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Thursday, June 29, 2017

29/06/2017: PIT tagging: monitoring and management for brood stock and genetic research programmes

by Kirstyn McKay, Biomark Inc., US

Biomark Inc., a US based company, has been selling passive integrated transponders (PIT tags) for over 28 years to permanently identify individual animals

Beginning with fisheries conservation studies, the use of PIT tags has expanded to include mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds and many other animals and objects. More recently, the aquaculture industry has embraced this technology realising the value of PIT tag technology use as a reliable and effective method of research, monitoring, and management of individual animals. As a result, Biomark has expanded their sales and customer service staffing to include representation worldwide.
 
Tagging juvenile tilapia with the pre-load
needle system. 
Image credit: Biomark

PIT tags: What they do

PIT tags, also known as ‘microchips’ or electronic identification (EID), allow researchers to safely mark most species internally without altering external appearance. In almost all cases, the tag will stay with the animal for its entire life cycle.

The small size of PIT tags virtually eliminates any negative impact on animals with little or no influence on growth-rate, behavior or health when tagged using best practices and methods. PIT tags do not have a battery so the microchip remains inactive until read with a scanner (reader). The reader sends a low frequency signal to the microchip within the PIT tag providing the power needed by the tag to send its unique identification code back to the reader and positively identify the animal.

The distance from which a tag can be read is referred to as read range. Many factors contribute to the read range of passive tags including tag construction, quality of components, manufacturing standards, operation frequency, antenna power and size, tag orientation and electromagnetic interference (EMI) from other devices.

PIT tags are detected in milliseconds at close range - from a few centimeters up to about one meter or more in distance. Tags can be read through materials such as soil, wood and water. Ferrous metals and noisy (EMI) environments can cause interference between the electromagnetic communication of the reader and tag, and adversely affect tag reading.

“Not all created equal”

Not all PIT tags are created equal. At visual inspection, there is no way to tell a quality tag from a low cost, low performing tag. There are a few things to keep in mind to ensure that the quality of construction, durability, tag code integrity and performance are not compromised.

There is an ISO standard for PIT tags (ISO 11784/11785). Using tags and reader that comply with these standards will ensure frequency and reading compatibility. PIT tags should also be approved and certified by the International Committee for Animal Recording (ICAR) for quality, reliability and, more importantly, the guarantee that the tags will all have a unique ID code with no duplications.

Using tags that are specifically made for animal use is important along with selecting a manufacturer that specialises in aquaculture and conservation PIT tags and related equipment. Biomark engineers, manufactures and distributes PIT tags and readers that are designed specifically for the aquaculture and conservation market. As a result of conducting their own manufacturing they are able to ensure their tags and readers provide the highest quality and performance options available in PIT tag technology for aquaculture use.

PIT tags are typically injected subcutaneously using a hypodermic needle. Implant location varies depending on the species being tagged, size (age) and in some cases the behavior of the animal. Tags are available in many packaging formats whilst a unique pre-loaded tagging system was recently developed.

The pre-load system (PLT) consists of a tray of 100 tags loaded into single use needles and a double push-rod design eliminating the need for hand loading tags or sterilising needles between uses. This method not only saves significant time and money but also results in tag shed and mortality reduction.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Amandus Kahl company profile



More than 130 years of experience in plant and machine manufacture have made Amandus Kahl a respected manufacturer and supplier of extruders, compound feed presses, wood pelleting plants or granulate coolers, for example.

The company’s motivation has always been to develop an even better product for their customers. For this reason they cooperate with research institutes and universities. You can always be sure that they will supply you an optimally customised wood pelleting plant, grain cooking plant, waste-tyre recycling plant etc.

Their scope of services also comprises maintenance and repair of the compacting machines, compound feed presses, extruders and wood pelleting plants as well as all other products they offer in their company.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

29/06/2017: A new surveillance camera for the aquaculture industry

World Aquaculture 2017 sees the release of the DTPod a 360 degree viewing camera with pan & tilt

In the exciting world of underwater robotics, Deep Trekker is a global leader in rugged and portable submersible robots. Today, Deep Trekker is pleased to announce their newest product line, the DTPod.
 
Deep Trekker DTPod in a cage
Image credit: Deep Trekker

This submersible surveillance camera is designed for both drop camera inspections and permanent installations, providing instant video to the surface from underwater. Deep Trekker’s DTG2 and DTX2 underwater drones (Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) are operating in more than 80 countries globally; their flagship products becoming the “go to” tool for a multitude of underwater industries.

With an innovation award from the North American Society for Trenchless Technology, the recent release of a 4K camera upgrade to the DTG2 and DTX2 ROVs, and the launch of the uniquely designed magnetic DT640 Utility Crawler, 2017 has been an incredible year thus far.

In keeping with the forward momentum driven by listening to customer feedback and a desire to continue to implement innovative technology, Deep Trekker is pleased to introduce the DTPod. The DTPod is designed to be installed as a permanent fixture or used as a drop camera.

The handheld controller is able to relay real time visuals and data to the surface by simply plugging in the controller topside and having the 360 pan and tilt camera go to work. The same splash proof controller can allow access to an entire fleet of installed cameras without having to maneuver large, bulky equipment or risk a laptop near water.

The DTPod will allow fish farmers to have easy access to their nets, moorings and fish behaviour. Likewise, the DTPod can also be utilised as a convenient option for structural inspections, such as tanks or bridges. The design principals are based on the same favourite features of other Deep Trekker products; portability, durability, ease of use, and low cost of ownership.

The DTPod is built with rugged 316 stainless steel to withstand long installations, even at great depths (depth rating options of 300m (1000ft). Additional options include zoom camera upgrades, wipers and thrusters when working in high current areas. Equipped with a low light HD camera and powerful LED floodlights, the camera delivers high quality imagery, making it the perfect addition to underwater ROVs.

Deep Trekker is no stranger to Aquaculture operations, the DTG2 ROV is the defacto-standard among aquaculture farm sites.

An example is a global leader in Aquaculture, Marine Harvest, "We have been using DTG2 smart unit for more than a year now in our aquaculture operations. It worked really well for us. It took away a lot of costly dive time. This was the low cost, portable and easy to operate machine at the time we bought. I believe, it still is. The best things about this purchasing this machine is, ease of operation, very cooperative sales team and best after sale support and service. Very low down time observed with the machine too as most of minor repairs can be done on site", said Jayaprabandh Pudota, Harmful Plankton Monitor/Technician

The DTPod design came as a response to the growing demand of aquaculture operations to have a permanent installation to quickly access to view specific areas of a site. This addition provides an ideal complement to the DTG2 and DTX2 “free swimming drones”, by providing a constant view of a specific area, while the ROVs are maneuverered to inspect nets and other areas of interest.

About Deep Trekker
Deep Trekker Inc. was founded in 2010 with a mission to create portable, affordable, and easy to use underwater inspection tools. The company is headquartered in Ontario Canada, with engineering and manufacturing all completed in house. These robust underwater robots are currently being used around the world in industries such as aquaculture, commercial diving, municipalities, police search and rescue, military, and research.

Visit the Deep Trekker website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

28/06/2017: European approval of insect protein in fish feed welcomed

Image courtesy of nextProtein
 The European Commission is to be congratulated for officially approving insect protein for aquaculture feed, next protein says. 

 The French-Tunisian agritech startup welcomed the recent decision by EU regulators to officially allow insect protein to be fed to farmed fish. 

 The European Commission officially authorised insect-based processed animal proteins (PAPs) as feed for aquaculture animals on May 24, 2017, through a change to Annex IV of Regulation 999/2001, with the regulation text to come into effect on July 1 this year. 

 Co-founder and Chief Operating Officer Syrine Chaalala commented, "We welcome the European Commission's official ruling on this important reform for the aquaculture industry. With then vast majority of farmed fish relying on fishmeal and the depletion of our marine ecosystems, insect-based proteins offer the aquaculture industry a more sustainable way to ensure fish for human consumption."

 She continued, "Our insects are fed on organic waste, namely fruit and vegetables from markets, so allowing insect-based protein supplies like ours we can alleviate the pressure on severely depleted wild fish stocks." 

 Visit the nextProtein website here. 

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

28/07/2017: Insects in aquaculture feed after two decades

"Garden soldier fly on compost" by John Tann, Flickr
 From July 1, 2017, using insects in aquaculture feed will be authorised for the first time in nearly 20 years after it was banned in 1998 due to the BSE crisis. 

 Multibox is a circular economy company, based at the Royal Agricultural University's Farm491, an agricultural innovation centre, where they are developing an insect meal from Black Soldier Fly larvae fed on food waste. Multibox wants to become the world\s lowest cost producer of insects for the aquaculture industry. 

 17 percent of animal protein eaten by humans comes from fish, around 167 million tonnes in 2014 of which 93 million tonnes of the wild capture fish are used to produce fishmeal and fish oil much of which is used to feed fish in farms. This use of wild capture fish is not sustainable, particularly as wild fish captures have remained constant since 1990 but the demand for farmed fish has been growing at 3.5 percent per annum. 

 Around a quarter of UK food, 10 million tonnes in 2014, is wasted between the farm gate and the consumer at a cost of £38 billion per annum. Multibox's insects are fed on this food waste, making the meal and oil completely sustainable. 

 The company plans to build commercial scale insect farms and bring three products to market in the next 18 months, an insect meal which is used as a substitute for fishmeal in aquafeed, an insect oil to be used in aquaculture, pig and poultry feeds and insect excrement that can be used as a fertiliser. The fertiliser will be used to improve yields in agriculture, horticulture and hydroponics. These three products will initially be produced in the UK.

 Managing Director, Paul Wright comments, "The EU's decision to alter the processed animal products legislation has opened the doors for companies like us to work with the waste producers and the animal feed manufacturers to deliver a sustainable high quality fish feed whilst ensuring we leave the planet in a better condition for future generations." 

 Director of Farming and Value Creation, James Wright remarks, "I'm excited about the potential for farming Black Soldier Flies. We know from research that it is a like-for-like replacement for fishmeal and can be produced on waste. The issue has always been - can we up-scale the insect farming process to produce enough insects to meet industry demand and we are sure we can. 

 Visit the Multibox Farm491 website here. 

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

28/06/2017: Biofouling-free, low maintenance and mortality-rate-reducing – why we need recyclable brass nets in offshore aquaculture

by Martin Heidenreich, Wieland-Werke AG, Germany

Whereas the demand for fish is increasing worldwide from year to year, fish stocks are overfished


For this reason, marine aquaculture today is becoming more important and is facing tremendous challenges. This implies, in particular, that the requirements for cage systems are growing significantly. The main reasons include environmental compatibility, low contaminant levels in fish and better growth, recyclability of materials, service life of systems, algal growth/biofouling, control of parasites (sea lice) as well as increasing cost pressure in the fish production.
 
Wieland Bluesea net installed for customer InnovaSea in Panama
Image credit: ©InnovaSea Systems Inc

So, how can such complex problems be tackled?
The use of brass nets in marine aquaculture is an innovative and “green” solution to many problems. The brass nets provide considerable improvement over traditional cages. Bluesea is a brass wire produced by Wieland that has been especially developed for the needs of maritime fish farming.

In addition to its excellent corrosion resistance also in seawater environments, the copper content of this alloy is sufficient to inhibit biofouling in a natural way. Especially for large cages, high mechanical strength and good abrasion resistance are of decisive advantage. Lower susceptibility to biofouling due to the copper content improves the water exchange and the oxygen level inside the cages.

As a result, growth of parasites (sea lice) and other pathogens is inhibited and the infection risk in fish is significantly reduced. Thus it is not necessary to use antibiotics and antifouling coatings. The nets are practically free from biofouling and therefore the cleaning and inspection intervals of the nets are much longer than those of synthetic netting materials.

This will dramatically reduce maintenance costs. Due to the high stability of the copper alloy nets, the cages retain their form even with strong currents and high waves. In addition, brass is completely recyclable and thus it is a sustainable material in aquaculture.

Naturally clean: Release of copper ions prevents biofouling
Biofouling presents an enormous challenge for fish farmers. Conventional methods to prevent biofouling are expensive and harmful to the environment. The antimicrobial properties of the Bluesea nets have a positive effect on the growth: no biofouling, no time-consuming cleaning of the nets and, therefore, significantly lower maintenance costs.

Since fish farming is sited more and more away from the coast under open sea conditions, preventing biofouling is an essential factor for the stability of the nets, for avoiding fish escapes and also for the safety of the workers. The resistance of copper is achieved by the gradual release of copper ions so Bluesea does not release increased copper concentrations into the environment.

The Wieland Bluesea net is naturally free from biofouling, which reduces sea lice levels and prevents sea lice larvae from settling on cages. Settlement of mussels and small crustaceans is also limited because they cannot find food (algae). Bluesea nets meet the essential requirements of “Green Licenses” for aquaculture and provide, therefore, a sustainable solution for the development of aquaculture.

Fish health
Improving the habitat of fishes will have positive effects on their growth. This contributes to increasing the profits of fish farmers, since infections of fish caused by biofouling organisms can be avoided. In Australia fish farmers can abstain from antibiotics or chemical treatments in salmon farming by using Bluesea nets. Numerous tests show a decrease in the mortality rate of fish when using brass nets.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Andritz company profile


ANDRITZ is a globally leading supplier of plants, equipment, and services for hydropower stations, the pulp and paper industry, the metalworking and steel industries, and for solid/liquid separation in the municipal and industrial sectors.

The publicly listed technology Group is headquartered in Graz, Austria, and has a staff of almost 25,000 employees. ANDRITZ operates over 250 sites worldwide.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news