Thursday, September 18, 2014

18/09/2014: Fish faarmers list on the share market in Australia


Australia’s $40 billion aquaculture industry is expected to boom by the end of this decade as the country’s biggest fish farmers Tassal and Cleanseas turn their fortunes around and inspire others to list on the Australian share market.

Huon Aquaculture is considering listing on the Australian Securities Exchange in a float that could be worth Aus$400 million.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

18/09/2014: VIUSID aqua from Catalysis

Catalysis' product VIUSID aqua

A specific product to improve productivity of aquaculture




Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

18/09/2014: Soft Robotic Fish: New Invention at MIT

IFL Science have invented a great new device with many applications and potential for fish farmers.

A soft robotic fish that was developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), by
Andrew Marchese, is reported to be capable of movement similar to that of a real fish. This "self-contained autonomous soft robot" can perform rapid movement, and by convulsing its body it can carry out escape maneuvers to change direction almost as quickly as a real fish can. 
 
Soft robotics is a relatively new field of robotics, which has earned its own journal- Soft Robotics. This field involves the development of robots from soft materials, making them flexible and ideal for movement around limited spaces, with the ability to change gait (locomotion achieved through movement) easily. Daniela Rus, director of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, who also helped to design and build the fish, is very excited about this research. "As robots penetrate the physical world and start interacting with people more and more, it's much easier to make robots safe if their bodies are so wonderfully soft that there's no danger if they whack you."

One of the draws to soft robotics is that, in contrast to other robotic systems whereby collisions with the environment result in inefficient motion, collision may actually aid in their locomotion. This is because soft robots can "use these points of contact as a means of getting to the destination faster," according to Rus in MIT's announcement of the research. 
This particular fish was built by first using a 3D printer to generate molds, which were then used to cast the head and tail from silicone rubber. A polymer ring was used to protect the fish's "guts" (electronics). It runs on carbon dioxide, and in its current form can perform around 20-30 escape maneuvers before running out. Marchese says, "the fish was designed to explore performance capabilities, not long-term operation," although he adds "Next steps for future research are taking that system and building something that's compromised on performance a little bit but increases longevity." The new fish will involve a water pump instead of carbon dioxide.

But researchers don't plan on just watching these fish swim around for the fun of it. Rus hopes that these fish can be applied to study fish in their natural habitat. They could be used to infiltrate schools of fish, allowing scientists to gather data on the behaviour of these animals in the wild.

Check out this YouTube video for more info on the fish:


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

18/09/2014: Muyang to showcase FAMSUN brand feed-to-meat solutions at VIV China 2014

A new pellet mill launch, the first presence of its animal farming systems and a booth of 445.5m2 await FAMSUN’s customers and visitors to VIV China next week, 23-25 September.

FAMSUN
The wide international reach of VIV and its coverage of all sectors in the animal protein production chain provide an ideal platform for FAMSUN to introduce its latest products to the industry.

The 35T/H pellet mill to be unveiled is the first gear drive press in FAMSUN pellet mill family. It is developed by the European R&D Institute of Muyang Company. Driven by a 250 kW motor, the robust machine can produce high quality pellets steadily above 35 tons per hour without downtime. Besides the exhibited press, a model of 25T/H capacity is also available for this gear drive series to meet different production demands.

For aquafeed producers and people who interesting in improving production efficiency, the FAMSUN MY 120×2 Twin-Screw Extruder and the FAMSUN-WEM Automation System backed by bountiful proven data from production practices will give out solutions.

It will also be the first time that the FAMSUN animal farming family presents itself at VIV trade shows. FAMSUN delicate cage raising systems, flat raising steel structure houses and pig penning systems as well as farm climate control systems will be seen on the 445.5m2 booth.      

For more information, please visit FAMSUN booth at W1.E032.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

17/09/2014: Bangladeshie fish farmers lose tax privileges

Report by Sohel Parvez
 

The National Board of Revenue yesterday withdrew tax privileges for fish farming to rein in tax-dodging by a section of dishonest taxpayers who allegedly shift income from other sources to fisheries to evade tax.
 
http://www.thedailystar.net/business/fish-farming-loses-tax-privileges-41837
Corruption puts tax relief in doubt

The existing tax rate of three percent on income from fish cultivation will no longer be effective, the NBR said in a notice. Income from the sector will be subject to normal tax rates, it said.

"It means the tax rate for companies involved in fish farming will be 35 percent. And individuals having income from fish cultivation will pay tax at normal rates depending on their income levels," an NBR official said, asking not to be named.

The NBR move comes after it found that a section of corrupt people, including some politicians, businesses and government officials, took advantage of the tax benefit in fish cultivation and claimed to have incomes from such business.

In July last year, the NBR offered the reduced tax rate for fish farming and some other areas to encourage diversification and increase the supply of protein.

The privilege was given for two years beginning from July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2015. Prior to the reduced rate, five percent tax was applicable to income from fish cultivation. Taxmen said it is difficult to assess fish stocks in ponds and one can claim any amount of income from such farming.

The advantage was taken by some people to dodge taxes and legalise illegal earnings. "We have found that the opportunity was misused," the NBR official said.

Taxmen said some people having fish farms show excessive amounts of income from farming by diverting incomes from other taxable sources.

Another group of people do not have fish farms but they claim to have incomes from such business. "But our field officials do not find any ponds during inspection, and these people claim the farms are either closed or the ponds have dried up," he said.

"As a result, we were losing a huge amount to revenue." Farming of fish, including shrimp, expanded during the past three decades, particularly in the north-eastern, north and south-western regions.

Production of fish from cultivation more doubled to 18.59 lakh tonnes in fiscal 2012-13 from 8.56 lakh tonnes a decade ago, according to the Department of Fisheries.

Cultivated fish accounts for more than half of the supply of 34.10 lakh tonnes a year.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

17/09/2014: Students develop cheap water treatment system using chip packets

by Justine Alford 

A team of students at the University of Adelaide, Australia, has designed an elegantly simple yet efficient water treatment system using empty chip packets, some plywood and glass tubing. What’s more, the whole thing cost just Aus$67 and doesn’t require skilled engineers to assemble, making it ideal for remote communities with no access to clean water.
 
http://www.iflscience.com/technology/students-develop-cheap-water-treatment-system-using-chip-packets
Photo credit: Kara LaFleur, "Delhi-1," via Flickr. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

In the Western world, most of us probably take our taps and bottled water for granted. Safe water is something that millions of people across the globe do not have the privilege to access. According to the CDC, around 1 in 9 people, or 780 million individuals, don’t have access to improved drinking water sources. Drinking unsafe water exposes individuals to a variety of pathogens that often cause diarrheal diseases, among others. It’s estimated that 1.5 million people, 90% of whom are children, die each year from consuming dirty water.

Determined to make a difference, University of Adelaide scientists teamed up with ChildFund Australia to learn about the water problems faced by many communities in Papua New Guinea (PNG). They often rely on large tanks to collect rainwater which are easily contaminated with disease-causing microbes.

“Our priority was to develop a system with, and not just for, the end-users,” lead researcher Dr Cristian Birzer said in a news-release. 


“We wanted something where we could provide design guidelines and let the local communities build and install their own systems using readily available materials that could easily be maintained and replaced.”

The team started off by developing an efficient water treatment system using high-quality materials. Then, using this as a basis for design, they built a rudimentary version using much cheaper materials. Their finished product works by guiding sunlight towards water inside a glass tube with the help of a half cylinder lined with reflective foil chip packets. The Sun’s UV-A radiation then stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species in the water which can irreversibly damage pathogens’ DNA, ultimately causing them to die. 


The students tried out various different reflective materials and found that chip packets, which are a common trash item, worked just as well as anything else. In less than 30 minutes, the innovative system could reduce high concentrations of E. coli to undetectable levels.

According to Birzer, the team wanted to avoid the “white man solution” by coming up with a tailor-made solution to a real problem that PNG communities face.

“The final design is something that anyone can make, so it’s not a product we’re giving, it’s just a concept, a design that anyone can make and therefore they own it - it’s theirs,” Birzer told ABC News.

Costing just Aus$67, the system can clean up almost 40 liters of water in just four hours. If several systems are installed together, then larger quantities can be treated to meet the needs of larger villages.

According to ABC News, ChildFund are due to start trials of the device shortly in PNG. If successful, the concept will be rolled out across the country to rural villages in need.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

17/09/2014: New CEO appointed for the BioMar Group

Torben Svejgard, who has been Group CEO in BioMar since 2008, has resigned from his position in order to focus on a career as a full-time board member. The BioMar board has appointed Vice President Carlos Diaz as new Group CEO. He will take over the seat from Torben Svejgard sometime towards the end of the year.
 

http://www.biomar.com/en/Corporate/News/New-CEO-appointed-for-the-BioMar-Group/
New CEO appointed for the BioMar Group

Torben Svejgard says about his decision: "My 6 years with BioMar has been fantastic. Aquaculture is an exciting industry and BioMar is a wonderful company with wonderful and smart people. It has thus been a very difficult decision for me to resign, but this is the right time for me to withdraw from the executive life and seek a new career path as a non-executive."

Chairman of the board, Jens Bjerg Sorensen, says: "First I want to thank Torben for his contribution to BioMar's development over the past 6 years. His successor Carlos has been with BioMar since 2000 and after a strong career in the Chilean organisation he has during the last years broadened his responsibility area successfully, so he today has responsibility for the two Regions Americas and Continental Europe and on top of that he is the overall responsible for business development. I and the board are thus confident that we in Carlos have a strong Group CEO, who can lead the company towards new heights."

Carlos Diaz is 45 years old, has a background as a veterinarian and holds an MBA with specialization in marketing and commercial management. Before BioMar he has been working in the aquaculture industry in some Chilean companies, as well as in the pharmaceutical industry.

Commenting his appointment Carlos Diaz says: " I am pleased and happy to take this new professional challenge in my career and contribute to consolidate and grow BioMar as a global leader in fish feed. I am sure that with all the good people in the company we can continue making a difference and creating value for our customers, employees and shareholders".



Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news