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Thursday, February 23, 2017

Ferraz Machinery and Engineering Ltda company profile



Based in the city of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo state, Brazil, on the Via Ananhguera, one of the main highways of the country, Ferraz now occupies premises of approximately 13,000 m2, built on a land area of 32,000 m2.

All the products that the company sells are manufactured entirely on the premises of Ferraz by the most qualified professionals in the areas of machining, boilers, bodyshop, welding, lasers, shipping, services and spares.


Ferraz projects are in accordance with the standards of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) required by the Ministry of Agriculture, and bear the ANFAL quality seal PIQ-PET (National Association of Balanced Food Manufacturers).


According to their website, "We design and install complete lines for animal feed production processes - for branny, pelleting and extruded feeds. From start to finish of every factory installation project, we present and follow all the steps of its construction. We also provide aftercare, always bringing innovations and improvements to equipment as well as effective and constant technical assistance."

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/02/2017: Aquaculture without Frontiers, the appointed solicitor trustee

by Simon Birks

As a 16 year old student reading law at “A” Level, I was sure that Law was the vocation from which I would gain the most satisfaction and pleasure

I did not however appreciate just how much this vocation would afford the chance to meet so many kind, generous and benevolent individuals.

 
Simon Birks
Turn the clocks forward by more years than I care to mention and now I find myself and our law practice working with many business owners who, as well as their day to day business operations, wish to use their positions, success and contacts to create long-term legacies that have as their foundation, the purpose of making lives better for those less fortunate than themselves.

Prior to accepting this role I have been fortunate enough to be offered the opportunity to join a trustee board on more than one occasion, particularly in relation to charities that I have assisted in the formation of.

On each occasion, I have been incredibly humbled by the invites and simply overwhelmed by the dedication of those who would be my fellow trustees. However I declined each of these as I felt that I could add little to the board other than my legal and regulatory experience.

Accepting the Role
So why now accept the role of ‘Solicitor Trustee for Aquaculture without Frontiers Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO)’?

The answer is embedded in two of my fellow trustees; Roger Gilbert and Tuti Tan.

It was their passion to use Aquaculture and the amazing opportunities it brings, to change the lives of those in developing and transition countries.

With the position and AwF, I feel there is scope to make a real difference, and I am convinced that whether great or small, AwF will undoubtedly result in saving lives.

Objectives of AwF Roger and Tuti explained the history of AwF, the former charity that existed in the UK prior to its handover to AwF USA and how they would dearly like to resume the work of AwF in the UK.

That was the start of project-renaissance that would ultimately lead to AwF UK (CIO) being ‘reformed’ in February 2016. As part of that process, the Trustees were required to state what the ‘Objects’ of the CIO would be.

We decided that this should not be overly complex and therefore we agreed that the object should be “To Promote Sustainable Aquaculture Development for the benefit of the public by the relief of poverty and the improvement of the conditions of life in developing and Transition Countries”.

We also took the opportunity to clarify that Sustainable Aquaculture Development is the “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” and Aquaculture, under the CIO objects is “the farming or aquatic organisms including fish, molluscs, crustaceans and aquatic plants”.

Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/02/2017: GAA supports responsible pangasius producers

The pangasius industry finds itself in the media spotlight, and the Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) wishes to take the opportunity to set the record straight on a number of issues

Pangasius can be produced responsibly and to rigorous food-safety standards and therefore can be purchased with confidence on these grounds.

Pangasius producers certified to Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) standards are subject to rigorous food-safety inspection and environmental production controls.

 
Image: Raita Futo
These producers have invested in their businesses to meet these requirements and should be respected for their leadership in doing so.

There have been anti-pangasius campaigns, often promoted by competing seafood interests and spread on social media, that can easily misrepresent the realities.

However, the claims made in these campaigns have been successfully challenged by scientific studies and published science literature, including Murk et al. (2016), Huysvedt et al. (2013), Little et al. (2012) and Anh et al. (2010).

The co-author of one of these papers, Simon Bush, professor of environmental policy at Wageningen University, responded to recent developments by saying, “Pangasius has been the subject of food scares and environmental scares, but on closer inspection the claims lack substance. Our analysis shows that the vigorous claims made about pangasius do not match the very limited safety risk and limited environmental impact observed in scientific studies. In reality, pangasius, a relatively new product in Western markets, has found an important niche in retail and foodservice outlets and is perhaps a victim of its own success.”

Another scientist, who has studied the life cycle impacts of pangasius, has also leapt to the fish’s defense.

Ghent University Professor Emeritus Patrick Sorgeloos said that pangasius is healthy. He told VTM news, “In the media, the fish has wrongly been given a bad image. Research of Dutch scientists has showed that the contribution of the pangasius industry to pollution in the Mekong River is negligible.”

Professor Sorgeloos also went on to challenge the notion that pangasius undermines the market for seafood.

“When pangasius made its entrance in Europe, the local fishing industry was afraid of cheap farmed fish from Asia, as they thought that consumers would buy less fish from local sources,” he said.

“This proved to be wrong. Pangasius is an ideal fish to start with and is very popular among families with children: It is odorless (no smell in the kitchen upon preparation), has no distinct fishy taste and few bones. The fish lowers the threshold for fish consumption, and at a later age the same children will be interested to expand their range of fish.”

Responding to claims of negative environmental impacts, GAA’s BAP Coordinator Dan Lee said, “Any fish species, whether in a natural or a farm setting, will interact with its environment. Pangasius is no exception and the interactions arising from production systems in Southeast Asia do have the potential to generate localised negative impacts. For this very reason, organisations such as the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) and BAP have established production and environmental standards for farmed fish to recognise those producers who mitigate against those potential negative impacts. The standards specify the controls that need to be applied to contain the risks of biodiversity impacts, wildlife interactions, pollution and the indirect impacts associated with providing marine ingredients for feeds.”

Additionally, the standards developed by GAA and ASC set controls on the use of chemicals and antibiotics to prevent any risks to the health of either the environment or the consumer.

The standards have been developed following extensive stakeholder and public consultation including retailers and conservation NGOs.

To verify compliance with BAP and ASC standards, independent certification bodies conduct annual inspections, with teams of trained auditors that have specialist knowledge of aquaculture and its potential impacts.

Given the combined forces of science-based standards and rigorous, independent auditing, it is clear that certified pangasius is a responsible sourcing choice.

As an industry, our focus can move on from questioning the environmental credentials of this product and instead be concentrating on how collaboratively we can engage to ensure the correct message is received and accepted by consumers.

GAA featured such a message at the last GOAL conference in Guangzhou, China, with a video produced by Wageningen University.

To view the Pangasius video, click HERE


For references and to read the original press release, click HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/02/2017: SONGA now capable of offering four-star BAP shrimp

Congratulations to Ecuador’s SONGA (Sociedad Nacional de Galapagos C.A.), which is now eligible to offer four-star Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) shrimp, only the second company in Ecuador capable of doing so, the Global Aquaculture Alliance announced in late February

Four star is the highest designation in the BAP third-party certification program, signifying that a product originates from a BAP-certified feed mill, hatchery, farm and processing plant.

 
Image: Cooking etc.
SONGA’s shrimp processing plant, two of its farms (Lebama Farm and Naturisa Farm) and its hatchery (Macrobio Hatchery) recently attained BAP certification.

The company sources its feed from GISIS and IMPROSA feed mills in Ecuador, both of which are BAP-certified.

SONGA is one of the top four white shrimp producers in Ecuador. In 2015 and 2016, SONGA was the number one Ecuadorian exporter to mainland China, South Korea and the United States.

The company is well known and reliable in the global markets due to its prime quality, consistency and fair weights.

“The efforts of SONGA to differentiate itself by achieving the maximum level of third-party certification truly represent its responsible aquaculture practices. SONGA is one of the leading companies in a leading country committed to environmental and social responsibility. We appreciate very much SONGA´s support,” said Marcos Moya, manager of BAP Supply Development.

BAP is the world’s most comprehensive third-party certification program, with standards encompassing environmental responsibility, social responsibility, food safety, animal health and welfare and traceability.

Currently, there are 29 BAP-certified processing plants, farms, hatcheries and feed mills in Ecuador. Worldwide, there are more than 1,600 BAP-certified facilities.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Andritz company profile


ANDRITZ is a globally leading supplier of plants, equipment, and services for hydropower stations, the pulp and paper industry, the metalworking and steel industries, and for solid/liquid separation in the municipal and industrial sectors.

The publicly listed technology Group is headquartered in Graz, Austria, and has a staff of almost 25,000 employees. ANDRITZ operates over 250 sites worldwide.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

23/02/2017: Diana Aqua marks a new milestone in its sustainable development program

Diana Aqua was recently awarded the IFFO Global Standard for Responsible Supply, Chain of Custody (IFFO RS CoC) certification

This award fully supports Diana Aqua’s ambitions to become a leader for sustainable functional marine ingredients for the aquafeed and aquaculture sector.
 

www.aquativ-diana.com

A new milestone in Diana Aqua sustainable development based on a solid and long term partnership with TC UNION AGROTECH (IFFO RS)
Since 2010, Diana Aqua and TC Union Agrotech, a Thaï leader in producing and supply aqua-industrial by products, have joined forces in a long standing partnership with the common mission to valorise co-products into performing solutions.

Thanks to unique know-how and scientific expertise, Diana Aqua has developed a leading position to deliver traceable, responsibly sourced and standardised marine ingredients with high functional value to aqua feed and aquaculture industry players.

On January 10th 2017, Diana Aqua Thai subsidiary (SPF Diana Thailand), was awarded of the IFFO Global Standard for Responsible Supply, Chain of Custody (IFFO RS CoC) certification.

This certification recognises the full commitment of Diana Aqua of providing its partners and customers with responsibly sourced raw materials, pure and safe marine ingredients with full traceability back to their source.

It also reinforces it’s positioning as sustainable reference partner in functional marine ingredients for the aqua feed and aquaculture sector based on responsibly managed factories and supply-chains.

According to Paul Seguin, Asia Sales Director, “This certification marks our global and local commitment towards delivering trust to our customers and supporting their brands on the aqua feed markets. The pressure on natural marine resources has become an imperative for all players of the value chain. Our role is to find disruptive sustainable business models to keep on serving the growing industry of aquaculture without compromising the quality and the nutritional and healthy benefits of our products”. 


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

23/02/2017: Federal government declares fishery disaster for low Pink Salmon harvest in gulf of Alaska

Governor Bill Walker and Lt. Governor Byron Mallott welcomed news that the US Department of Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker accepted the state’s request for a disaster declaration on pink salmon harvests in the Gulf of Alaska last week

In accordance with Section 312 (a) of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Management and Conservation Act (MSA), the State of Alaska requested the federal government declare a fishery disaster for poor pink salmon runs across the Gulf region in 2016.

 
Image: USDA Forest Service Alaska Service
“The impacts of low pink salmon runs are being felt across the entire Gulf of Alaska,” said Governor Bill Walker.

“In addition to commercial fishermen and fish processors, those who sell fuel, tackle, supplies, groceries, and lodging are also struggling from the poor season. Local governments will also feel the burden on their economic base. We are pleased with this news from the US Department of Commerce, and we will work with the federal government going forward to address this issue. I thank all the legislators who tirelessly advocated for this declaration, especially Representative Louise Stutes for making the first request.”

Low pink salmon runs across the Gulf of Alaska led to a significant drop in 2016 harvest numbers. This declaration provides Congress with a basis to appropriate disaster relief funding for economic assistance to affected communities.

Should Congress appropriate relief funds, the State of Alaska would be required to match 25 percent of the amount authorised.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

23/02/2017: World’s future food security “in jeopardy” due to multiple challenges, report warns

Without additional efforts, the target of ending hunger by 2030 will not be met 22 February 2017, Rome - Mankind's future ability to feed itself is in jeopardy due to intensifying pressures on natural resources, mounting inequality, and the fallout from a changing climate, warns a new FAO report out today

Though very real and significant progress in reducing global hunger has been achieved over the past 30 years, "expanding food production and economic growth have often come at a heavy cost to the natural environment," says The Future of Food and Agriculture: Trends and Challenges.

"Almost one half of the forests that once covered the Earth are now gone. Groundwater sources are being depleted rapidly. Biodiversity has been deeply eroded," it notes.
 
 As a result, "planetary boundaries may well be surpassed, if current trends continue," cautions FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva in his introduction to the report.

By 2050 humanity's ranks will likely have grown to nearly 10 billion people.

In a scenario with moderate economic growth, this population increase will push up global demand for agricultural products by 50 percent over present levels projects The Future of Food and Agriculture, intensifying pressures on already-strained natural resources.

At the same time, greater numbers of people will be eating fewer cereals and larger amounts of meat, fruits, vegetables and processed food — a result of an ongoing global dietary transition that will further add to those pressures, driving more deforestation, land degradation, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Alongside these trends, the planet's changing climate will throw up additional hurdles. "Climate change will affect every aspect of food production," the report says. These include greater variability of precipitation and increases in the frequency of droughts and floods.

To reach zero hunger, we need to step up our efforts
The core question raised by today's FAO publication is whether, looking ahead, the world's agriculture and food systems are capable of sustainably meeting the needs of a burgeoning global population.

The short answer? Yes, the planet's food systems are capable of producing enough food to do so, and in a sustainable way, but unlocking that potential — and ensuring that all of humanity benefits — will require "major transformations."

Without a push to invest in and retool food systems, far too many people will still be hungry in 2030 — the year by which the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) agenda has targeted the eradication of chronic food insecurity and malnutrition, the report warns.

"Without additional efforts to promote pro-poor development, reduce inequalities and protect vulnerable people, more than 600 million people would still be undernourished in 2030," it says. In fact, the current rate of progress would not even be enough to eradicate hunger by 2050.

Where will our food come from? 

Given the limited scope for expanding agriculture's use of more land and water resources, the production increases needed to meet rising food demand will have to come mainly from improvements in productivity and resource-use efficiency.

However there are worrying signs that yield growth is levelling off for major crops. Since the 1990s, average increases in the yields of maize, rice, and wheat at the global level generally run just over 1 percent per annum, the report notes.

To tackle these and the other challenges outlined in the report, "business-as-usual" is not an option, The Future of Food and Agriculture argues. "Major transformations in agricultural systems, rural economies and natural resource management will be needed if we are to meet the multiple challenges before us and realise the full potential of food and agriculture to ensure a secure and healthy future for all people and the entire planet," it says.

"High-input, resource-intensive farming systems, which have caused massive deforestation, water scarcities, soil depletion and high levels of greenhouse gas emissions, cannot deliver sustainable food and agricultural production," adds the report.

More with less 
The core challenge is to produce more with less, while preserving and enhancing the livelihoods of small-scale and family farmers, and ensuring access to food by the most vulnerable.

For this, a twin-track approach is needed which combines investment in social protection, to immediately tackle undernourishment, and pro-poor investments in productive activities — especially agriculture and in rural economies — to sustainably increase income-earning opportunities of the poor.

The world will need to shift to more sustainable food systems which make more efficient use of land, water and other inputs and sharply reduce their use of fossil fuels, leading to a drastic cut of agricultural green-house gas emissions, greater conservation of biodiversity, and a reduction of waste.

This will necessitate more investment in agriculture and agrifood systems, as well as greater spending on research and development, the report says, to promote innovation, support sustainable production increases, and find better ways to cope with issues like water scarcity and climate change.

Along with boosting production and resilience, equally critical will be creating food supply chains that better connect farmers in low- and middle-income countries to urban markets — along with measures which ensure access for consumers to nutritious and safe food at affordable prices, such as such as pricing policies and social protection programs, it says.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

IDAH company profile



IDAH’s ultimate goal is to be world’s number one with customer satisfaction.
IDAH’s vision is to build on our solid traditional manufacturing roots and expand out to be a full-service solutions provider: offering value-added system designs and turnkey project consultation services.

Through this expansion, we hope to create an international platform where technology could be shared and integrated for the benefit of our customers.

By upholding the IDAH Spirit, the passionate team members of IDAH are committed to achieve this vision.

The IDAH Spirit
"Creativity, Honesty & Quality "

Creativity is what gave birth to IDAH in 1974 and consequently the birth of the feeds manufacturing industry in Asia.

Innovation through creativity is what has enabled us to be the industry driver from our inception until now. IDAH is committed and well positioned to lead the industry of tomorrow.

If creativity is the engine that has rapidly pushed IDAH forward; Honesty is what keeps us moving in the right direction.

 IDAH has been firmly grounded on the virtues of quality, honour, and accountability. Our main business is to safeguard the trust that customers have given us and be a dedicated upholder of the highest quality standard.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

22/02/2017: Nutritional solutions for better health and sustainable aquaculture production

Dr Alexandros Samartzis is the Senior Technical Service Manager for Evonik (SEA) Pte. Ltd. based in Singapore

The global aquaculture industry has undergone several transformations during the last decades, driven not only by health, nutritional and production challenges but also by consumer perceptions and market demands

The two main drivers are the rapidly increasing population and the growing demand for seafood.

 
Alexandros Samartzis 
As aquaculture gets more intensive in order to cope with the global market demand, exposure and susceptibility to disease challenges are also increasing.

In the particular case of the shrimp industry, since Litopenaeus vannamei was introduced to Asia and gradually replaced Panaeus monodon, the global shrimp production has reached new heights.

Through the years a number of diseases such as; infection myonecrosis virus, acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease and enterocytozoon hepatopenaei have caused a devastating reduction in production in most of the countries.

Therefore, the threat of disease is a reality that the farmers have learned to live with.

The global trend to restrict or ban the use of antibiotics in animal production, as well as the demand for more sustainable food production, has created the need for new management solutions and strategies to fight against the pathogens that the fish and shrimp are suffering from.

In this context natural growth promoters and health solutions started gaining more interest and a place in the feed formulations.


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

22/02/2017: Heliae Development, LLC and Syndel Laboratories, LTD. announce distribution partnership of Nymega™ DHA aquaculture feed ingredient

The merger of Heliae’s algae production expertise with Syndel’s product development and marketing experience brings new, affordable source of DHA to aquaculture feed formulators

Heliae and Syndel today announced the signing of an exclusive distribution agreement to supply the aquaculture market with Nymega™, a new DHA precision formulation ingredient for feed formulators.

The partnership between Heliae and Syndel creates new opportunities to bring algae products to aquaculture feed formulation. For over 30 years, Syndel has developed and globally marketed high quality aquaculture chemical and pharmaceutical products.

 
Image: Norsk Havbrukssenter
Syndel’s established distribution channels allow Heliae, a leader in algae production technology, to expand its ability to unlock the potential of algae within the aquaculture feed market.

Aquaculture is the rearing and cultivation of aquatic animals and plants for food under controlled conditions.

As the global demand for fish increases, the aquaculture industry on the rise. The global aquaculture market is valued at over $160B and according to market research is expected to grow steadily at an estimated CAGR between 3-5% through 2020.

However, this is an industry facing multiple challenges. As sustainability pressure on fisheries increases and feed formulators search for replacement sources of long chain, highly unsaturated fatty acids (LC-HUFAs) to feed farmed fish, new, reliable and affordable sources of omega-3 fatty acids are required.

DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) is an omega-3 fatty acid key to both fish and human health. The prime source of DHA in the human diet is from consumption of DHA-rich fish such as salmon. However due to the replacement of fishmeal and fish oil with plant-based materials low in DHA in formulated feeds, the content of DHA in farmed salmon has been in decline.

“Nymega is a DHA-rich algae that provides a precision tool for targeting DHA levels in feed” said Len Smith, Chief Business Officer at Heliae.

“Nymega’s simple profile allows formulators to target specific DHA content, providing key benefits across fish species and at multiple growth stages – at a price that is finally affordable.”

Len continues, “Heliae is proud to partner with Syndel on this product launch. This agreement allows Heliae to focus on what we do best: producing algae at low cost. Syndel’s experience and expertise in product development and marketing will allow this new ingredient reach consumers quickly and efficiently.”

"Aquaculture is a critical source of protein and nutrition to meet the world’s food needs. Aquaculture's importance will continue to rise as the world population grows. With this continued growth and expansion of aquaculture, the need for high performing and nutritious feeds will be imperative to the industry and their ability to deliver to the consumer a high quality DHA rich finished product,” shares Chris McReynolds, CEO of Syndel.

“Heliae has developed an outstanding sustainable product in Nymega. Syndel is excited to partner with Heliae on the global market development and sales of this highly effective feed component.”

Heliae and Syndel are showcasing Nymega this week at the Aquaculture America Conference and Exhibition in San Antonio, Texas. Pending regulatory approval, Nymega will be available early this year.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

22/02/2017: AB Agri launches new Asia business

AB Agri, the agricultural division of international food and ingredients retail group Associated British Foods, is launching a new business specifically focused on servicing the Asia market

ISN, which will bring together the technical capabilities and specialist nutrition expertise from across the division, will offer Asian feed manufacturers and livestock and aquatic producers practical and effective feed solutions precisely tailored to the challenges these customers face.
  
 Fifteen colleagues, covering pig, poultry and aquaculture will be present at the VIV Asia stand as the ISN business is launched.

Speaking about the launch, Alistair Cross, Managing Director, said “We are delighted to officially recognise our presence in Asia in this way and bring together global innovation and expertise to help improve our customers’ businesses.

By working closely with our customers, we are certain that we will maximise agricultural output and worldwide food production.”

Neil Geddes, Head of Asia, added, “ISN is unique in the way that it works; its complete independence and integrity ensures that only the best solution is presented to the customer, whether that is from the ISN portfolio or other global resources. The expertise within our international team and the knowledge and experience of our Asian-based nutritionists will come together, enabling our customers to adapt and drive progress.”

ISN will be officially launched at the beginning of the VIV Asia show on Stand 1014, Hall 102.

In addition, Dr Ingrid Lupatsch, ISN’s aquatic specialist will be speaking at the Aquatic Conference 2017, Novotel Hotel, on Tuesday 14th March and Dr Hagen Schulze, Head of Innovation, Alternative Proteins, will be speaking at the Antibiotic Reduction seminar taking place at VIV Asia on Wednesday 15th March at 15.15 hours in room 222.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

The interview - Mr Clifford Spencer, Chairman of Aquaculture without Frontiers

  
Mr Clifford Spencer of the UK is the chairman of the newly-formed ‘Aquaculture without Frontiers’ charity which aims to promote sustainable aquaculture development for the benefit of the public by the relief of poverty and the improvement of the conditions of life in developing and Transition Countries

Currently Mr Spencer leads the Global Biotechnology Transfer Foundation (GBTF), which with support from global organisations, makes up a strong delivery mechanism for the Foundation’s aims. The GBTF was formed with the intervention of the United Nations and is dedicated to promoting the potential for biotechnology to support sustainable, long-term, socio-economic development. 

_______________________________________________________________________________

Why is aquaculture so important to an individual who has grown up in land-based agriculture?
When I studied agriculture at university in the UK, which was over 45 years ago, the UK farming industry was in the vanguard of livestock and crop production globally. My own tutors for example were the inventors of the barley beef system of red meat production and it was a time of quantum leaps in understanding of ruminant and single stomached animal farm production as well as the intensification of arable agronomy. I personally spent much time studying the area of linear programming of animal feed rations which was then the latest industry development and which ensured least cost balanced feed rations for pigs, poultry, sheep and cattle. Of particular importance was the feed conversion ratio of animal production, which is the relative efficiency with which the animals diet is converted into meat or milk production. This efficiency was lowest for intensively fed ruminants (which were in any case animals designed in nature to thrive on good quality grazing pasture) and highest in poultry with sheep and pigs falling between in performance. However at that time I knew absolutely nothing of fish production and in particular both the supreme efficiency of fish to convert feed to meat and I also knew even less of the incredibly high quality of fish protein particularly in oily fish in terms of omega oil quality vital to human health. This was because although aquaculture is a form of farming, it was kept separate (and still is in the UK) from mainstream land based farming. If I had known about aquaculture I think I might have fattened a few less beef cattle and had a look at fish much earlier in my farming career. The reason – well cattle have a conversion ratio of nearly 8:1 (that is 8 kgs of quality feed ration produces 1 kg of quality meat) whereas fish are nearer 1:1 and super-efficient converters of feed. When you come to considering bi-valves they are filter feeders and therefore scavenge the surrounding water for sustenance and at the same time clean up the environment – so what’s not to like?!

What challenges lie ahead in terms of our ever-growing population?
Well, consider that over 800 million people globally do not have adequate access to safe and nutritious food. Also the world faces a potentially even greater crisis in food security as expected global population growth to over 9 billion is coupled with increasing affluence and urbanisation. Indeed demand for food is forecast to grow by 40 percent to 2030 and 70 percent to 2050. So the farming community has the challenge to meet this demand in ways that are environmentally, socially and economically sustainable, and in the face of global climate change. Aquaculture fits this challenge of providing the world’s population with a sustainable, secure supply of good quality food from less land and with lower inputs. Also, I feel safe in the knowledge that the human race has evolved from collecting wild fruits, nuts, berries, vegetables and grains and hunting wild animals for food to successfully farming all of these things. So promoting aquaculture, the most efficient animal production known to mankind, for the benefit of future generations and those most in need has proven the next logical step.

What are the aims and objectives of the National Aquaculture Centre (NAC) in the UK and how will that benefit both domestic and foreign aquaculture?
By 2035 the UK population is forecast to be 71 million (people aged 75 and over will grow from 7.9 percent in 2012 to 13 percent in 2037). Increased aquaculture production can contribute to securing future supply, supporting local economies and delivering a carbon-efficient outcome as for instance aquaculture finfish production is “the most efficient animal production by quantity of feed to produced food”. The NAC will focus on the study and promotion of the “entire value chain of fish and shellfish farming from breeding and physical production techniques to transport and marketing,” The fish and shell fish value chain is subdivided into five principle categories being, Biology and genetics, Nutrition and husbandry, Production systems, Processing and Food product design and preparation. This will all be examined in terms of integration within the value chain, but we will also identify opportunities for developing research and educational programmes. We want to create the ‘keystone’ to all aquaculture activities in England/UK and enable organisations to engage through sharing knowledge, information, technology and operational know-how through demonstration. Also we want to study water & energy connected through science and industry and with creative and innovative research in food with all of this effort linked to the Seafood, Processing & Education Cluster in the Humber region and beyond. We also want to create a working development farm where the learning opportunities and other activities will be vast –domestically and internationally. Indeed perhaps the greatest scientific question today is the question of how to practice aquacultural research and innovation in ways that lead to development impact. By creating an efficient sustainable working farm facility which would produce and harvest fish for commercial sale we also secure:

• An aquaculture learning centre where skills and education will be shared through linkages to education partners – the main teaching areas are aquaculture, nutrition (human and animal), engineering, basic business, marketing and entrepreneurial skills relating to sustainable food production

• an aquaculture technology and innovation ‘science park’ which would encourage aquaculture and marine biotechnology research organisations to engage and connect to Humber region and beyond

• a strong conduit to the processing community in the Humber Cluster assisting in the improvement of product development, the value chain and logistics that help producers maximise their prospects

• a link to engage people from overseas in gaining working experience, knowledge and skills with the aim that we duplicate such a Centre in as many developing countries as possible.

International Aquafeed February 2017 now available





More International Aquafeed editions

Monday, February 20, 2017

Extru-Tech Inc company profile


Founded in 1985, Extru-Tech® has installed numerous extrusion systems worldwide designed for the production of human food, pet food, aquatic feed and animal feed products.

Extru-Tech® also maintains the reputation of supplying the extrusion industry with superior quality replacement parts.


Extru-Tech® currently produces and markets one of the industry's most complete lines of extrusion processing systems. 

In addition, they offer a full line of ancillary equipment and customised equipment solutions for specialised processes.

Visit the website HERE






The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

21/02/2017: New challenges and opportunities

by Ioannis Zabetakis

In Aquafarming industry, as in every other, some of the burning questions we face every day are around cost analysis, supply management and branding
 
Ioannis Zabetakis

However some of the rather hidden opportunities could be around the nutritional value of products and how these products can be better branded and marketed in a challenging environment where borders are virtually non-existent.

One of the issues that I remind my students often about is the use of hurdle technology in order to maximise shelf-file and therefore increase the size of the potential markets where we can sell our products.

Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) is an excellent tool to prolong shelf life. MAP can give fish fillets an expiry date about 7-9 days from day of production. Therefore, the product can practically travel around the globe!

What’s next?
With this in mind, let’s have a look at some of the new challenges that lie ahead.

Challenge one: Marine Pathogens
The aquaculture industry is constantly expanding to meet the needs of the global population and ever growing demand for quality protein. Economic sustainability of this industry requires an increasing diversification of cultured fish species.

A prerequisite of the introduction of new species to aquaculture is the development of larval cultures and assessing their growth and health on exposure to water from the open sea.

The semi-intensive “mesocosm” technique can be used to determine the specific biological, ecological and nutritional needs of each species, as rearing methodologies used in other established species may not be applicable.

Under the technique, unfiltered seawater is supplied to tanks in order to enhance natural planktonic productivity, providing live feed prey to the fish larvae in addition to supplements of cultured live feeds such as rotifers or Artemia.


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

21/02/2017: Enterra receives CFIA approval to sell insect larvae to aquaculture industry

Enterra Feed Corporation has received approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to sell its Whole Dried Black Soldier Fly Larvae as a feed ingredient for salmonids, including farmed salmon, trout and arctic char

With this approval, the Metro Vancouver-based company is now the first to market and sell this sustainable, natural product to aquaculture feed manufacturers in Canada.

 
Image: Liz Lawley
This is the first Canadian approval of an insect-based aquaculture feed ingredient, and follows the CFIA's approval using this same product in feed for chicken broilers last year.

Enterra received a similar US approval for use in salmonid feeds in 2016.

Canada is the fourth-largest producer of farmed salmon in the world, according to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

In 2015 the farm gate value, the net value when it leaves the farm,  of salmon and trout in Canada was $850 million.

"Aquaculture feed producers have been keenly awaiting this approval and we look forward to supplying their needs immediately," said Andrew Vickerson, Chief Technology Officer, Enterra.

"Fish eat insects in their natural environment and our product is a healthy, digestible and renewable source of protein and fat that can replace less sustainable ingredients, including fish meal and soybean meal."

Production of fish meal, which is a standard aquaculture feed ingredient, can deplete wild ocean fish stocks and is subject to substantial price fluctuations.

Soybean meal requires significant agricultural inputs that could otherwise be used more efficiently to grow food for people.

"Insects are a natural source of digestible protein and fat for fish, including salmon and trout," said Dr Brad Hicks, a veterinarian and partner in Taplow Feeds, an aquaculture feed manufacturer.

"This product will contribute to healthy, active fish and is a great alternative feed ingredient."

Enterra's insect-based feed ingredients are sustainably produced with a long-term price guarantee.

The company collects pre-consumer recycled food from farms, grocery stores and food producers -- waste that would otherwise be sent to landfill, compost or waste-to-energy facilities where the nutrient value would be lost or underutilised.

Instead, Enterra feeds the waste food to black soldier fly larvae which grow rapidly under controlled conditions.

Once mature, the larvae are processed into renewable feed ingredients in the form of Whole Dried Black Soldier Fly Larvae, Enterra Meal (made of de-fatted larvae) and Enterra Oil (extracted from the larvae).

Enterra's sales have tripled each year since its Langley farm opened in 2014. Through its proprietary process, Enterra has converted tens of thousands of metric tonnes of pre-consumer waste food into sustainable feed ingredients for its growing customer base.

The company plans to expand its existing facility and establish additional farms in Canada and the US to meet the increased customer demand anticipated to result from future US and Canadian approvals of a complementary feed product, Enterra Meal. These approvals are expected in 2017.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Jefo company profile




Jefo is a world leader in the field of non-medicated performance feed additives for the poultry, swine, ruminant and aquaculture sectors. Founded in Canada in 1982, today Jefo has offices on 5 continents, and specialises in the design, manufacturing, warehousing and JIT-distribution of an array of animal nutrition specialty products.

Jefo is a pioneer in the green revolution taking place in animal nutrition.

According to their website: "Our commitment is to providing effective alternatives for optimal performances in animal nutrition".

The Europe / Africa division of Jefo was created in 1998 and is headquartered in Nantes, France. We market a line of original products including vitamins, enzymes, organic acids and essential oils.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

20/02/2017: A seafood treat at the mouth of Love River - Taiwan’s Seafood and Fisheries Show

The TFSS 2016 took place in Kaohsiung’s Conference and Exposition Centre in southern Taiwan on November 9-11, 2016

Over 212 companies were on the exhibition floor and represented among the 401 booths in this most modern of exhibition buildings right at the centre of this massive port city of Kaohsiung.

Kaohsiung is the second largest city in Taiwan and is noted for its tall high-rise buildings, particularly the 248m-tall Tuntex Sky Tower as well as its diversity of parks.
 


The Exhibition hall makes a significant impact on the city’s skyline in the port area where the Love River meets the sea and the island of Qijin acts as a natural breakwater.

This Taiwan International Fisheries and Seafood Show, to give it its full name, offers that unique experience of being commercial yet in a relaxed consumer or tourist environment: providing the latest in technology yet offering a low-key retail-like experience; providing information on every type of fish species bred or caught for food production while sampling different foods from these two industries cooked and served on the spot.

To break up this over-indulgence in the taste, there was a complete fanfare of fishing equipment to discover- from fish production and harvesting, through to processing and retail - there were specialised breakout conferences.

It was into this expo environment that International Aquafeed entered Kaohsiung for the second time in little over a year.

The theme of the show was ‘Green Fishery and Resource Sustainability,’ which aimed at building awareness of sustainability for an industry that is quickly exploring potential solutions to the challenges that hold back fish production - from both the capture and fish farming industries – and to meet growing consumer demand for traceable, high-quality and safe fish products.

“I feel the show is happening and everyone is speaking about our critical success,” says Irene Liu the general manager of MyExhibition one of the joint partners with Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA).

“The global demand for fish is growing and we see the proof of this at our show. This is only our second time but the achievement in the number of exhibitors is higher than expected and even on the second day we have reached our overall target for visitors,” she says.

“We actually targeted 6500 professional buyers, not just local but from overseas as well. By the second day we had achieved that number. For the exhibitors we have achieved a greater number of national governments exhibiting – 16 in total. And this year we welcomed visitors from 56 countries,” she adds.

With 401 exhibitors, the show had achieved a 10 percent increase over 2015.

“Given the undercurrent of the economy, this is a great achievement not just for us as the exhibition company but one which we have built for our customers.”

“Amazingly, the number of international exhibitors exceeded 100 and doubled last year’s total of 56. They have come from 21 countries,” says Ms Liu.

The top nine visiting countries were Japan, Vietnam, China, Thailand, Hong Kong, Philippines, Singapore, United States and Indonesia.

A unique exhibition
The event offered one-to-one meetings which assisted elite buyers to meet with exhibitors and more than 122 sessions took.

The 2016 Taiwan Aquaculture Industry Trends seminar presented not only International Aquafeed addressing world aquaculture, but also research professor Dr Yang Huey-Lang of the National Cheng Kung University on ‘Sustainable grouper farming’, which identified bottlenecks in production and key new developments for overcoming them.

Look out for International Aquafeed’s March edition, which will feature an article written by Dr Yang Huey-Lang on this topic.

Also on the program was Ms Shirlene Maria Anthonysamy, acting director of INFOFISH who reviewed Trend in Seafood Markets in Asia.

All three presentations proved to be highlights of the event. It was also a privilege for me to present upon ‘The state of world aquaculture’ including the latest developments in nutrition and advances in fish farming technology.

The uniqueness of this exhibition is that it combines all aspects of seafood production, processing and retail. Not only does it cater for those interested in fishery equipment and technology but also those working in all sectors of aquaculture.

It caters for those companies adding value to seafood as well as processes, fishery services and marine biotechnology.

Importantly, in Taiwan the government is deeply involved in fishing to ensure quality regulations are in place and followed, whilst unsafe practices and harmful handling and processing is eliminated.

Local government and academia are well represented and well worth visiting, the National Taiwan Ocean University being one organisation of note.

Another company of note was Idah, the Taiwanese feed equipment manufacturer that produces extruders for fish feed production systems, plus all the ancillary equipment needed in a fish feed plant.

In fact, the company discussed its planned development of a teaching program in 2017 to meet the demand for higher quality feeds.

The Grobest Group which is a leading shrimp feed brand that commands over eight percent of the global market for shrimp feeds, showcased its quality white and grass shrimp bred with its own feeds which featured physiological regulators that allow shrimp to grow more healthily and sustain a brighter colour, symmetric body and high palatability.

Check out our feature article on this in this edition! While devoted to supplying quality shrimp, traceable from the farm to the dining table, Grobest also offers customised services ranging from product design and development to logistics management.

This approach has allowed the company to become a long-term supply partner for the top 10 retail groups and catering companies in the USA and Europe.

The Ousei Taiwan Group displayed its non-bubble gas dissolved water system. It’s dedicated to helping aquaculture farmers upgrade their farming environments and presented its newly-developed Oxygen Fighter.

This unit can supply different levels of oxygen to fit the different needs of aquatic products and provide them with an environment for sustainable growth.

The company also offers a series of advanced products to help tackle hazardous substances commonly seen in aqua farming operations.

The firm is also working towards setting up an ecological aquatic alliance to establish standardised ecological aquaculture farming systems for affiliated members and customers.


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

20/02/2017: Pentair releases new product, TAURUS™ VS PUMP

Replace your traditional pump with Pentair’s revolutionary variable speed technology and start saving now
New Taurus VS Variable Speed Pumps bring the exceptional energy cost savings of variable speed technology to aquaculture for applications that require up to a 1.5-HP pump.

 
www.pentair.com
Electrical energy costs can be reduced by moving water more efficiently at lower speeds. Less work equals more savings when compared to conventional, single-speed pumps.

Up to an 80 percent energy savings!

• Suitable for a wide range of applications; automatically recognizes and adapts to 115- or 230-volt power, 50Hz or 60 Hz

• Includes quick-connect union adaptors for 1.5" NPT plumbing

• Moves water more efficiently at lower speeds for energy savings up to 80 percent

• Simple, easy-to-use digital control keypad

• Three programmable speeds, plus override capability

• Real-time, 24-hour clock, and external control mode featuring remote activation via 5-30V AC or DC inputs

• Ultra-quiet Aquaculture-Duty totally enclosed fan-cooled (TEFC) motor; user-selectable speeds from 300 RPM to 3,450 RPM

Easy to install
The Taurus VS pump is the most electrically-versatile pump on the market; it can operate on either 115- or 230-volt power, single-phase, 50Hz or 60Hz. The easy-to-access wiring compartment makes connection fast and simple.

Easy to operate
The Taurus VS pump comes with an advanced onboard digital display and a real-time, 24-hour clock which is easy to program and monitor. Select from three programmable speed settings plus an override speed setting to meet your specific pumping needs.

It also includes external control and digital input modes; allowing all programmed speeds to be controlled remotely via 5-30V AC or DC inputs.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

20/02/2017: AquaFarm, a huge success for the first edition in Fiera di Pordenone

Aquaculture, Algae and Vertical Farming protagonists of the event with their production chain

Three sectors, strategic to the future of the national economy, have met up in the first integrated event organised in Europe.

 
www.aquafarm.show
The result? A success with no ifs, buts nor maybes.

The success of the first edition of AquaFarm is all in the numbers: 80 brands present among the exhibitors, two sponsors such as “Del Pesce” Group and Biorigin, 4 partnerships with sector associations - of which two are international -, 15 international conference sessions, 113 speakers, 12 national and international media partners, visitors from 25 countries, in numbers greater by far than expected.

With this result, the event is already an instant classic, and it has become a landmark for aquaculture, vertical farming and algae farming, in Italy and the Mediterranean basin.

Numerous Italian and international protagonists have taken part in the event:

- Honourable Giuseppe Castiglione, State undersecretary of Agriculture, Food and Forestry
- Riccardo Rigillo, the general manager of the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Forestry
- Professor Stefano Cataudella, president of the General Commission for Mediterranean Fishing/FAO
- Dickson Despommier of Columbia University, creator of the concept of vertical farm
- Vice-president of EABA, the pan-European association of the algae industry, prof. Mario Tredici
 
www.aquafarm.show

The industry-research team that created the first Italian vertical farm for EXPO 2015 and which is now developing the first operational, building-sized realisation, and also a miniature version for the domestic and commercial market.

And, of course, the representatives of the major Italian and European research and industry entities of the three sectors of the event, the dedicated departments or divisions of Friuli Venezia Giulia, Veneto, Emilia Romagna and Sicilia, the presidents of the two Italian breeder associations, Pier Antonio Salvador of API and Giuseppe Prioli of AMA, the industries and the operators.

www.aquafarm.show

“To exhibitors, to speakers, to all partners and collaborators – declares Renato Pujatti, president of Pordenone Fiere – Pordenone Fiere’s sincerest thanks for the contribution given at AquaFarm. We are already focused on the next edition, with ventures and innovations we trust will allow Aquafarm to provide an even more interesting and engaging service for the reference community. Farewell, then, to the 15th and 16th February 2018”.

The presentation of the 15 conference sessions of AquaFarm 2017, the video interviews, and the photo and video gallery will be available shortly on the website www.aquafarm.show.

Aquafarm 2018 will take place again in Pavilion 5 of Pordenone Fiere, on the 15th and 16th February.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news