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Thursday, April 28, 2016

28/04/2016: Video: Opening of APA2016



This video was filmed by Roy Palmer of the Association of International Seafood Professionals (AISP) on the occasion of the opening address at Asian-Pacific Aquaculture 2016 in Surabaya, Indonesia.

Roy invites you to "hear about the Indonesian story and what can happen when a government believes in making a difference."

Visit the AISP site HERE

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

28/04/2016: The Global Salmon Initiative (GSI) publishes second annual Sustainability Report at Seafood Expo Global 2016

This year’s Sustainability Report is the second published by the Global Salmon Initiative (GSI) leadership group, which now features 3 years’ worth of data for 2013, 2014 and 2015, from all 12 GSI salmon farming member companies. The report covers 14 key environmental and social sustainability indicators, including three new indicators added this year.
     

http://globalsalmoninitiative.org/
The GSI members are committed to having 100 percent of their salmon farms certified by the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) Standard by 2020; as a measure of overall sustainability, the group are using the standard as a reference point for their progress. The GSI report showcases that there are now over 70 GSI salmon farms certified by the ASC, and over 35 farms currently under assessment, a significant increase since the 9 certified in 2015 – and a strong signal of the group’s commitment to greater industry sustainability.

“The publication of the GSI’s annual Sustainability Report means we are routinely benchmarking our performance both as individual companies, and as an industry sector. The report both acts as a reference point for our success but also continuously encourages us to look for new approaches to enhance our sustainability performance,” said Per Grieg, GSI Co-Chair and Chairman of the Board, Grieg Seafood ASA.

“As we review our progress and continue to look for ways to develop, we, the GSI, see cooperation as the main driver behind making these improvements on a greater scale and at an accelerated pace”.

The launch of the second report allows the public access via the Global Salmon Initiative website to review and track the progress of each company over the past 3 years.

“Significant change takes time, and, while we are pleased to see movement in the right direction, as an industry, we know there are still challenges we must face and that a lot more work can be done,” said Sady Delgado, GSI Co-Chair and CEO of Los Fiordos.
   
“However, by sharing this information in such a transparent manner we hope to reinforce our message to stakeholders and customers that we see improved transparency and sustainability as critical elements of our future, and are committed to making these changes our highest priority.”
    
http://globalsalmoninitiative.org/
Image: Liz Lawley
The GSI’s Sustainability Report is the first industry-wide report of its kind and sets transparency at an unprecedented level within the food sector. As global human populations rise and demand for protein sources continues to increase, consumers today are considering a number of factors when making purchasing decisions, including sustainability. For this reason, the GSI report also includes key production information for the five main sources of animal protein – salmon, chicken, beef, lamb and pork – demonstrating that farmed salmon offers one of the most sustainable sources of protein available.

The report provides data across the following areas: fish escapes; fish mortality; antibiotic use; sea lice counts; sea lice treatments; non-medicinal methods; wildlife interactions; use of marine ingredients in feed; certifications and environmental licenses; compliance; occupational health and safety; interactions with the local community; direct labor; and R&D investment.

GSI’s annual Sustainability Report is one element of the group’s work that supports its mission of improving the industry’s sustainability performance and reinforces its continuing efforts in the following focus areas: 
  • Identifying alternative sources of sustainable fish oil replacements to support the long-term future of the industry 
  • Working towards 100 percent of GSI salmon farms being ASC certified by 2020 
  •  Improving fish health through accelerating developments in biosecurity management
The full Sustainability Report and more information on the work of the GSI can be found at their website HERE.  


The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

27/04/2016: Brewers’ yeast products - excellent for use in aquafeeds

https://issuu.com/international_aquafeed/docs/iaf1602_w1/18
by Dr Holger Kühlwein, Leiber GmbH, Germany

First published in International Aquafeed, March-April 2016


Brewers’ yeast and derived products have been successfully used in animal nutrition, including aquafeeds, for several decades now. Leiber GmbH, with two production sites in Germany and further facilities in Poland and Russia, have manufactured brewers’ yeast products for more than 60 years.

The following article will shed more light on production background, well-known properties as well as new insights into by-products of beer production and their efficient use in aquaculture.

Reinheitsgebot: German Purity Laws

Beer brewing has a centuries-long tradition, and especially the famous Reinheitsgebot, sometimes called the “German Purity Law” of beer brewing. From the year 1516, this regulation has enormously contributed to the great acceptance of beer as a highquality, food-grade product.

Read the full article in International Aquafeed HERE.  
 
 
  

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Dinnissen company profile

http://www.dinnissen.nl/

With over 150 permanent employees and an extensive network of agents all over the world, Dinnissen is a global player in the feed, food, pharma and chemical sectors. We are always looking for new and innovative solutions for complete processes, system integrations or standard products – many of which we develop, test and produce in-house!
 
Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

27/04/2016: White Paper published today on insect protein for feed

PROteINSECT project’s key publication recommends review of insect protein legislation & funding to help address European protein deficit
  • PROteINSECT fish feeding trials demonstrated insect meal can replace up to 50 percent of feed without affecting animal performance
  • PROteINSECT pig feeding trials revealed improved gut health in piglets
  • PROteINSECT poultry feeding trials showed that chickens fed on insect-containing diets performed as well as those fed on commercial diets
Following three years of international research into the potential of insect protein in animal feed, the EC-funded PROteINSECT project has published a White Paper setting out recommendations for future use of this additional protein source in Europe.

Since 2013, experts from Europe, China and Africa have been investigating the use of two species of fly larvae in the diets of chicken, pigs and fish, carrying out feeding trials and analysing quality and safety of rearing farmed flies on organic waste substrates such as manure.

Their research findings are summarised in the White Paper published today (Wednesday 27 April) along with recommended next steps to help European policy makers, legislators, industry and consumers grasp ‘the insect opportunity’.
   
http://www.proteinsect.eu/
Image: Gilles San Martin
The document, titled Insect Protein – Feed for the Future: Addressing the need for feeds of the future today, encompasses safety, nutritional value, environmental impact, commercialisation and consumer acceptance of insect protein in animal feed.  It endorses two key actions:
  1. A review of Regulation EC 999/2001 and Regulation EC 1069/2009, which prohibit a) the use of insects as a source of protein for animal feed for animals raised for human consumption; and b) the rearing of insects on manure or catering waste, respectively.
  2. A commitment to undertake the necessary research to ensure that the required evidence is available for the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to carry out a full risk profile for insects reared on organic wastes (building on EFSA’s ‘Risk profile related to production and consumption of insects as food and feed’ published in October 2015)
Dr Elaine Fitches, PROteINSECT project co-ordinator, says, “We are delighted to share our White Paper as a key stepping stone towards furthering our understanding of the potential for the use of insects in animal feed in Europe.”

Copies of the White Paper have already been distributed to key members of the European Parliament and it will be formally presented at PROteINSECT’s final conference taking place in Brussels today.

PROteINSECT’s White Paper is designed to safeguard the impact and legacy of its research, ensuring that the potential of insects to make a valuable contribution to existing and future animal feed demand in Europe is fully realised.

“The protein gap in Europe is a very real risk to social, economic and environmental progress,” says Dr Fitches.

“As we seek sustainable European long term solutions we must consider the benefits that the introduction of insects - specifically fly larvae - could have on the content of animal feed.  PROteINSECT believes these highly effective protein converters offer great potential for Europe to become global contributors to the provision of alternative and additional innovative protein sources.”

Visit the PROteINSECT site HERE


Download the White Paper HERE.


The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

27/04/2016: Masters courses in aquaculture at Harper Adams University

http://harper.ac.uk/aquaculture
MRes (Masters in Research) MSc (Masters by taught courses and project)

Harper Adams University in England are proud to offer unique opportunities for post graduate training in aquaculture with a focus on fish nutrition, feed technology, fish health management and welfare, business and marketing leading to the award of Masters.

Based in beautiful rural England, within a first class campus setting you will experience academic excellence in selected multidisciplinary subjects underpinning the aquaculture sector with experts in the field and links with key industries and stake-holders. You will be supported by a strong academic team in the key specialised areas in a format comprising intensive short modules delivered on a one week block.

Harper Adams is uniquely positioned due to its long history of the agritech sciences and terrestrial animal production (poultry, pigs and ruminants) and related food sciences that can provide new innovative approaches to similar issues in fish culture systems.

Students will gain from the latest developments in the science and technology of this rapidly expanding sector of agribusiness on a local, national, European and global scale.

The programmes are run over a one year period and we have now received Advanced Training Partnerships with associated institutions to promote modules on fish health and disease as well as nutrition and feed technology. The modules and course would appeal to graduates in marine biology, fisheries & aquatic sciences and environmental biology.
    
http://harper.ac.uk/aquaculture
Image: Aqua Mechanical
Animal nutrition, production and veterinary biosciences students as well as veterinarians would advance their knowledge and skills in aquaculture. There are considerable opportunities for jobs in aquaculture where increasingly training with experience is required and a Masters is also a natural progression to higher degrees such as a PhD.

A major component is the project element that spans about 5 months for the typically taught MSc course and ~7 months for the MRes Masters encompassing research training and the project as the main focus for the programme.

The Masters programmes have been fully validated academically and endorsed by industry and can be taken on a part-time basis as well as full-time. With agreement, many students may undertake the project at locations within the UK or abroad in specialist facilities or at their work place if feasible.

Harper Adams University has excellent science laboratories and is currently developing new fish holding facilities for research and training on campus. The university was recently awarded the status of ‘University of the Year’ in Britain by students nationally.
  
Enquiries for enrolment and tuition costs can be made to:

Heather Hogan,
Taught Postgraduate officer
+44 (0)1952 81 5289
postgraduate@harper-adams.ac.uk

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

27/04/2016: ASC releases terms of reference for marine finfish standard development

http://www.asc-aqua.org/
The Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) has released Terms of Reference (ToR) for the development of new marine finfish standards.

The announcement was made against the backdrop of Seafood Expo Global 2016 in Brussels and represents a first for the ASC. The ToR advocates the development of standards for new marine finfish species based on the soon to be released standard for seriola and cobia.

Because the knowledge and expertise necessary for the development of standards for seriola, cobia and, in come cases salmon, is applicable to the development of standards for similar fish and farming systems, the forthcoming release of the seriola and cobia standard creates an opportunity to test the applicability of the standard to expand the programme. This is the first time the ASC has taken such an approach.

“The increasing demand for healthy protein has lead to a steep rise in aquaculture production around the world,” said Chris Ninnes, CEO of ASC.

“With fish increasingly becoming essential to global food supply, concerns about the effects of fish farming on people and the ecosystem have escalated. Ensuring people —those who work on the farm and those living in the surrounding community— are protected from harmful practices is paramount for businesses; and a key feature of the ASC standards. It is therefore important that the ASC establishes standards for fish types not currently covered by the programme to further protect the aquatic environment and make sure that farms operate to the best social standard.”

The ToR is a direct result of the many requests ASC has received to create a standard for barramundi, European seabass and seabream. If it is determined that using the seriola and cobia standard is feasible this will provide a quicker route to the creation of standards for new species.

As a market-based programme, the ASC must find ways to effectively respond to the needs of the growing community of farms and retail partners seeking certification for an increasing range of species. This new process could be an innovative way to leverage efficiencies across the organisation in order to respond more quickly to calls for new standards that will help farmers, workers, local communities and improve environmental protection.
   
http://www.asc-aqua.org/
Image: David Elwood
The ASC standards address the negative impacts of fish farming, including dependence on fish for feed; inadequate supply of seed; lack of appropriate techniques; discharges of organic matters, phosphorus, and nitrogen; fish escapes; transfer of diseases parasites between farmed and wild fish; and introduction of non-indigenous species. It also mandates that all workers have freedom of association, employment contracts inline with ILO regulations, no child-labour and that the communities in which farms are situated be consulted on farm operations.
    
As part of a comprehensive programme that expands the use of responsible practices in the aquaculture industry, the ASC makes a significant contribution to mitigating negative impacts ‘on the water’, especially in countries where best practices for environmental and social responsibility are not yet the norm. A unique feature of the programme is the use of performance metrics to measure impacts of farming.

The ToR for marine finfish will officially begin with a field test of the seriola and cobia standard on selected finfish farms that have informed the ASC that they wish to be included in these initial pilots. No certificate is expected from the preliminary field-testing, however the results will help identify gaps between the existing seriola and cobia standard and what may be necessary to create a robust certification for other marine finfish. The feasibility of addressing these gaps will be evaluated, changes will be proposed and consulted on and a process to operationalise the new standard will be developed.

In the event that the pilot demonstrates that the use of the seriola and cobia standard is not feasible, the results of the pilot would provide important information to speed up the development of on-going and future standard development processes.

This ToR and associated pilot activity will also inform the emerging structure of ASC’s core standard development.

The document is now open for public comments and all feedback should be submitted using the form provided in the Annex to the ToR on the ASC website. Farms wishing to engage in the pilot assessments should contact an accredited certifier to undertake the audit and register interest with the ASC.

Transparency is integral to the ASC programme and all information regarding the standard setting process, including field-testing results, will be found on the ASC website HERE.
 


The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news