Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Rising from the ashes: Camanchaca’s case

by Franco Vera

Salmones Camanchaca’s hatchery in Ensenada, close to Petrohue river in southern Chile, was badly affected in April 2015 by a sudden eruption of the Calbuco volcano, which was inactive for more than 40 years. Today, it looks as if nothing had happened, and the brand-new facility has become again an example of state-of-the-art RAS technology.

Salmones Camanchaca’s hatchery in Ensenada is located on the road that connects the towns of Ensenada and Ralun in the Los Lagos region of Chile. It is a global benchmark for recirculation technology, and the first to use this technology in early 2000´s and is among the largest in the world, producing 12 million smolts-per-annum. A visitor would never suspect that only four years ago, this land was fully covered by ashes from the bottom of the earth lifted by the neighboring volcano, Calbuco.
 


People working on the day of the eruption felt some slight tremors. Hugo Cajas, Camanchaca’s hatchery’s Head Officer, reported "initially nothing strange was felt, considering that Chile is a seismic country, however, we started to received photos from a distant town, displaying an impressive plume emerging from Volcano Calbuco. We started to realise the magnitude of the event”.

Some employees went outside the hatchery to watch the neighboring volcano, located approximately 30 kilometers away, and noticed a gigantic mass of ashes and volcanic sand from the volcano’s explosions, which started to cover the facility completely.

This ash plume was one of the largest ever recorded in Chile. Everyone followed the company’s strict safety protocols and left the plant. Hugo Cajas recalls; our foremost critical concern was people’s security and ordered an immediate evacuation".

Once the evacuation was almost completed, we made sure that the equipment’s were left “on” to procure oxygenation to the baby fishes, aiming to protect as many as possible”.

The extent of the damage became apparent over the next few days, as fish mortality reached around 50 percent. In only a few hours, 15 years of work at the plant was buried under 600 kg/m2 of ash and volcanic sand, resulting in structural damage to the entire facility, as well as broken ponds and troughs.

Titanic rescue work managed to save around seven million fish, or one half, most of which were moved to other hatcheries using 250 trucks, while over one million smolts were taken to marine farm sites in 11 boats. This was a massive logistical challenge, carried out in the middle of an unstable volcano activity.

But natural disasters don't paralyse Chileans. As soon as Camanchaca’s employees were able to return to the hatchery, the rebuilding mode was played out.

Cajas said "we never thought of leaving the plant, were forced to do so, but as soon as authorities permitted, were back to manage the disaster and initiate the reconstruction".


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Gael Force Group establish base to serve aquaculture industry across Atlantic Canada

Gael Force Group have established a base in Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland and Labrador, to serve aquaculture producers in the province and across Atlantic Canada with their high quality and robust range of marine equipment, technology and services. 

Their new Canadian company base is on Maloney Street in Grand Falls-Windsor, immediately off the Trans-Canada Highway.  From there, Gael Force will be supporting its customers with sales and technical service, product development, moorings design and assembly, pen building, cameras and feed system installations and technical support for fish farm site installations.
 
Darren Lane (Branch Supervisor, Gael Force Canada),
Stewart Graham (Managing Director of Gael Force Group),
Anthony Balmer (Technical Sales Engineer, Gael Force Canada)

Image credit: Gael Force Group

Active recruitment for the company's provincial office has taken place and during the initial phase of establishment additional staff will also be required.  Future roles will be advertised at and on their website,HERE, and on the company's social media channels. 

Gael Force are currently building feeding barges in Atlantic Canada, designing and supplying mooring systems, feed cameras and other technology equipment for new sites in Newfoundland and Labrador, and along with that aims to support the existing fish farming site infrastructure for all producers. Its aim is to be the trusted supply partner to the industry in Newfoundland and Labrador and throughout Atlantic Canada as it seeks to grow.  The supplier is already supporting new business established earlier this year in Atlantic Canada as it provides service to Mowi as it grows its operations.


Read the full article on the International Aquafeed website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Extru-Tech Inc company profile




Founded in 1985, Extru-Tech® has installed numerous extrusion systems worldwide designed for the production of human food, pet food, aquatic feed and animal feed products.


Extru-Tech® also maintains the reputation of supplying the extrusion industry with superior quality replacement parts.


Extru-Tech® currently produces and markets one of the industry's most complete lines of extrusion processing systems. 

In addition, they offer a full line of ancillary equipment and customised equipment solutions for specialised processes.

Visit the website HERE



The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Nutrition Technologies closes funding round to set up Southeast Asia’s largest insect protein production facility

Singapore based agri-food tech company Nutrition Technologies has closed a funding round from a consortium of investors to establish the largest high-tech commercial-scale insect protein production facility in Southeast Asia, which can produce over 18,000 tonnes of insect-based feed ingredients and organic fertilisers every year.
 
Black soldier fly
Image credit: Nutrition Technologies
It's no secret that the livestock, aqua and pet feed industries are facing a significant challenge in sourcing high-grade proteins, and there is growing interest in the alternative protein sector. After completing three years developing proprietary technology, in 2018 Nutrition Technologies started commercial production of protein & oil from black soldier fly larvae as a sustainable alternative to fishmeal.

The new industrial-scale facility will incorporate Nutrition Technologies' proprietary insect-rearing production system to manufacture Hi.Protein® insectmeal, its flagship product, as an economical and scalable alternative to competing fishmeal products on the market. Nutrition Technologies will also dedicate a significant portion of the funds to continue its cutting-edge black soldier fly genetics and biology research.

'The key to be successful in this sector is being able to produce a consistently high quality product at an affordable price for feed manufacturers without charging a sustainability premium', said Nick Piggott, Co-Founder and CEO of Nutrition Technologies. 'We have achieved this by developing a unique combination of bio-processing steps, which enables us to optimise the nutrient uptake in our insect larvae. Coupled with the low operating costs in Southeast Asia, and the ideal tropical rearing conditions, we're in a very strong position'.

VIsit the Nutrition Technologies website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Technology keeps catfish jumping and profits steady

by Helen Taylor, Content Manager, In-Situ Inc, USA

Andy Jones compares the catfish industry to the jagged graph of a heartbeat displayed on an EKG machine. The peaks and valleys of that pulsating line are a vivid metaphor for the fluctuating fortunes of a seasonal business dependent on live animals and a dynamic market.

Jones is in a good position to make the connection. As a second-generation catfish farmer, he’s seen first-hand the highs that come with booming demand and the lows of a devastating fish kill. His father, Austin, started Bear Creek Fisheries in Moorhead, Mississippi, USA, in 1982, and after receiving his Master’s in Agribusiness, Jones officially joined the family business he’d worked in since childhood.
 


That was more than a decade ago. Since then, Jones has continually looked for ways to protect the physical health of his stock and the economic health of his farm. And as one who’s never shied away from technology, he’s found that while manpower is important, advancements in automated pond management have put him ahead of the game.

Challenge

Bear Creek Fisheries specialises in fingerling production. Every June, Jones fills 100 ponds with young fish hatched by his brood stock. They’re fed through the summer and fall until they’re six-to-eight inches long and then sold to as many as 200 food fish producers to raise until they’re ready to harvest in about a year’s time.

Jones says they might raise 50-to-75 million fingerlings a season. At that volume some mortality is inevitable, but Jones shoots for at least a 75 percent survival rate. In a rough year, it’s been as low as 60 percent, and in his best year, 84 percent made it.

That’s impressive when you consider the many threats young catfish face – namely oxygen depletion, disease and predation from birds.

“Herons, egrets, pelicans, cormorants – the birds eat you alive,” says Jones. “But the biggest challenges are loss of electricity, which can cut out the aerators, and disease.”

During the day, the fish thrive on oxygen produced through photosynthesis. But when the sun goes down and the temperature drops, oxygen levels fall, and it’s up to electric-powered aerators to agitate the water and keep them stable. An undetected electrical outage or equipment failure can be catastrophic.

Oxygen monitoring is also critical to disease prevention. While Jones wants to feed his fingerlings as much as possible, he doesn’t want to stress them out and make them sick.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Aller Aqua company profile



Aller Aqua produce fish feed for freshwater and saltwater aquaculture. That is the brief presentation, but it doesn’t even come close to covering the entire story.

Aller Aqua is a family owned company with roots tracing back more than a thousand years. They have produced fish feed for more than 50 years, and this makes them one of the worlds most experienced fish feed producers, delivering some of the best products on the market, to their customers.

Today Aller Aqua has factories in Denmark, Poland, Germany and Egypt, they export products to more than 70 countries worldwide. They have a broad and professional product range, consisting of feed for 30 species of fish.

According to their website, “We know the importance the right feed plays in our customers production, and therefore our own professional development- and research centre in Germany, Aller Aqua Research, consistently works on optimising, developing and documenting the effect of our products. This ensures that our customers receive top-quality professional products, at competitive prices – delivered on time. As a company we are big enough to meet your needs, and small enough to be flexible”.

“This ensures that we can react quickly to our customer’s needs, which is essential when you strive not only to deliver fish feed, but also to spar with and contribute to optimising our customers businesses. Our experience and history is our guarantee to our customers that we know what we are talking about, that we keep our promises, and that we are right here – and that will still be the case in many years to come”.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Monday, July 29, 2019

The Veramaris solution: How sustainable aquaculture will spark further growth in industry

by Veramaris, the Netherlands

As the demand for salmon at the dinner table surges globally in line with population growth, so does the pressure on small forage fish used in feeding them.


According to the FAO, overfishing and illegal poaching does contribute to the depletion of the world’s oceans finite quantity amount of small feeder fish like anchovy, sardines and sprat, used in aquaculture. And farmed fish aren’t the only species that rely on those small fish for food: the entire global marine ecosystem of  coastal communities relies on it a well.
 


The demand for salmon

And it’s big business. Industry research estimates the price/earnings to growth ratio (PEG) of the global aquaculture industry at about a US $175 billion market, is expected to grow to $225 billion by 2022. Salmon aquaculture alone accounts for 70 percent of that total and is the fastest growing food production system in the world, according to a recent report by Rabobank, entitled “100 billion-dollar baby: How aquaculture keeps growing.”

However, the problem is that two-thirds of the world's fish stocks today are either fished at their limit or over-fished, according to an analysis by the Bren School of Environmental Science and Earth Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara and the Environmental Defence Fund. Each year ,16 million metric tonnes of fish are caught solely to produce fishmeal and fish oil, with 80 percent of the fish oil going directly to aquaculture feeds.

Demand is expected to continue to soar. Already today, half of the fish eaten by people comes from aquaculture: by 2030, it will top 62 percent, according to the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN. Fish production in 2016 reached a record high production level of 171 million metric tonnes for an also record per capita global consumption of 20 kilograms. The UN reports that the “fisheries sector is crucial in meeting FAO’s goal of a world without hunger and malnutrition.”


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Inteqnion Solutions company profile



Inteqnion is specialised in the design, build and installation of control systems for the batch and continuous controlled process industry. With their control solutions, Inteqnion focus on the improvement and optimisation of your production process.

Industries
You can find Inteqnion Process Control Systems in different segments within the feed, flour and bulk industry. For each segment, Inteqnion modifies the Process Control Systems for the specific requirements in the particular market.

Why choose Inteqnion?
“When you cooperate with Inteqnion you choose for quality and reliability. You benefit from our knowledge and experience our passion. Inteqnion is a no-nonsense organisation with more than 30 professionals who have years of experience in the process industry”
– Interqnion Solutions


Visit the Inteqnion website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Sunday, July 28, 2019

The large yellow croaker farming industry in China

by Li Hongpeng, Jian Linjiang and Dong Qiufen, Guangzhou Nutriera Group Co., Ltd, China

Large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) is an important marine economic carnivorous fish, belonging to Perciformes, Sciaenidae and Pseudosciaena. It mainly distributes in the East China Sea and the Southern Yellow Sea, and a few in the offshore waters on the eastern side of the Leizhou Peninsula in the South China Sea, commonly known as large yellow croaker, the big king fish.

However, large yellow croakers were so severely depleted due to the heavy captureins in the 1950s and onwards. After peaking at about 200,000 tonnes in the mid-1970s, catches of the croaker in China declined by over 90 percent within two decades. Therefore, large yellow croaker was categorised as a “threatened” fish in the IUCN Red List.
 

The extensive maricultural programme was introduced to address food supply and control overfishing in the 1980s, particularly of the croaker and was one of the earliest for marine finfish, not only as a nation with rich and highly successful history in aquaculture in China, but globally. With the vigorous development of the cultured large yellow croaker industry in recent years, the aim of this paper is to make an in-depth study on the culture situation of large yellow croaker in China.

Large yellow croaker production in China
According to 2018 statistics, the total aquaculture production of large yellow croaker in 2017 reached 177,640 tonnes. The production in Fujian, Zhejiang, and Guangdong provinces accounted for 84.75 percent, 8.21 percent, and 7.04 percent respectively, as shown in table one.

Comparing with the production in 2016, it showed a dramatic increase of 17.54 percent in 2017. Due to the overfishing and low supply, the farming production increases sharply. In recent years, the consumption for valuable fishes are increasing with the living standard improving. As table 2 shows, price of large yellow croaker kept stably high around USD $4/kg. It’s estimated that the large yellow croaker production might continually rise in 2019.

Besides local consumption in mainland China, South Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong of China are also major consumers for large yellow croaker. Some hatcheries in South Korea and Taiwan have conducted trials of large yellow croaker breeding, but none of them have succeeded. Therefore, it mainly relies on the buying from mainland China to meet the local market demand.

South Korea is the largest importer of large yellow croaker and it imports about 40,000 tonnes of large yellow croaker from China every year. In recent years, Taiwan buys about 8,000 tonnes of large yellow croaker from the Ningde area yearly, mainly with chilled products. Hong Kong buys 3,000 tonnes of chilled large yellow croaker from Ningde annually. In addition, frozen large yellow croaker is also exported to the United States and European countries in a small amount.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

TSC Silos company profile



As a specialist in the building of square silos
 TSC Silos supplies an end product that meets the highest quality requirements and is used in a variety of industries


According to TSC Silos, “We use our focus and expertise to design suitable rectangular silo installations of which we are proud. That is all we do: we design, calculate and build silos; day in day out, year in year out. For your benefit.”

The rectangular silo concept is characterised by an optimum storage capacity and flexible layout options. A clever design produces the best possible product discharge with maximum storage capacity.

With a TSC silo you are also investing in a safe, hygienic working environment.

The organisation is 100 percent focused on this silo concept, from sale and design to production and installation.

They are able to handle projects from A to Z: from the steel support structure to the insulating cladding and from functional design up to and including fitting.

At TSC safety is a given. Their well-trained engineers carry out sound calculations for your silo. TSC designs, calculates and manufactures all the silos in accordance with the latest standards (EN 1991, EN 1993 and EN 1090).

TSC Silos are familiar with ATEX, earthquake coefficients, snow loads and the effects of wind. Everything is worked out using advanced computer software down to the smallest detail.

If you so desire, you can have the calculations checked by independent parties; that’s not a problem.

Their experienced installation teams have all the necessary training and are at home on construction sites.


Visit the TSC Silos website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Thursday, July 25, 2019

Supporting gut health with seaweed extracts: A targeted approach

by Marie Gallissot and Maria Garcia Suarez, Olmix Group

Importance of gut health in modern production systems
Gut health has become increasingly important in the livestock industry with the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and the urge to limit the use of antibiotics. The intestinal mucosa converges various functions: digestion and absorption of nutrients; as well as physical barriers against microbes and toxins, thanks to the presence of a protective mucus layer and tight junction proteins that seal the paracellular space.
 


The intestinal mucosa hosts both gut microbiota and immune cells (70% of the total number of immune cells are residents of the gut mucosa and gut-associated lymphoid tissue).

In modern production systems, the gastrointestinal tract is being challenged and the subtle gut health balance being relied on can be impaired. The components that define gut barrier and immune function can be weaken and lead to higher occurrence of digestive troubles associated with dysbiosis.

This disbalance will trigger local and systemic inflammation, affecting the global health status and the growth performance of the animals. The challenge in the industry is to find solutions capable of supporting the epithelial barrier function and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), in order to maintain a proper gut health and, thus, ensure good performance without the need of antibiotics.

Seaweeds: The multi-asset solution!
Many candidates are available, with varying efficacy and scientific evidence. Among them, seaweeds, or macroalgae, which have gained great interest in the past decades and are the object of increasing research. In the literature, seaweeds are being ascribed a wide range of biological activities, such as immunomodulating, antioxidant, antiviral or antihyperlipidemic properties.

Seaweeds are divided into three groups: brown, red and green algae. Despite their phylogenetic differences, seaweeds share the specificity of their parietal polysaccharides. Their structural complexity and unique composition make them very reactive and explain their biological activities towards animals, plants and humans.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Amandus Kahl company profile



More than 130 years of experience in plant and machine manufacture have made Amandus Kahl a respected manufacturer and supplier of extruders, compound feed presses, wood pelleting plants or granulate coolers, for example.

The company’s motivation has always been to develop an even better product for their customers. For this reason they cooperate with research institutes and universities. You can always be sure that they will supply you an optimally customised wood pelleting plant, grain cooking plant, waste-tyre recycling plant etc.

Their scope of services also comprises maintenance and repair of the compacting machines, compound feed presses, extruders and wood pelleting plants as well as all other products they offer in their company.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, July 24, 2019

Fancy some Norwegian salmon? Visit this vending machine in Singapore!

According to a news article by Coconuts Singapore earlier this year, frozen Norwegian salmon is now available from a vending machine in Wisteria Mall, Singapore. 
Image credit: Naotake Murayama on Flickr
(CC BY 2.0)

A local distributor has come up with the idea to sell the fillets of omega-3 fatty acids to the Singaporean masses. A transaction exchanges 200g of raw premium salmon fillet for S$5.90. The company's founder, Manish Kumar, commented that the vending machine should be a hit due to its cashless system and 24/7 availability.

Read the original article on the Coconuts Singapore website, HERE.



The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

IFFO and GAA call for a new co-management approach for South East Asian fisheries

by IFFO, the Marine Ingredients Organisation

South East Asian seas serve as a major source of food and livelihood for hundreds of millions of people. 80 percent of the seafood produced by these waters, mainly fisheries in Vietnam and Thailand, is supplied for human consumption.

The remaining 20 percent is used to produce fishmeal and oil used in aquaculture feeds. Both these supply chains use seafood from complex, multi-species fisheries which are intrinsically more complex than those found in northern waters.
 


Traditional fisheries management techniques are challenging to apply to this region which has one of the most diverse marine ecosystems in the world and currently there is no consensus on the most appropriate ways to manage these tropical multispecies, multi-gear fisheries.

The Marine Ingredients Organisation (IFFO) co-funded a study with the Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA), focused on Thailand and Vietnam, to fill information gaps and help drive positive change. Now, IFFO calls for co-management that opens the path to a specific way of addressing the existing challenges.

South East Asian fisheries are facing numerous challenges
South East Asian fisheries are crucial in the global seafood value chain, generating several billion dollars in GDP for the region. As a result, some countries in the region have been subject to media interest in the environmental, social and ethical practices in the region.

Thailand, for instance, is the third largest seafood exporter in the world. As a consequence of the increasing demand, Thailand and Vietnam invested heavily in developing their fisheries from the 1960s through the 1980s, which significantly increased fishing effort.

Today, overfishing and destructive fishing methods threaten the existence of the South East Asian seafood system. A report released in 2018 by the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP) stated that, “Target 75* (for the sector overall) can only be achieved by expanding improvement efforts in Asian reduction fisheries. Higher-volume multispecies trawl and small pelagic fisheries must be investigated to identify the most likely candidates to contribute to improvement in this sector”.

However, with the increasing drive for certification schemes and the collective involvement of local governments, citizens, local and global NGOs, there are incentives and good prospects of finding the keys to move toward more sustainable practices.

Market pressure from processors, aquaculture producers and exporters can have a positive effect on encouraging a transition to responsible production. In April 2015, the European Union issued a ‘yellow card’ warning in response to a failure by Thailand to sufficiently tackle the problem of IUU fishing, a step also taken for Vietnam in October 2017.

More sustainable practices are already in the works
Thailand’s reforms to address illegal fishing (including the establishment of Port In-Port Out (PIPO) reporting measures, a large electronic vessel tracking system and better traceability, amongst many other initiatives) enabled the lifting of the yellow card in January 2019.

Furthermore, Fisheries Improvement Projects (FIPs) have become recognised as a stepping stone to achieving step-wise improvements in fishery management and providing responsible sourcing opportunities in the supply chain.

In November 2018, IFFO Responsible Supply (IFFO RS) launched new criteria developed specifically to assess multispecies fisheries. These criteria are to be tested as part of a three-year pilot programme.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Food waste to feed, Entobel wins the Aquaculture Innovation Challenge

Expert judges' favoured Entobel as the innovation with the most potential in the finals of the Aquaculture Innovation Challenge. Entobel uses food industry waste as feed for the production of black soldier flies, a native insect throughout Vietnam.
 
These plentiful insects are then used to produce fish-feed, as well as fertiliser. The jury said that Entobel 'has a really good business approach, has been proven to be successful in the world already and is part of the race for a sustainable protein supply'. The winning team received the $10,000 cash prize and met with investors, both of which will help them scale up their business.
 
Image credit: John Tann on Flickr
(CC BY 2.0)

The winner was chosen by the jury team, each of whom selected their 1st, 2nd and 3rd choice of innovation that they believed had the greatest business and impact potential. Gaetan Crielaard, representative of the Entobel team, said, 'I'm very happy, obviously. For four years in Vietnam, I've been working on this project… [the team] all worked very hard and will be happy when I come back to the factory and say we won. This will help us to run the pilot for a few more weeks or months, allowing me to focus more on fundraising to build this factory. The plan is quite ambitious. While we want to start with one factory, the goal is to build more, first in South Vietnam, then the North, and then other tropical countries with a focus on Southeast Asia, but [eventually] Africa and South America. We believe that what we have built here is really relevant for tropical countries.'


Read the full article on the International Aquafeed website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Yemmak company profile





Established in 1965, Yemmak is a Turkish feed machinery manufacturer, providing industrial process solutions for the animal waste processing, chemical and biomass industries.

Through its deep industry experience spanning over half a century, Yemmak exports to 35 countries on four continents, and provides services in project consulting and engineering, special-purpose projects, automation, modernisation, steel construction and after-sales support with a 250-strong staff lead specialist engineers at its 50,000m2 area plant in Bandırma, Turkey.

Yemmak is among the few producers in Turkey and Europe that can manage machinery, process and turnkey projects from a single centre.

Yemmak recognises the key role of advanced technology in improving Turkey's prospects and believes R&D investments are crucial in this regard.

As a global brand, Yemmak exports 70 percent of its products to 35 countries including Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Israel, Lebanon and the rest of the Middle East; Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and all other Turkish republics; and Russia, Ukraine, Armenia, Sweden and Panama. Providing low energy costs, the design, production, and assembly operations of the company are of high quality, selection, reliability, and efficiency.

Yemmak sees each project as a complete system, and identifies for its customers the most optimal solutions. With the mission of transforming factories into manufacturers that turn out products with high marginal utility, Yemmak has set up numerous of the highest capacity factories, producing feed for poultry, cattle and fish. It is currently establishing the largest turkey feed factory in Russia.

Yemmak's primary product groups consist of:
- Raw material intake and cleaning units
- Storage solutions for solid and liquid raw materials
- Grinders Mixer systems
- Blending units
- Pelletising technologies
- Weighing and bagging machinery
- Transport equipment
- Electrical power panels and control panels
- Automation systems

Yemmak reshapes production through environmentally friendly, sustainable and innovative technologies.

Visit the Yemmak website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Getting involved with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Program

by Dr Thierry Chopin, Professor Marine Biology, University of New Brunswick

This past winter, I was invited to join the Aquaculture Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) of the Seafood Watch Program of the Monterey Bay Aquarium (MBA). Initially, I was not sure exactly what my role would be or what I would be able to contribute.

 
As I was interested in understanding this elaborate program from the inside, instead of relying on what I have heard from others (both negative and positive) about this program, and because I could have an impact on its evolution, I accepted.

On May 21-22, we had our face-to-face meeting at the MBA. I was very impressed by the professionalism of the Seafood Watch team and how the Aquaculture TAC was engaged, following a 60-day public consultation period, resulting in a 29-page document.

The diversity and excellence of the expertise gathered on the 15-member Aquaculture TAC, covering many aspects of aquaculture, is also impressive. We were, I believe, sincerely listened to, as we offered our comments and recommendations on several challenges that the Seafood Watch team has encountered and intends to address in their draft revisions to the Seafood Watch Aquaculture Standard, which last underwent in-depth revisions back in October 2016.

The Seafood Watch Program
The overall approach of the Seafood Watch Program is to provide information (maintaining standards, assessing fisheries and aquaculture operations globally, improving tools for industry and governments), engage strategically (for regionally applicable improvement solutions and collaborative approaches to increase engagement and promote better understanding), and build partnerships (with industry, business, government, investors, regional staff, universities and NGOs).


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wynveen International company profile



Wynveen International B.V. is a leading Dutch company, specialising in the design, manufacture and installation of complete mills for the animal feed industry.

With a knowledgeable, experienced and enthusiastic team, the company focuses on the development and construction of high-quality innovative equipment and installations for animal feed, aqua feed and pet food manufacture.

In addition to turnkey projects, their core products are hammer mills, ribbon and paddle mixers, double-shaft paddle mixers, rotary sifters and coaters for liquids (vacuum and atmospheric).

Approximately 80 percent of their products are exported. In order to guarantee its high quality standards, Wynveen assembles and tests all its key equipment in-house.

Wynveen always aims to fully understand customer requirements, working in partnership with customers and using all their accumulated knowledge and experience to deliver the optimum, often highly innovative, technological solution.

That’s why their company motto is: ‘Versatility in feed processing’.

Visit the company website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Monday, July 22, 2019

Let’s start building bridges together!

by Antonio Garza de Yta, Ph.D

Usually, before I start writing a column, I always spend a good amount of time thinking about the subject at hand. I can tell you that for 18 years I have imagined what I could write as a thank you note in the hypothetical case that the dream of becoming president of my beloved World Aquaculture Society (WAS) became true.
 
I believe that, during those 18 years, I imagined the most eloquent phrases and paragraphs that ever came out of my mind. But today, now that one of the most important goals of my professional career has come true, I can only think of one thing to say: Thank you!

This has been an amazing journey, in which the best part is still yet to come, but during these very pleasant moments there are a couple I would like to highlight. Firstly when, as a student, I worked as a project assistant during the shrimp sessions in New Orleans.

I remember watching my academic heroes give their talks and marvelling at how many things I still had to learn. During the different WAS conferences, I met a lot of invaluable friends and colleagues and was able to expand my personal and professional horizons.

As a professional, I participated as a user on both the congress and the exhibit sides and testified how useful the WAS network of professionals really is; undoubtedly the best in the world.

When I was elected president of the Latina American and Caribbean Chapter (LACC), I could team up with magnificent people and create LACQUA, which this year will reach its seventh edition and that is the only event of the society which is not only in English, but multilingual (Spanish, Portuguese and English); which considerably increased the participation of producers and decision makers in the region.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Dinnissen company profile

  



With over 150 permanent employees and an extensive network of agents all over the world, Dinnissen is a global player in the feed, food, pharma and chemical sectors.

They are always looking for new and innovative solutions for complete processes, system integrations or standard products – many of which they develop, test and produce in-house!
 
Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Sunday, July 21, 2019

Salmon farmer’s £5.7m investment to protect stock and seals paying off

Scottish Sea Farms has reported a significant reduction in 'last resort' seal shootings as its investment in rigid new pen netting systems surpasses £5.7m.

In the first six months of the current reporting period (February 2019 – January 2020), the salmon grower saw two seal deaths across its 43-strong estate of marine farms; a reduction of five compared with the same period last year, six compared with 2017 and seven compared with 2016.
 
Sapphire Seal Pro Netting
Image credit: Scottish Sea Farms

Scottish Sea Farms' Managing Director Jim Gallagher said, 'We won't be happy until we achieve zero seal deaths, however our multi-million pound investment to roll out protective Seal Pro netting across as many of our farms as possible, as quickly as possible, is another example of our commitment to farm as responsibly and as sustainably as we can. Not only do the tougher, more rigid nets help to deter seals, but by protecting our salmon from the stress of predation and the subsequent health challenges that can cause they also contribute to fish welfare.'

With the optimum time to install the new netting systems being ahead of each new crop, Scottish Sea Farms has now equipped over half of its marine farms with Seal Pro nets at a cost of £4.2m, with a further £1.5m worth of nets set to be deployed between August and October 2019, bringing the total investment to date to £5.7m – with more to follow.


Read the full article on the International Aquafeed website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Fighting for a chemical-free aquaculture industry

by Yaki Keinan, Business Development, AquaMor

The world's population is projected to increase from the current seven billion to 9.7 billion people by 2050. Both agriculture and aquaculture will need to double yields to feed this fast-growing world population.
For agriculture, there is now megatrend growth of biological products, like biopesticides, biostimulants, microbial and 'hybrid' products at an average annual rate of 15 percent – 20 percent versus chemical pesticides, whose annual growth rate is averaging only three percent.
 
Biological products have now been accepted as an integral part of conventional agricultural, not just for organic farming.
Beyond population growth, the drivers of biological product growth in agriculture include the delisting of many if not most chemical pesticides by the EU, EPA and other regulatory agencies around the world, the resulting need to manage resistance, and consumer demands for higher quality foods which are free of chemical residues.

Similarly in aquaculture, world population growth is creating increased demand for larger and higher quality yields of fish and crustacean products, as well. While regulatory agencies do not seem to have become quite as aggressive in delisting most chemicals for use in aquaculture as they have in agriculture, this is likely to happen as consumer demands for chemical-free fish and crustaceans grow.

Public pressure for non-chemical solutions will drive increased regulation. But where are the non-chemical solutions to issues of disease and damage to fish and crustaceans in handling, transportation and other challenges within aquaculture?

How can we achieve the complete replacement of chemical treatment with natural solutions that effectively reduces disease, infection and mortality, while safeguarding natural habitats?


From vaccination, transportation and stress reduction through staving off the onslaught of parasites and bacterial diseases, chemical-free solutions are now available and being used increasingly around the world.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Liptosa company profile

  
LípidosToledo SA began in 1996 as a family business and under the guidance of a group of professionals with extensive experience in the Animal Nutrition field. 

From the outset, the company's mission has been to provide its clients with personalised service and efficient, natural products that are able to meet the demands of the sector.

In 2000 Lípidos Toledo SA moved its facilities, building a modern manufacturing plant in Talavera de la Reina (Toledo, Spain). In 2012 it acquired a new industrial warehouse in the vicinity of the main facilities where the manufacturing of the powder additives takes place and a third storage warehouse.

With these new facilities Lípidos Toledo SA is able to have separate manufacturing lines for the different products they manufacture, avoiding the risk of cross contamination.

Furthermore, the new facilities enable the company to manufacture products with fishmeal derivatives, allowing the company further expansion, mainly in the aquaculture range.

The facilities allow the manufacture of nutritional products, liquid and powder based phytobiotic additives, nutraceutical products and nutritional and specialty products without any risk of the products becoming cross contaminated.

In 2010, Lípidos Toledo SA acquired a large office space at C/ San Romualdo 12-14 in Madrid, Spain where all logistics work is carried out. This enables Lípidos Toledo SA to fulfil its objective of manufacturing products of the highest quality and providing its clients the best service.


Visit the Liptoaqua website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news



See our data and privacy policy Click here