Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Biomin company profile

http://www.aquafeed.co.uk/biomin

We at BIOMIN are dedicated to finding innovative, trend-setting solutions that
empower our customers to master existing and future challenges in animal nutrition
– the natural way. The application of our scientific know-how and expertise, based
on an in-depth understanding of our customer’s needs & concerns, enables us to
deliver solutions that support animal health, optimize performance and production
efficiency.

Research and Development
Research and development is one of the cornerstones of BIOMIN. Our strong inhouse
research and development, and global cooperation with leading institutions
and organisations form the basis by which innovative solutions are developed for our
customers. Through joint projects with renowned universities and research
institutes, BIOMIN is constantly in touch with the latest scientific know-how, from
which novel feed additives are developed and produced. Our global network of
collaborating institutions has grown to over 100.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

25/11/2014: Omega-3 and children's hearing

A scientist at the University of Oxford believes hearing is the key to dyslexia – and that a diet rich in omega-3 could help tackle children’s reading difficulties.
 

http://www.dyslexic.org.uk

The idea that our health may be determined in part by decisions made before we were born is an uncomfortable and controversial one. Yet vast amounts of data in the field of epigenetics is showing just that. And while “we are what we eat” is a cliché it may be the case that diet is related to dyslexia.

We now know there is a strong genetic contribution to dyslexia – but genes do not provide the full story. Dyslexia’s genetic landscape is comparable to that of schizophrenia: studies have found particular chromosome sites that appear to be strongly implicated in certain families. In the overall population, a series of genes called alleles have their own (weak) individual effect.

Being born with the alleles associated with dyslexia does not necessarily mean you will develop it as a child: 50 per cent of people who possess this particular genetic makeup have no difficulties reading. It merely indicates a certain vulnerability to the disorder. Instead, the difference between those who become dyslexic and those who don’t may rest on environmental factors before and after birth.

This is because alleles can be switched on or off by a biochemical process known as DNA methylation, which in turn depends on the balance of certain chemical agents in our bodies. Some believe this is controlled by diet in the early years of life and, most crucially, the diet of the mother before and during pregnancy. Gene-related defects that occur early on in development are often a consequence of which genes remain active and which do not.

The predominant theory of dyslexia has long been to class it as a “phonological processing problem”. While some dyslexic people experience visual issues, such as problems controlling eye movement, in other cases sustained difficulties in learning to read have been put down to problems with phonics – being able to split words into their constituent sounds and match them with the letters.

Scientists including professor John Stein at the University of Oxford have long been intrigued by the underlying neurological reasons behind these problems. Stein believes the answers lie with hearing. “In order to do phonics correctly, you’ve got to hear the order of sounds in the word very clearly,” he explains. “Many dyslexics hear the sounds, but they can’t get them in the right sequence because their auditory nerve cells are not working fast enough, and we think this is because of a lack of certain omega-3 fatty acids."

Source: David Cox, The Guardian

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

25/11/2014: Fish Q&A on the NY Times

Q. Why do some fish have white flesh, like flounder and tilapia, while others have red or orange flesh, like tuna and salmon?
 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/25/science/what-determines-the-color-of-fish-flesh.html?_r=1

A. The difference frequently has to do with a protein called myoglobin that stores oxygen for muscles and also acts as a pigment, said Keith G. Tidball, senior extension associate in the department of natural resources at Cornell University, reports the NY Times.
 

Fish that have white flesh are generally those that are resting or mostly inactive throughout their lives, with intermittent short bursts of activity, Dr. Tidball said. Other experts note that the fish get the energy for these bursts mostly by converting glycogen to lactate, rather than by using oxygen.

Red-fleshed fish are usually long-distance swimmers, and need high levels of oxygen for the sustained effort of their muscles, Dr Tidball said. Myoglobin is what produces the predominantly red flesh in most tuna and other open-ocean fish, like mako sharks and swordfish.

Diet may also contribute to a red flesh color, he said.

Fish with orange flesh have generally been feeding heavily on ocean crustaceans like krill, which contain pigments called carotenoids, Dr Tidball said. He listed other dietary sources for color, like freshwater crustaceans and possibly terrestrial insects.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

25/11/2014: Pacific hake mid-water trawl fishery earns MSC re-certification

The Pacific hake mid-water trawl fishery, which operates off the west coast of the United States and Canada, has achieved MSC re-certification following an independent, third-party assessment by certifier MRAG Americas.
 


The mid-water trawl fishery first achieved MSC certification as a sustainable and well-managed fishery in the fall of 2009. Pacific hake (Merluccius productus) is also known commercially as Pacific whiting.

About the Pacific hake mid-water trawl fishery
The client group of the Pacific hake fishery includes both US and Canadian participation. 


The US members, led by the Pacific Whiting Conservation Cooperative (PWCC) and the Oregon Trawl Commission (OTC), represent the majority of the onshore and at-sea hake processing sectors and the vessels that harvest the catch. The Canadian client group is led by the Association of Pacific Hake Fishermen (APHF) who represent the majority of the harvesting sector.

The management of the Pacific hake fishery is shared jointly by an international agreement between the governments of Canada and the United States. 


A joint management committee recommends the annual Total Allowable Catch (TAC), while the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in the US and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) in Canada are responsible for domestic management of their country’s fisheries. In the US, the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) recommends management and enforcement measures to NMFS, while DFO in Canada meets regularly with the Groundfish Trawl Advisory Committee (GTAC), comprised of fishers, processors, coastal community leaders and labor, First Nations and the Province of BC to review the fishery and obtain information and advice on management actions, including catch data, stock movement and any potential joint venture opportunities to be allowed. In addition, Washington coastal tribes have treaty rights that are taken into account in the management of the fishery.

The annual TAC for the Pacific hake fishery has a fixed allocation of 73.88 percent and 26.12 percent for the US and Canada, respectively. The primary commercial markets for Pacific hake are Europe, Asia and North America. It is used in producing a variety of products including surimi and frozen fillet, dressed and whole fish block markets.

Significant improvements achieved
“The combined efforts of the fishery client and fishery managers have resulted in significant completed improvements,” said Dan Waldeck, executive director, Pacific Whiting Conservation Cooperative. 


“The development of a robust US and Canada Hake Treaty process with a shared vision of science-driven, sustainable management of the hake resource also contributed to the success of the re-certification of the fishery to the MSC standard.”

“The dedication and collaboration with DFO staff both in improving the fishery management process and in communications with industry and the public greatly helped with this achievement,” said Shannon Mann with the Association of Pacific Hake Fishermen.

“We congratulate the members of the Pacific hake mid-water trawl fishery on the re-certification of this fishery to the science-based, global MSC standard,” said Dan Averill, MSC fisheries outreach manager. “The substantial improvements continue to contribute to the success of the fishery as well-managed and sustainable for this and future generations.”

About the assessment and certification
MRAG Americas, an independently accredited certifier, was the certifier for this assessment against the MSC standard. During the assessment, the three principles of the MSC standard were evaluated in detail: the status of the fish stock, the impact of the fishery on the marine ecosystem and the management system overseeing the fishery. 


The fishery completed 24 total conditions during the initial certification period and achieved re-certification with the improved total of two conditions.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Monday, November 24, 2014

Amandus Kahl company profile

http://www.aquafeed.co.uk/archive.php

More than 130 years of experience in plant and machine manufacture made us a respected manufacturer and supplier of extruders, compound feed presses, wood pelleting plants or granulate coolers, for example. 

Our motivation has always been to develop an even better product for our customers. For this reason we cooperate with research institutes and universities. You can always be sure that we shall supply you an optimally customized wood pelleting plant, grain cooking plant, waste-tyre recycling plant etc. 

Our scope of services also comprises maintenance and repair of the compacting machines, compound feed presses, extruders and wood pelleting plants as well as all other products of our company.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/11/2014: Updating to the new world of aquaculture

by Roy Palmer, Editor Asia/Pacific, International Aquafeed

Like any organisation going through what might be called ‘growing pains’ Aquaculture without Frontiers (AwF) knows that it has to change if it is to succeed in achieving its strategies and goals. Change is never easy and for organisations like AwF, which rely strongly on volunteers, it is very difficult. But change we must!
 

www.aquaculturewithoutfrontiers.org

As part of the new broom we have revisited the website and re-organised many of the headings and created new areas of activities and news. We have now posted our Strategic Plan 2014-17, added more volunteer information and completely revamped the ‘Giving & Funding’ area and created a new Education area. Please have a view of the website and give us your comments and importantly your ideas to value add to what we have done.

An important new development in the ‘Giving & Funding’ section is the involvement of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) into our program.

A new element of leadership is making a profound difference in gauging business performance: corporate social responsibility. In the past companies were judged on high performance by measuring against key business imperatives including competitive differentiation, sales, attracting and retaining talent, operational efficiency, return on investment and profitability. But today that is no longer enough.

According to Edelman’s Good Purpose Study, 67 percent of consumers say they are more likely to buy products and services from a company if they know it supports good causes, up more than 11 percent from the year before. This has seen CSR surge passed its tipping point. 


“A plethora of research points to a majority of stakeholders agreeing that CSR is a ‘must do’,” Kristian Darigan Merenda, Edelman’s senior vice president of brand and corporate citizenship was reported to say.

AwF also learned about research conducted earlier this year by Impakt Corp. which revealed that corporations that are considered leaders in terms of business performance take a common approach to CSR. According to the research, there are five interrelated criteria which form a new blueprint for the way corporations can maximise their investments in CSR: business-based social purpose; clear theory of change; quality and depth of information; concentrated effort; and partnering with experts.

As a result of being born from a world association of seafood experts and academics and engaged heavily in aquaculture AwF believes that its key corporate social leaders are within the very same industry. 


As a key ingredient in business strategy and execution, the AwF CSR program can play a central role in helping corporations to be seen as leaders. In the world of business astute corporations are allocating increasing internal resources to CSR investments that feature clear objectives and deliver measurable social outcomes.

AwF is keen to partner organisations offering the opportunity for companies to put back into developing countries through aquaculture (the world’s fastest growing primary industry producing a renewable sustainable highly nutritious protein/food). By working together we can find ways where we can help develop capacity and build capability in aquaculture. Of course, any company can get involved.

Many of the importers would likely be keen to do something but maybe have been lacking the experience that AwF can bring to the table. Hence a partnership collaboration could achieve so much for all.

If you believe that involvement in AwF’s CSR program would be beneficial to your organisation, please complete the CSR Registration form (https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CSRRegistration) and we will contact you to discuss possibilities.


Read more HERE
(IAF1406)

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/11/2014 Tongue-eating parasite for supper

A man was put right off his supper after discovering a' tongue-eating parasite' in a portion of fish he had bought from a Morrisons supermarket in the UK.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/man-finds-tongueeating-parasite-in-his-morrisons-fish-9880368.html

Paul Poli, a retired headmaster, spotted the yellow creature as he was about to enjoy a meal of sea bass, the South Wales Evening Post reported.


The 62-year-old promptly took the fish back to the store in Trostre, where the bug was identified as a cymothoa exigua - commonly known as a tongue-eating louse.


The parasite enters a fish through the gills and then attaches itself to its tongue. It proceeds to destroy the tongue before replacing it as a new host tongue. Horrifying as it sounds, this doesn’t actually harm the fish.


Mr Poli, who said the parasite was about three cm long and eight mm wide, has since received an apology as well as a bottle of wine and a UK£20 voucher from Morrisons.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news