Tuesday, August 19, 2014

19/08/2014: Ukrainian Fish Farming: Opportunities for growth

On June 27, 2014 Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko signed an ‘Association Agreement’ with the European Union. Many Ukrainian’s are hopeful that the signing of this agreement will mark a change in the economic fortunes in a country where economic growth has lagged behind its neighbours in recent years.



Read more features HERE

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

19/08/2014: Steelhead trout strike back with new, powerful ally

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/steelhead-631923-forest-canyon.htmlIn the turf war between man and trout, man inevitably wins, reports AARON ORLOWSKI a staff writer for the Orange County Register in California.

"And the Southern California steelhead trout – an endangered species with a population a tenth of its former size – is suffering greatly as people destroy its habitat.

"Engineers armor streams, casting concrete channels on them to contain flooding. Home developers suck streams dry to water lawns. Builders raise dams to collect water and irrigate precious farmland, inevitably blocking fish from their upstream spawning grounds.

"But in the Santa Ana Mountains, the fish – with a powerful ally – have struck back.

"In 2012, the US Forest Service launched its Southern California steelhead recovery program. Toward that end, the agency started tearing down dams across the region that block the steelhead trout from historic and potential future spawning grounds.

"Next month, the Forest Service is scheduled to dismantle four dams in Holy Jim Canyon in the Santa Ana Mountains, according to the fire chief there, though Forest Service officials say the precise timing is still undetermined."

STEELHEAD FACTS

  • Steelhead trout spawn in coastal rivers and streams from Baja Mexico to Alaska
  • The Southern California strain is uniquely adapted to warmer waters and is legally considered a distinct population
  • The steelhead is genetically the same as the rainbow trout, except that it spends much of its life in the ocean. Like salmon, steelhead are born in and spawn in fresh water
  • The Southern California steelhead can grow about 2 feet long and can weigh up to 10 pounds. The population has dwindled to a fraction of its former size as human development has destroyed spawning habitat

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

19/08/2014: Introducing new aqaculture regulations and farming areas in Delaware, USA

Applications for shellfish aquaculture permits are to be accepted this fall by Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, reports Gape Gazette.

Steve Friend of Georgetown has already started getting ready, but “I just want to get it going, to get it started,” he said from his home while standing in front of a stack of 30 cages.
 
http://capegazette.villagesoup.com/p/dnrec-issues-shellfish-aquaculture-regulations/1222739
The hope is that permits for shellfish aquaculture will start to be given by mid to late fall. Here Steve Friend of Georgetown stands next to a few dozen cages he's made in anticipation of receiving a permit.

Though he is frustrated with how long the process has taken, he's is happy the regulations are finally ready.
 

Friend grew up in Lewes and has been raking clams since he was 10. The key to getting the clams, he said, is to tickle them out with the rake and estimates that on a good day, in four hours he can harvest 1800 clams.

He said he's looking forward to aquaculture because it will provide people with an opportunity to know where they're working on a day-to-day basis.

The process to create these regulations began in August 2013 creating a shellfish aquaculture industry in Delaware. The state was the last on the East Coast to adopt legislation establishing an aquaculture industry.


David Saveikis, DNREC Division of Fish and Wildlife director, stressed aquaculture is not a hobby and there are significant start-up costs associated with the new industry. He estimated that the first year could range from $15,000 to $30,000. Friend estimated he's already spent $25,000.

Chris Bason, Center for the Inland Bays executive director, was part of the group that helped the state develop its Shellfish Aquaculture Development Areas or SADAs.

In Rehoboth Bay, 260 acres in three locations have been set aside for aquaculture, representing 4.3 percent of the total bay area. In Indian River Bay, there are 125 acres in two locations, representing 1.36 percent of total bay area. In Little Assawoman Bay, there are 227 acres among four locations that represent 9.3 percent of total bay area.

Bason said the state generally adopted the areas as the team recommended, only slightly modifying some. He said overall, the areas have a low density of native hard clams and little recreational boat traffic.

“They're good, not perfect, but they're never perfect,” he said.
 

Minimum lease acreage is one acre, and the maximum any one applicant can apply for is five acres within Rehoboth and Indian River bays combined. An applicant who leases up to five acres in Rehoboth and/or Indian River bays may also lease an additional one to five acres in Little Assawoman Bay.

Friend said he's going to apply for five acres in Rehoboth and Little Assawoman bays.

The application fee for an aquaculture lease is $300. The annual fee for a lease is $100 an acre for a Delaware resident and $1,000 an acre for a nonresidents.

Initially farmers will be permitted to harvest the Eastern oyster in all three bays and hard clams in Little Assawoman Bay.


For a full list of the new shellfish aquaculture regulations, go to www.dnrec.delaware.gov.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

19/08/2014: EU guidance on CAP compliance for cereals and oilseeds growers

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/345073/cap-reform-august-2014-update.pdfDefra in the UK has released important information on how the new Common Agricultural Policy will be implemented in England, including how the new ‘greening’ requirements will work in practice. Of particular interest to cereal and oilseeds growers will be clarification of the rules around crop diversification and ecological focus areas (EFAs).

 Full details of all changes are in: ‘The new Common Agricultural Policy schemes in England: August 2014 update', those most relevant to cereals and oilseeds growers, along with additional sources of information, are highlighted below.

Crop diversification, also known as the ‘2 or 3 crop rule’ stipulates that if a farmer has 10 or more hectares of arable land, they have to follow crop diversification rules in order to continue receiving the full greening payment.

The crop diversification rules are different for different areas of arable land:

  • Less than 10 ha of arable land: No crop diversification requirements.
  • 10 – 30 ha of arable land: At least 2 different crops on the arable land with the largest crop covering no more than 75% of arable area.
  • More than 30 ha of arable land: At least 3 different crops on the arable land, with the largest crop not covering more than 75% and the two largest crops together not covering more than 95% of the arable area.

For cereal and oilseeds growers, the definition of spring and winter varieties of the same crop is particularly important:
  • For purposes of crop diversification, spring and winter varieties count as separate crops.
  • Growers can use the spring and winter categories from the HGCA Recommended Lists to check compliance with crop diversification rules
  • Spring and winter crops are defined by their classification on the National List not the date they are sown by individual farmers
  • The National List (Plant Varieties and Seeds Gazette) is published by the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) and details all crop varieties which can be legally marketed in the UK, the full National List  is available atwww.fera.defra.gov.uk/plants/publications/gazette.cfm
  • The HGCA Recommended Lists use the information from the National List to define whether a variety is winter or spring
  • Anyone growing varieties not on the HGCA Recommended Lists will need to refer to the National List
  • In the HGCA Recommended Lists, there is a table called ‘Spring wheat (for late autumn sowing)’. This table is to provide agronomic information to growers about varietal performance at different sowing dates. This table in no way defines spring or winter varieties with respect to CAP crop diversification
  • If a crop is not classed as either winter or spring on the National List, it is classed as a spring crop under the greening rules
In relation to Ecological focus areas (EFA), they need to be equivalent to at least 5% of the total arable area for farms with more than 15ha of eligible arable land. Farmers will be able to choose which areas and/or features that can be used to make up their EFA from the following: buffer strips, nitrogen-fixing crops, hedges, fallow land and catch crops and cover crops. 

The latest update of the Defra document provides further information on the definition for each of these features, as well as identifying which crops will be considered as ‘nitrogen-fixing’ under the EFA rules.

Please note that there are some exemptions for both crop diversification and EFA regulations. Refer to the Defra documentfor more information.

All of the information above applies only to England; HGCA is seeking details from the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland about how crop diversification rules will be applied there.
Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

19/08/2014: Cannon-fired salmon


A "salmon cannon" which sucks fish out of water and fires them over barriers such as dams has been developed.




Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

Monday, August 18, 2014

18/08/2014: Future drugs from sea cucumbers

In a recent research report from Yadollah Bahrami et al (Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Flinders University, Adelaide) on the subject of Sea cucumbers being prolific producers of a wide range of bioactive compounds.
 
http://www.mdpi.com/1660-3397/12/8/4439
The Sea Cucumber

This study aimed to purify and characterize one class of compound, the saponins, from the viscera of the Australian sea cucumber Holothuria lessoni. The saponins were obtained by ethanolic extraction of the viscera and enriched by a liquid-liquid partition process and adsorption column chromatography. The conclusion of the report is there is an abundance of novel compounds from this species which holds promise for biotechnological applications.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

18/08/2014: Formulated semi-moist diets of common octopus

In the latest edition of Aquaculture Nutrition Early View (Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue) a research report on effective use of glucose rather than starch in formulated semi-moist diets of common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) is published. 
 
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anu.12152/abstract?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false
Common octopus

One of the world’s most fascinating animals, the Octopus is a cephalopod mollusc of the order Octopoda. Octopuses have two eyes and four pairs of arms and, like other cephalopods, they are bilaterally symmetric.

The development of octopus aquaculture, the farming of octopus, is being driven by strong market demands in the Mediterranean and in South American and Asian countries. Octopus live short lives, growing rapidly and maturing early. They typically reach two or three kilograms (high weights for invertebrates).


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news