high quality products requirement (in compliance with standards and certifications), feed efficiency improvement, pathologies limitation, maintaining water quality … These are the challenges the aquaculture sector is facing today.
Olmix proposes solutions in line with the market concerns and provides a full range of products intended for aquaculture.
Fish meal replacement has for example generated a new problematic, previously unknown, the mycotoxins risk management, linked to recourse to plant origin commodities. MTX+ responds to this new demand by supplying an effective and reliable solution to control this risk.
The innovative nature of our products is intrinsically related to valuation of both nutritional and functional algae properties which ensure effectiveness and originality.
Solutions provided by Olmix are universal and meet the feed millers and farmers needs and are besides the result of a privileged relationship based on our proximity with our different partners.

Is the future of Olmix linked to algae valorization?

The group’s medium and long-term development is indeed predicated on the implementation of a complete sector for macro-algae valorization.
This year we are starting a large-scale project, the 'Industrial Strategic Innovation' program from Oséo called ULVANS, gathering 5 companies (OLMIX, PRP, MELSPRING, AMADEITE, AGRIVAL) and two French academic partners (South Brittany University, National Centre of Scientific Research from Mulhouse).
The aim of the ULVANS project is to create a sea lettuce valorization sector, from the harvesting to the marketing of innovative products destined for the animal and vegetable nutrition and health markets.

Health through algae, a new challenge for Olmix?

Our expertise in the knowledge and the mastering of active principles stemming from macro-algae opened up new fields of application. The group’s Research and Development teams focus today on the valorization of our innovations in the health sector.
The sea must be considered as an infinite reservoir of solutions, it contains the potential to solve major health issues.
'Health through algae' is the founding concept of the new Amadéite company which is developing breakthrough products dedicated to control animal and vegetable pathologies (immunostimulation, anti-infective agents, elicitation effect).

Video: Hurray Hallam's Practical Aquaponics

I know we've featured aquaponic projects on the blog before but I thought it would be nice to share this video of a really well-established farm. Murray Hallam talks us through his Practical Aquaponics farm in Australia and some success stories. There are some huge paw paw and tomatoes. Murray also has a website and blog which is full of useful tips and advice.


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30/11/12: Sea lice pesticides approved in Canada; NZ aquaculture advent calendar; Spain celebrates National Aquaculture Day

Hello, 
  • Salmon farmers in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada have been granted emergency permission to use a pesticide to control sea lice. Health Canada has allowed to farmers to use Salmosan after an outbreak of sea lice in farmed salmon due to increased water temperatures. Read more...
    Oyster from Marennes-Oléron
    Oyster from Marennes-Oléron (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
  • Check out this twist on the traditional advent calendar. Aquaculture New Zealand is counting down to Christmas with a nurtured seafood advent calendar. Each day in December leading up to the 25th, the homepage of the organisation's website will feature a different recipe starring premium New Zealand aquaculture products – Greenshell Mussels, New Zealand Salmon and Pacific Oysters. “This is the taste of summer,” said Aquaculture New Zealand CEO Gary Hooper. “Light, fresh, healthy and perfect for sharing with friends and family. Grown in your backyard, our mussels, salmon and oysters are quality Kiwi favourites – and with a little culinary inspiration they can be the star of your barbecue or dinner party.” Read more...
  • Spain is celebrating its first National Aquaculture Day today. Organised by the OESA Foundation there are more than 30 activities taking place throughout the country. Visit the website to find out what's going on.
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Biomin

Digestarom® is the phytogenic product line of Biomin. Digestarom® is based on carefully selected components, combined and standardized using advanced tools to guarantee efficient formulas. Click on the image to learn more.

Thursday, November 29, 2012

New factory to bring jobs to Timaru

Geoff Matthews, CEO of Mt. Cook Alpine Salmon Limited has announced that the company has commissioned the building of a new $6m salmon-processing factory in Timaru, to be opened in April 2013.

Mr. Matthews made the announcement at the South Canterbury Chamber of Commerce, Top Table function in Timaru, where he was guest speaker.

“The new factory will be commissioned in stages initially bringing 35 new jobs to Timaru and a further 40 jobs to follow, as Mt. Cook Alpine Salmon expands its production and an added-value smoke house is also commissioned in three to four years time,” he says.

Geoff Matthews says the site in Sheffield Street, and builder Chris Broadhead of Chris Broadhead Building Ltd, were chosen after an extensive twelve-month search and planning process, in which Mt. Cook Alpine Salmon evaluated a large number of options.

“Geographically we looked at a triangle between Twizel, as far south as Oamaru, and as far north as Rangiora. In the end the economics of basing a plant in Timaru, coupled with a skilled stable workforce meant that it was the best option.”

Mr. Matthews says that Mt. Cook Alpine Salmon is in the middle of a $20 million dollar capital expansion and it was always part of the companyʼs business plan to become vertically integrated.
“We see the commissioning of our own factory as a critical component of becoming masters of our own destiny, and to obtaining the best possible price for our product overseas,” he says.
Mr. Matthews says that commissioning of the plant in New Zealand is also bringing jobs back onshore.
Plans for the new factory

“Currently 80 percent of our export production has secondary processing in Indonesia. However, bringing jobs back onshore is not without its challenges,” he says.

“The challenge for us as a company is to up-skill our work force to meet and ideally exceed, the exacting standards that we currently obtain from our world-class processor, BMI, in Indonesia.”
“Commissioning the plant is therefore a vote of confidence in a New Zealand workforce.”

Geoff Matthews says that the plant will be export certified to the highest standards to be able to export to the key international markets of Australia, Asia, Europe and United States. The plant will also need to be certified to the Global Aquaculture Allianceʼs (GAA) Best Aquaculture Practice (BAP) standards.

“Earlier this week we announced that the Mt. Cook Alpine Salmonʼs farming operation has become the first aquaculture facility in Australasia to be GAA BAP certified, so our plant will also need to complete this certification.”

Matthews says the new plant has been designed to process, at full capacity, 3,500 metric tonnes of harvested fish, and to be as flexible as possible to ensure the company can take advantage of changes in markets needs.

Geoff Matthews said the willingness of the council and business community to engage with Mt. Cook Alpine Salmon also assisted greatly in the final decision to built in Timaru. “The company was very honoured to win the Supreme Award at the South Canterbury Business Excellence Awards,” he said.
Mr. Matthews also praised the commitment to the project by both builder Chris Broadhead, and Michael Broadhead of Lines in Designs. “Chris and Michael have worked extremely hard to get this deal across the line, and has been able to provide us a fantastic design and build option.”


More information...


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29/11/12: Stories in rainbow trout in Lebanon and shellfish in Washington

Hello, 
  • Rainbow trout may not be native to Lebanon but farming the species is flourishing in the Orontes river in the Bekka Valley. The area is home to around 150 trout farms, which employ1,000 people, making fish breeding the biggest agricultural sector in the area. This article is a great overview of how the industry works in Lebanon. Read more...
  • Ocean acidification is of major concern to shellfish farmers in Washington state, USA. Increased levels of CO2 damage shellfish shells, threatening the industry. A state report into the issue highlights that Washington must think globally— pressing with partners abroad and at home for a strategy to reduce carbon dioxide emissions — and act locally by acting to cut down agricultural chemicals, storm-water and waste-water runoffs going into the state’s marine waters.   Read more...



Fresh shellfish for sale
Fresh shellfish for sale (Photo credit: Joel Abroad)

While not native to Lebanon, or the region, freshwater rainbow trout can be found in abundance at the headwaters of the Orontes river, in the Bekaa Valley.
The Lebanese section of the river stretches some 25 km from its source, close to Hermel, to Lebanon’s northeastern border with Syria, and it has become the top site in the country for raising the fatty fish, as the water there is deep and relatively clean.
The Orontes is the fastest flowing river in the country, with an average of around 660 cubed meters of water flowing every minute, and the temperature is also the most suitable for raising trout, ranging between 12 and 16 C. This unique water environment in Lebanon is ideal for the species, which only lives in flowing water that is deep and clean.
There are around 150 fish breeding farms along the Orontes basin, providing the only source of income to over 300 families and more than 1,000 jobs – from supervising the farms, raising the fish, transporting them to markets to distributing them to shops.
Annual production ranges from 1,000-1,500 tons, with the price of a ton at around $4,000.
Agricultural engineer Malek Nassereddine says that fish breeding is the biggest agricultural sector in the area of Hermel, and that trout might in the future be the major product produced in the area, as the conditions there are so ideal for the fish, which would help boost the economy of this poor and underdeveloped area.


Read more: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/Culture/Lifestyle/2012/Nov-28/196324-rainbow-trout-aquaculture-growing-in-bekaa-valley.ashx#ixzz2DbZ0Wk9B
(The Daily Star :: Lebanon News :: http://www.dailystar.com.lb)
While not native to Lebanon, or the region, freshwater rainbow trout can be found in abundance at the headwaters of the Orontes river, in the Bekaa Valley.
The Lebanese section of the river stretches some 25 km from its source, close to Hermel, to Lebanon’s northeastern border with Syria, and it has become the top site in the country for raising the fatty fish, as the water there is deep and relatively clean.
The Orontes is the fastest flowing river in the country, with an average of around 660 cubed meters of water flowing every minute, and the temperature is also the most suitable for raising trout, ranging between 12 and 16 C. This unique water environment in Lebanon is ideal for the species, which only lives in flowing water that is deep and clean.
There are around 150 fish breeding farms along the Orontes basin, providing the only source of income to over 300 families and more than 1,000 jobs – from supervising the farms, raising the fish, transporting them to markets to distributing them to shops.
Annual production ranges from 1,000-1,500 tons, with the price of a ton at around $4,000.
Agricultural engineer Malek Nassereddine says that fish breeding is the biggest agricultural sector in the area of Hermel, and that trout might in the future be the major product produced in the area, as the conditions there are so ideal for the fish, which would help boost the economy of this poor and underdeveloped area.


Read more: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/Culture/Lifestyle/2012/Nov-28/196324-rainbow-trout-aquaculture-growing-in-bekaa-valley.ashx#ixzz2DbZ0Wk9B
(The Daily Star :: Lebanon News :: http://www.dailystar.com.lb)
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Event: The Aquarama jigsaw takes shape

Image of a Banggai cardinalfish. Pterapogon ka...
Image of a Banggai cardinalfish. Pterapogon kauderni. Taken at Lembeh Straits, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
As the pace towards Aquarama 2013 steadily quickens, the various pieces of the complex jigsaw are beginning to fall into place. Two key components of what promises to be a fascinating and all-embracing programme are the:

• Trade Seminars
• International Fish Competition
The 2013 Trade Seminars will have as their overall theme: CURRENT AQUATICS – FUTURE PERSPECTIVES, consisting of three separate sessions:

Session 1: Industry-related Conservation – some of the topics currently lined up feature hot issues like the ongoing studies on the plight of the much-in-demand Banggai cardinalfish and the in-situ work being done in Indonesia to conserve the species, the Amazonian ornamental fishery, conservation and management strategies for Indian ornamental fish, and CITES and CBD issues surrounding the dragon fish.

Session 2: Health and Biosecurity in the Ornamental Aquatic Industry – topics include biosecurity issues in Australia (including potential import consequences for ornamental fish), fish health management in commercial premises, barcoding of ornamental fish…and others.

Session 3: Husbandry and Legislation – topics to include governmental perspectives on the ornamental aquatic industry, the live rock trade, wild-caught and captive-bred seahorses, nano aquaria, Brazilian legislation and the next CITES Conference of the Parties.

The line-up of speakers for these presentations is now almost complete and includes, as always, international industry leaders and experts (so far, from Australia, Indonesia, Brazil, the Netherlands, Belgium, Mexico, India, the US, Norway and, of course, Singapore). As in previous editions of Aquarama, the seminars - which are absolutely free to all trade visitors - promise to provide a wealth of topical and essential information regarding the industry, and are certainly not to be missed.

Turning to the International Fish Competition, it will, as ever, include competitive elements other than fish. Prominent among these are the Freshwater Planted Tank Competition, the Marine Tank Competition, the 2011-launched Freshwater Nano Tank Competition and the brand-new Marine Nano Tank Competition. Also new will be the inclusion of several commercial classes and categories in the fish competition section.

These have been included to provide trade visitors with competitive displays of the types and quality of fish that they can order for their customers from Singapore suppliers. Also – and in keeping with Aquarama’s commitment to keeping up with the latest trends, its famous and prestigious dragon fish competition will include a class dedicated to the ‘new generation’ Gold Head Crossbacks which made their first appearance in 2011 within the long-established Crossback Golden class.

The Registration Forms for all the categories and classes are being finalised and will shortly be published. Interested parties are urged to check the Aquarama website regularly for the latest updates.

More information... 


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BioMar

BioSustain is BioMar's sustainable development programme. The company hopes to achieve this through:
  • Advanced technology
  • Superior knowledge
  • Certified management systems
  • Challenging improvement targets
Click on the image to learn more.











Wednesday, November 28, 2012

28/11/12: Stories about the Philippines; feed and sustainable aquaculture; IMTA

Hello, 
  • An aquaculture park in the Philippines is reportedly benefitting local cage culture. The newly established aquaculture park along the Magat reservoir in Gen. Aguinaldo village in Isabela’s Ramon town is seen to revive the one-flourishing fish cage industry in the area. Jovita Ayson, regional director of the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources in Cagayan Valley, told the Business Mirror that the park has industrial estates wherein aquaculture plots are leased or awarded to investors, with the government providing infrastructure , utilities and technical services. Read more...
  • Could waste from Norwegian salmon production find a use in IMTA? Researchers at the 'Integrated open seawater aquaculture, technology for sustainable culture of high productive areas (INTEGRATE)' project think so. At present, respiratory products, faeces and uneaten feed worth NOK 6 billion are discharged into Norwegian coastal waters. The researchers have studied whether this waste can be put to use as nutrients for cultivating kelp and/or mussels. Read more...
    Provinces and regions of the Philippines
    Provinces and regions of the Philippines (Photo credit: Wikipedia)









The Aquaculture Protein Centre (APC) was among the initial 13 Norwegian Centres of Excellence (SFF) established. After ten years, its activities as an SFF centre are now drawing to a close. The centre was established to generate the knowledge needed to be able to replace fishmeal in aquaculture feeds. After ten years, the proportion of fish-based ingredients has been reduced to roughly ten per cent, while fish farmers have doubled their production. Fish going vegetarian APC Director Margareth Øverland believes that climate change and the increasing global need for food have given new urgency to the need to find feed ingredients that cannot be used directly as human food. The APC has shown that fish production is possible without the use of fishmeal. "In trials with rainbow trout, we've recently achieved normal growth rates with feed that contains no fishmeal," says Dr Øverland. "The fish showed no signs of disease either." Nevertheless she believes that fish feed of the future will still contain some marine ingredients, both to make the feed taste better to the fish and to ensure that the fish contain healthy omega fatty acids. "Salmon, our main production species, is not adapted to a vegetarian diet by nature. So it is critical that we find out how vegetable proteins affect fish growth, digestion and the immune system. One challenge is that plants contain anti-nutrients, which are substances that protect the plants from pests and disease, but which also inhibit fish growth and can trigger gut inflammation." Important discoveries

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-fish-sustainable-aquaculture.html#jCp
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Tuesday, November 27, 2012

27/11/12: Stories from Scotland, Uganda and Brazil

Hello,
We go all around the world today with stories from Scotland, Uganda and Brazil.
  • Scottish fish producer, Loch Duart is to receive a £4 million cash injection from Scottish Investment Bank (SIB) and Capicorn Investment Group. The company will upgrade equipment and infrastructure with the hope of increasing export sales. Read more...
  • Researchers target pangasius to revitalise Uganda's fish sector. Tilapia and the African catfish are the most commonly reared fish species in the country but experts see potential in pangasius. There is high demand for the fish on the world market and being an omnivore means the risk posed by escapees is lower compared to predator species. Read more...
  • Brazilian company Nutec has launched a system to convert fish waste into oil for biodiesel feedstock. The Biopeixe Machine converts 50 percent of fish viscera into fats which will be changed into biodiesel.The equipment will be used to dispose of waste made by Nile tilapia grown in tanks in the reservoirs of the State of Ceará.  Read more...

English: Pangasius hypothalamus meat in a Germ...
English: Pangasius hypothalamus meat in a German fish shop (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


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Monday, November 26, 2012

26/11/12: USA special

Hello,
We've got a US-themed blog today with stories from Florida, Canada and South Dakota.

  • Research at California State University, Fresno into the biology of tilapia, a fish species widely farmed for food, is getting a $349,000 boost with a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant to the Department of Biology within the College of Science and Mathematics. Larry Riley, assistant professor of biology, is researching the hormonal control of appetite and growth during stress in tilapia. Read more... 
  • A $16 million organic shrimp farm promises to bring 'green' jobs to Fellsmere, Florida. It's hoped that the jumbo shrimp can help rejuvenate and diversify a citrus-based economy often plagued by canker, citrus 'greening' and weather extremes. If grants come through and the methods Florida Organic Aquaculture tests prove effective, shrimp could be on the market by the middle of next year. Company executives say the farm will create an estimated 60 jobs on the farm and an additional 512 jobs from associated economic activity. Read more...
  • Research into soy-based fish feed could kick-start the fish-farming industry in South Dakota and provide a new market for soybean farmers. Researchers at San Diego State University are halfway through a three-year, $1.7 million research project into using soy as fishmeal replacement. Read more...
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shrimp-heads-dau-tom
shrimp-heads-dau-tom (Photo credit: Phú Thịnh Co)

Friday, November 23, 2012

Aqualabo

Aqualabo makes senors and equipment to monitor water quality. Click on the image to find out more.


Video: GOAL 2012

The Friday video this week comes from the Global Aquaculture Alliance's GOAL 2012 conference in Bangkok, Thailand.

There are a host of videos on the GAA YouTube channel but our pick is Norm Grant, executive chairman of the Seafood Importers Association of Australasia. Grant speaks about hoe importers can break into the Australian fish market.


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23/11/12: Awards and conferences

Hello, 
  • Today's conference on 'European aquaculture: the path for growth' organised in La Coruña, Spain by the European Commission will be streamed via the internet. Commissioner Maria Damanaki participates in the event, together with the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environment of Spain and the Presidency of the Government of Galicia. Listen live...
  • The European Probiotic Association (EPA) has awarded the Jules Tournut Probiotics Prize 2012 to Peter de Schryver, from Ghent University, for his innovative research project on the use of microbial products and microorganisms in animal nutrition. The prize was awarded in presence of members of the EPA, FEFANA, representative of the EPA Scientific Committee and journalists at EuroTier in Hannover last week. Altogether, the quality and diversity of research projects submitted demonstrate that probiotics benefits go beyond zootechnical performance and pave the way for innovative applications in the field of immunity, but also stress management or even reproduction. The prize worth €2000 is awarded to young scientists from all countries working on probiotics with a PhD or Master Thesis published in 2010/12. More information...
    Maria Damanaki
    Maria Damanaki (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Thursday, November 22, 2012

22/11/12: Stories on shrimp farms and mangroves, pangasius in Pakistan, grouper viruses

Hello, 
  • Shrimp farms threaten mangroves according to a UN report. Mangrove forests offer natural protection to coastlines, provide habitats of sealife and help slow climate change. However, since the 1980s, a fifth of mangroves have been destroyed due, in part, to the spread of shrimp and fish farms. Read more...
  • A three-year project examining the prospect of introducing the catfish (Pangasius pangasius) into Pakistan has received a Rs3.954 million research grant from the Higher Education Commission. The research will be lead by Dr Noor Khan, The University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences Assistant Professor Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, Pakistan. Under the project artificial feed will be formulated and prepared for various age groups and evaluated for its effect on the growth, nutrient profile and breeding potential of this specie. Read more...
  • This study on viruses in grouper is very interesting. The species (Epinephelus spp) is economically important worldwide but viral pathogens such as nervous necrosis virus (NNV) have caused severe infections in the fish, resulting in great loss in the grouper aquaculture industry. Despite this loss, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of NNV is still inadequate, mainly due to insufficient genomic information of the host. Read more...
    Epinephelus malabaricus
    Epinephelus malabaricus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)








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Alltech

Alltech focuses on natural scientific solutions to today’s biggest agriculture and food industry challenges. Headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky, Alltech has offices and distributors in 128 countries; three bioscience centers; and 32 manufacturing facilities located strategically throughout the world.  Click on the image to learn more.

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Wednesday, November 21, 2012

21/11/12: Stories on Kenya's aquaculture plans, AgriMarine's Norwegian deal, ethorobtics

Hello, 
  • The Kenyan fishing farming industry is set for a major overhaul after a bill for aquaculture legislation was tabled in parliament. The Fisheries Bill aims to formalise policies outlined in 2008 that give key interventions to increase the production and exploitation of the underutilised areas and aquaculture development. It also seeks to establish the Kenya Oceans and Fisheries Council as well as put in place a monitoring and surveillance unit to monitor the implementation of the policy and law. Read more...
  • AgriMarine and Akvatech have signed a purchasing and licensing agreement for AgriMarine's closed containment technology in Norway and other European countries. The deal includes a CAD $2.5 million loan, European IP rights and tank sales. “This agreement with Akvatech not only validates our IP and signals the immediate sale of two AgriMarine tanks for use in Norway, and it also sets the stage for future tank sales and expansion throughout Europe”, says Sean Wilton, President and CEO of AgriMarine. “We are confident that the transaction will also bolster further support and interest from salmon producing companies in other territories such as Southeast Asia and Australia”. Mr. Wilton adds, “We believe that we have the answer to sustainable salmon farming with substantial operational advantages in terms of reduced mortalities, improved feed conversion, and mitigation of sea lice infestations.” More information...
  • I've learnt a new word today: ethorobotics. This is the study of how robotic animal interact with their real life counter parts.  Researchers at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University studied how robot zebrafish can either attract or repel real zebrafish. Find out more about the results...

Danio rerio, better known as the zebrafish
Danio rerio, better known as the zebrafish (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
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Tuesday, November 20, 2012

20/11/12: News stories on antibiotics, shrimp bans and Global GAP certification

Hello, 
  • The use of antibiotics in aquaculture is on the rise as farmers seek ways to improve the health of their fish. However, growing resistance to antibiotics is also on the increase. With this is mind, this article on phys.org is very relevant. The article focuses on Syed Qaswar Ali Shah's doctoral research project on the genetic foundation for resistance to antibiotics in bacteria isolated from salmon in Norway. Read more...
  • Vietnamese authorities are seeking clarification as why China has banned the import of fresh shrimp from the country. No state agency in Vietnam was aware of the ban until a seafood company told the Ministry of Industry and Trade that one of its shipment had been rejected. Chinese agencies have said that Vietnamese shrimp may contain viruses, the exports do not adhere to Chinese rules and Vietnam has failed to provide information on shrimp culture. Read more...
  • More good news for Huon Aquaculture.  The Tasmania-based fish farm has become the first salmon producer in Australia to receive Global GAP accreditation. The certification means the company has passed Global GAP's assessment of quality. The news comes on top of being awarded ‘Tasmanian Exporter of the Year’ award last month. Read more...




Since the antibiotics that are used in veterinary medicine and aquaculture belong to the same group of antibiotics as those used in medicines for humans, increased resistance to these medicines will be detrimental to public health. Syed Qaswar Ali Shah's doctoral research project has studied the genetic foundation for resistance to antibiotics in bacteria isolated from salmon fish in Norway. He collected quinolone-resistant isolates of the bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum from rainbow trout and equivalent isolates of Yersinia ruckeri from Atlantic salmon. These bacteria are the cause of bacterial coldwater disease in rainbow trout and redmouth disease in salmon respectively. Only a limited number of antibiotic agents are authorised for use in aquaculture. The development of resistance to quinolones must lead to restrictions in the use of this drug in the aquaculture industry, heightened focus on the prevention of infection and the development of a vaccine against Flavobacterium psychrophilum so that infection is avoided.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-antimicrobial-resistance-fish-pathogenic-bacteria.html#jCp
Staphylococcus aureus - Antibiotics Test plate
Staphylococcus aureus - Antibiotics Test plate (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
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Monday, November 19, 2012

Event: 6th International Algae Congress

Microalgae have been of major interest for producing biofuels in the last decade. Recently, development and focus was changed towards the use of microalgae in the food, feed, materials and chemical sector as well. The potential of micro algae and aquatic biomass is enormous. The developments follow each other in rapid succession.

Microalgae contain high amounts of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates, which all can be used for different markets. For biofuels only, microalgae production appears to be too costly but in a biorefinery concept where the different compounds are isolated, algal biofuels remain a feasible option. Worldwide basic research, pilot and demonstration projects are developed. The industry is working on the basic aspects to make commercial production of microalgae possible. Very interesting will be the speech of Dr. Schoondorp, professor new business development at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences in Groningen. She will present a new kind of business model in which money is not the only exchange unit. The art of cooperation is one of the pillars new business is based on.
 

During the 6th International Algae Congress in Rotterdam, many developments in the field are shown by presentations of the larger projects inside and outside Europe. Mr. Olivares, Executive Director of the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts, a consortium of over 30 institutions will inform the delegates about the ambitious projects in USA.

The GreenStars Project has the goal to develop by 2020 compounds of interest such as efficient biofuels and high added value substances with microalgae feeding on industrial emissions of carbon dioxide and nutrients contained in waste. As soon as 2016, GreenStars will have industrial prototypes based on state-of-the-art technologies that will allow building a viable economic and environmental model. Dr. Siaut, member of the Biocore project team is speaker at the Rotterdam congress.


For North West Europe, the EnAlgae four-year Strategic Initiative of 19 partners and 14 observers is developing sustainable technologies for algal biomass production, bioenergy and greenhouse gas
(GHG) mitigation. Dr. Solanki (Birmingham University), Dr. Champenois (CEVA) and Mr. de Visser (Wageningen UR) tell us about their promising projects.


Basic research questions are discussed as well as demonstration projects. The congress addresses scalability and sustainability of the process of algae production and refinery. Seven different sessions are planned with industry representatives as well as leading algae research representatives. On December 5th in the afternoon a site visit to the algae plant in Lelystad (ACRRES) is part of the programme.


More information...

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Aller Aqua

Aller Aqua has a wide range of fish feed for freshwater and saltwater fish – for example fish feed for rainbow trout, carp, tilapia, catfish, seabass, seabream, cod, halibut, turbot, ell, rockfish, salmon and sturgeon. Click on the image to visit the Aller Aqua website.

19/11/12: News stories from Indonesia, New Zealand and Canada

Hello,
We're back after a very successful EuroTier and have many exciting things to follow up on. But for now, here's our news round-up:
  • A two-year project funded by the AusAID Public Sector Linkages Program has got underway in the South East Sulawesi region, Indonesia. The programme aims to help adapt and improve aquaculture farming practices in the face of mining and forestry activity which threatens the marine environment. The programme involves a partnership between the Fisheries Department, Dinas Kelautan dan Perikanan, the University of Haluoleo in Indonesia and the Victorian Department of Primary Industries and Deakin University, Australia. More information...
  • Research to domesticate the New Zealand GreenshellTM mussel is now marketable thanks to a new NZ$26 million agreement. The Ministry for Primary Industries and SPATnz have signed a seven year innovation contract to selectively breed mussel spat at the Cawthron Aquaculture Park north of Nelson, using research established by Cawthron’s MBIE-funded Cultured Shellfish Programme. “It’s fantastic that research into product enhancement for GreenshellTM mussels will now be able to be used to benefit the New Zealand mussel industry and help it take off internationally,” Cawthron Chief Executive Professor Charles Eason says. “It’s possibly the most exciting thing to happen in the mussel industry for decades – it will propel it forward.” Read more... 
  • Closed containment salmon farms are fairly common in Chile and Denmark but there is one commercial-scale, land-based fish for Atlantic salmon in North America. The Namgis Closed Containment Salmon Farm is set to house 23,000 Atlantic salmon smolts. This article by the Vancouver Sun gives a good overview of the farm and its activities. Read more...
Twenty-three thousand Atlantic salmon smolts will arrive at the ’Namgis First Nation’s salmon farm in January, just a fraction of the millions of similar fish that grow to maturity each year in B.C.
What’s different about these fish is that they will never swim in the ocean, never come in contact with wild salmon and never be treated for sea lice.
’Namgis Closed Containment Salmon Farm is the first commercial-scale, land-based fish farm for Atlantic salmon in North America. It’s part of a global trend of large closed-containment farms also being pursued in Denmark and in Chile.
The ’Namgis smolts will grow to maturity in just 12 to 15 months in a facility nearing completion not far from Port McNeill on Vancouver Island. The ’Namgis farm uses five 500-cubic-metre tanks capable of producing a total 500 tonnes of fish each year.
The system is the first of five identical modules to be built on the site, when the designs and systems are proven, for total capacity of 2,500 tonnes a year, about the same as a net-pen salmon farm.
Despite the extra costs associated with land-based salmon farming, the product needn’t cost much more than net-pen Atlantic salmon. The carefully controlled environment in an advanced closed-containment system allows the fish grow to maturity twice as fast, in a smaller space with less feed than net-pen salmon.


Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Salmon+farming+comes+ashore+land+based+aquaculture/7562924/story.html#ixzz2Cezob673
Twenty-three thousand Atlantic salmon smolts will arrive at the ’Namgis First Nation’s salmon farm in January, just a fraction of the millions of similar fish that grow to maturity each year in B.C.
What’s different about these fish is that they will never swim in the ocean, never come in contact with wild salmon and never be treated for sea lice.
’Namgis Closed Containment Salmon Farm is the first commercial-scale, land-based fish farm for Atlantic salmon in North America. It’s part of a global trend of large closed-containment farms also being pursued in Denmark and in Chile.
The ’Namgis smolts will grow to maturity in just 12 to 15 months in a facility nearing completion not far from Port McNeill on Vancouver Island. The ’Namgis farm uses five 500-cubic-metre tanks capable of producing a total 500 tonnes of fish each year.
The system is the first of five identical modules to be built on the site, when the designs and systems are proven, for total capacity of 2,500 tonnes a year, about the same as a net-pen salmon farm.
Despite the extra costs associated with land-based salmon farming, the product needn’t cost much more than net-pen Atlantic salmon. The carefully controlled environment in an advanced closed-containment system allows the fish grow to maturity twice as fast, in a smaller space with less feed than net-pen salmon.


Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Salmon+farming+comes+ashore+land+based+aquaculture/7562924/story.html#ixzz2Cezob673
Mussels at Trouville fish market
Mussels at Trouville fish market (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
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Event: 2012 Novus WAS Internship Challenge

Novus International, Inc. is sponsoring the Novus World Aquaculture Society (WAS) Internship programme. Aquaculture has a bright future, as it represents the fastest growing animal production industry. Novus recognises the need for the industry to attract and educate talented individuals to become future aqua research scientists and nutritionists. This internship program represents an investment by Novus into the future of the aquaculture industry. All eligible candidates are encouraged to apply by December 15, 2012. Selected recipient will be announced in Nashville at Aquaculture 2013. More information...


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Friday, November 16, 2012

Video: Farming waters, changing lives

Climate change - sea level rise - increased salinity; these are some of the challenges to development in Bangladesh. The CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems is working in Bangladesh to help small-scale fish farmers improve their lives through better farming practices.

Traditionally Bangladeshi women are looked down on if they work the ponds, but this hasn't deterred Banlata Das from grabbing the chance to lift her family out of poverty.


An inspiring and thought-provoking film from the guys at WorldFish.

This video is part of a playlist. Other videos include Stephan Hall of WorldFish sharing his thoughts on the industry.

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16/11/12: cosmetics from IMTA; altering timing of sea lice treatment aids salmon health; BioMarine report online

Hello,
  • A new cosmetic product made from IMTA seaweeds is causing a stir. Exsymol S.A.M., Monaco, has been working with Dr Theirry Chopin, an IMTA expert based in Canada to develop a multi-use product from the kelp, Alaria esculenta. The kelp is grown at the IMTA sites of Cooke Aquaculture Inc. in the Bay of Fundy. Exsymtal® has a variety of applications based on its anti-aging, anti-pollution/anti-stress, dermis filler and dermis renewal properties. More information...
  • The final report from the BioMarine Business Convention is now available online. The report includes the proceedings from the five think tanks and a round. Invaluable to those who were there, interesting for those who weren't. Download the report and view photos from the convention here.
  • At last, some good news about salmon farming. Researchers from the University of Alberta, Canada have found that changing the timing of sea lice treatment improved the health of farmed Atlantic salmon in British Columbia and helped wild pink salmon to stocks to begin recovery. Over the last decade, farmers have gradually shifted anti-parasite treatments to the autumn and winter. As a result, there are fewer sea lice in coastal waters as juvenile pink salmon migrate in the spring. Read more...
There has long been concern that concentrations of sea lice in BC's fish farming pens spread to wild fish stock in surrounding waters. The researchers discovered that by changing the timing of sea lice treatments, one salmon farming region not only improved the health of their farm Atlantic salmon - the action has helped the struggling population of wild pink salmon to begin recovering. The research was focused on salmon farming operations in one specific area of the BC coast, the Broughton Archipelago, which lies between the mainland and the northern tip of Vancouver Island. The researchers describe the area as the historic ground zero for studying the impacts of aquaculture on wild Pacific salmon. Over the past decade, salmon farmers in the area have gradually shifted the timing of anti-parasite treatments to the fall and winter months. As a result, there have been fewer sea lice in coastal waters as juvenile pink salmon migrate to sea in the spring. Researchers estimate that by 2009 the mortality from sea lice for juvenile pink salmon moving out to sea through the Broughton Archipelago fell to less than four per cent. This mortality estimate applies to the salmon that survive natural mortality such as predation. During the early 2000's sea lice associated with the Broughton salmon farms had a devastating effect, killing an estimated 90 per cent of the migrating wild juvenile salmon that were left after natural mortality had taken its toll.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-uncover-good-news-bc-salmon.html#jCp
There has long been concern that concentrations of sea lice in BC's fish farming pens spread to wild fish stock in surrounding waters. The researchers discovered that by changing the timing of sea lice treatments, one salmon farming region not only improved the health of their farm Atlantic salmon - the action has helped the struggling population of wild pink salmon to begin recovering. The research was focused on salmon farming operations in one specific area of the BC coast, the Broughton Archipelago, which lies between the mainland and the northern tip of Vancouver Island. The researchers describe the area as the historic ground zero for studying the impacts of aquaculture on wild Pacific salmon. Over the past decade, salmon farmers in the area have gradually shifted the timing of anti-parasite treatments to the fall and winter months. As a result, there have been fewer sea lice in coastal waters as juvenile pink salmon migrate to sea in the spring. Researchers estimate that by 2009 the mortality from sea lice for juvenile pink salmon moving out to sea through the Broughton Archipelago fell to less than four per cent. This mortality estimate applies to the salmon that survive natural mortality such as predation. During the early 2000's sea lice associated with the Broughton salmon farms had a devastating effect, killing an estimated 90 per cent of the migrating wild juvenile salmon that were left after natural mortality had taken its toll.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-uncover-good-news-bc-salmon.html#jCp
There has long been concern that concentrations of sea lice in BC's fish farming pens spread to wild fish stock in surrounding waters. The researchers discovered that by changing the timing of sea lice treatments, one salmon farming region not only improved the health of their farm Atlantic salmon - the action has helped the struggling population of wild pink salmon to begin recovering. The research was focused on salmon farming operations in one specific area of the BC coast, the Broughton Archipelago, which lies between the mainland and the northern tip of Vancouver Island. The researchers describe the area as the historic ground zero for studying the impacts of aquaculture on wild Pacific salmon. Over the past decade, salmon farmers in the area have gradually shifted the timing of anti-parasite treatments to the fall and winter months. As a result, there have been fewer sea lice in coastal waters as juvenile pink salmon migrate to sea in the spring. Researchers estimate that by 2009 the mortality from sea lice for juvenile pink salmon moving out to sea through the Broughton Archipelago fell to less than four per cent. This mortality estimate applies to the salmon that survive natural mortality such as predation. During the early 2000's sea lice associated with the Broughton salmon farms had a devastating effect, killing an estimated 90 per cent of the migrating wild juvenile salmon that were left after natural mortality had taken its toll.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-uncover-good-news-bc-salmon.html#jCp
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Kelp
Kelp (Photo credit: Wikipedia)