Showing posts with label Earth Sciences. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Earth Sciences. Show all posts

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Event: Invitation to attend the 4th BioMarine Business Convention

Halifax, Canada welcomes the 4th BioMarine Business Convention from September 9 - 12, 2013. This unique four-day international business convention is co-organised by BioTopics SAS and the National ResearchCouncil of Canada (NRC). 

Dedicated to marine bio resources, marine ingredients, aquafeed and aquaculture, macro and micro algae, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, marine biotechnology for health and environment, bio materials, biofuels, renewable marine energies (tidal and offshore wind), green shipping, ports and environmentals, spatial planning, law of the sea.

The BioMarine Business Convention brings together international participants from business, science and civil society communities to discover and share innovative solutions for advancing sustainable ocean development.

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Monday, January 30, 2012

Escaped salmon fewer than expected after Hurricane Dagmar

At the Marine Harvest plant in "Juvik" in Nordfjord Norway fewer than 2000 salmon escaped, after the hurricane over the Christmas period cause two tears in the net. The damage to the nets were discovered during an extraordinary and thorough inspection in the wake of Hurricane Dagmar. The farm had around 139,000 fish with an average weight of 4 kg. It was previously unknown how many of the fish escaped but now it is thought that only around 2,000 escaped of which 547 have been recaptured.

In 2011 Marine Harvest registered three major escape events before this event in the Nordfjord. This marks a clear break with previous years' results. Marine Harvest will make a new evaluation of the events of 2011 to ensure that the company can reach its goal of zero escapes. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers. To get your copy of  'PPLAPP' click here.
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Monday, August 15, 2011

The flooding in Bangladesh is causing havoc on the fish farms

The continuos flooding in the Satkhira region of Bangladesh has caused extensive damage to the fish-farming industry in the area and also shrimp. Floods have washed away most of the shrimp enclosures and the hatcheries along with the canals creeks and ponds.

The cost of the floods is undetermined at present until the flood waters recedes but some 3400 shrimp enclosures. This event had crippled traders in the region, the floods has caused major damage to the infrastructure. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Tuesday, August 2, 2011

CEFAS Annual Report 2010-11

The Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), a UK applied marine science centre, has had a positive year. Its annual reports and accounts show that CEFAS has done well in the areas it has been involved in. CEFAS has been working in the areas of fisheries reform, marine planning, aquatic disease research and UK sea's assessment.

As part of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), CEFAS' performance is measured against ministerial targets. The report showed that all but one of these targets was met for the period 2010-11. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Woods Hole Institute study on ocean changes

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution carried out a recent study. "What the study found was that in the next 10 to 50 years many countries are going to see impacts, particularly countries that are heavily reliant on clams and oysters and mussels, and will not be able to adapt by shifting to other foods or aquaculture methods," said Jackie Savitz, senior scientist and chief strategist for the International Ocean Conservation and Advocacy Organization Oceana.

This study showed that if nothing is done then the effects would affect the poor, but  it would also affect the developed Countries like US, UK, And other European countries. The study was published in July online in the journal Fish and Fisheries. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers



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Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Microelectronic acoustic transmitters help scientist study behaviour

Researchers from the Department of Marine Sciences at the University of Almería and the Instituto Ramon Margalef are carrying out research using microelectronic acoustic transmitters, implanted in the stomach of farmed sea bream and sea bass. This is  helping the team of Spanish scientists to study the behaviour of these fish and prevent their escape.

"While aquaculture escapes are further studied in northern Europe, especially in the case of salmon and cod, in the Mediterranean there is less knowledge on this subject," said Pablo Sánchez, project coordinator. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Marine Harvests and First Nation celebrate aquaculture agreement

Three years of discussions, have ended and the result is that three First Nations and Marine Harvest have entered into a capacity-building agreement. This is the tenths agreement of its kind between Marine Harvest and the coastal First Nations. 

Ian Roberts, Marine Harvest communications manager "You want to make sure that the business that is going on in their territory is of benefit to the membership, to the bands, and provides operational security to the company," Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Shrimp Market Report - May 2011

After a strong rebound in 2010, the current year looks likely to set new trade records for shrimp thanks to strong demand and rising prices.

Japan

The tragic earthquake and accompanying tsunami in Japan is affecting world markets for food. Japan is the world’s single largest importer of fish and fishery products, and in the short term, the damage to infrastructure and the disruption in transportation and electricity transmission is negatively impacting imports, distribution and consumption of chilled and frozen products.

The earthquake and tsunami have also destroyed many fishing zones and fishing vessels, thereby reducing Japan’s ability to catch and produce fish locally. Fish processing plants have been damaged as well. 

The 2009 combined production of marine capture fisheries and marine aquaculture of the three most affected prefectures was 446 000 and 198 000 tonnes, or 11 and 17 percent respectively of the total Japanese production.

A reduction of 80 percent in production can be expected in those affected areas as a result of the tsunami. It must be borne in mind that Japan is heavily dependent on imports as well for its fish consumption so the contribution of the affected areas to total supply is actually far less. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Thursday, May 19, 2011

Aquaculture damage over 100 billion yen

The Japanese aquaculture industry suffered more than 100 billion yen (US$1.2243 billion) in damage, or a quarter of its annual output, from the March 11, earthquake and tsunami, a survey by the fisheries ministry released Wednesday said.

In tsunami-ravaged Iwate and Miyagi prefectures, the damage was particularly severe for oyster and "wakame" (brown seaweed) farming, the survey by the Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Ministry. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Fishmeal units face the heat as tsunami hits Japan

About half of the 10 manufacturers of fishmeal in and around Mangalore have suspended production owing to the changed demand scene in Japan following the earthquake-triggered tsunami. Of them, at least three exporters have sent fishmeal to Japanese ports with “no clear scene” on what has happened to what they have sent from here.

However, the suspension of production cannot be described as “closed” because fishmeal production is a seasonal activity, according to industry sources.

The tsunami has added another blow to the dull fishmeal industry already struggling with scarce and sporadic fish landing, rising prices and in recent times, a super moon-struck labour force migration that had abandoned the units to head home, they said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Friday, December 3, 2010

Aquapharm and SAMS sign agreement

Aquapharm biodiscovery, a cutting edge marine biotechnology company has signed a long term agreement with the Scottish Association of Marine Sciences (SAMS) to discover, develop and launch new marine products derived from marine microorganisms.

On signing the agreement, Aquapharm CEO Simon Best said: “Broad access to new sources of biodiversity is a key feature of Aquapharm’s business and this alliance with SAMS not only cements the bonds between two of the UK’s premier marine-focused organisations; it also ensures that Aquapharm remains one of the leaders in the commercialisation of marine science.” Read more...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.