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Thursday, August 25, 2016

25/08/2016: Chilean government officially decrees the creation of the Nazca-Desventuradas Marine Park

On Wednesday 24th August the Chilean government officially ordered the creation of the Nazca-Desventuradas Marine Park, which protects San Félix and San Ambrosio islands better known as Desventuradas.

Image: Malcolm Browne
According to a recent article written by Paula Díaz Levi on Oceana.org, it was reported thatWith this action, Chile has the largest marine park in the Americas and has tripled its protected oceanic areas. 

“In times when oceans are hit by the overexploitation of species, pollution and phenomena such as climate change, the protection of these islands means a great step forward for oceans in Chile and the rest of the world”, praised Liesbeth van der Meer, executive director of Oceana Chile.

Under the International Conference Our Ocean, held in Valparaíso in October 2015, President Michelle Bachelet announced the establishment of the Nazca-Desventuradas Marine Park. This new fully protected zone has a surface of 300,035 square kilometers (186,433 square miles) and is designed as a no-take area where fishing and other extractive activities will be banned. With the establishment of the Nazca-Desventuradas Park, Chile will not only have the largest marine park in the Americas, but it will also protect 12 percent of its marine surface area, accounting for a 4.4 percent increase.

   
Behind the proposal to create this marine park is an expedition conducted by National Geographic and Oceana in February 2013, led by a team of renowned national and international scientists who explored for the first time and with leading-edge technology one of the most pristine and wild places in South America. Scientists found a unique ecosystem with no signs of human impact and with an outstanding 90 percent level of endemic species –i.e. that are only found there.

Additionally, there is an abundance of algae forests and fish populations, like large tuna fish, yellow tail amberjacks, and deep water sharks, besides fragile deep-sea corals. An indicator of the exceptional health of these ecosystems are large-sized lobsters, with some individuals extending over more than one meter (3 feet) and weighing up to 8 kilograms (17 pounds).

After the expedition, a scientific report about the biodiversity in the Desventuradas was prepared, jointly with a proposal for the establishment of a large marine park surrounding the islands. This initiative was supported by the community in the Juan Fernández Archipelago.

After today’s publication of the decree, the next step is to prepare a management plan for this protected area, an action that will be accomplished by the National Fisheries and Aquaculture Service (Sernapesca), the Undersecretariat of Fisheries and Aquaculture (Subpesca) and the Ministries of the Environment and National Defense. The institutions in charge of monitoring will be Sernapesca and the Chilean Navy.

“The Nazca-Desventuradas Marine Park is a great step forward to achieve Chile’s commitment under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. It is extremely important to protect ecologically relevant zones in Chile and for other countries to follow suit by establishing more protected areas that can promote the conservation and recovery of oceans and their resources,” finalised Ms van der Meer.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Biomin company profile




BIOMIN are dedicated to finding innovative, trend-setting solutions that empower their customers to master existing and future challenges in animal nutrition– the natural way. The application of their scientific know-how and expertise, based on an in-depth understanding of their customer’s needs and concerns, enables them to deliver solutions that support animal health, optimise performance and production efficiency.

Research and development is one of the cornerstones of BIOMIN. Their strong in-house research and development, and global cooperation with leading institutions and organisations form the basis by which innovative solutions are developed for their customers.

Through joint projects with renowned universities and research institutes, BIOMIN is constantly in touch with the latest scientific know-how, from which novel feed additives are developed and produced. Their global network of collaborating institutions has grown to over 100.

One of the cornerstones of BIOMIN’s success is the ongoing improvement of their inhouse quality standards. In 1997, BIOMIN introduced the international ISO 9001 standard. The HACCP system, introduced subsequently at BIOMIN’s production sites, provides the quality assurance our customers seek from them. In addition, the feed quality standards QS and GMP+ guarantee the utmost degree of control and quality for their products – from raw material inputs right through to the final product.

Concerns over climate change and the role of greenhouse gases continue to rise. In September 2011, BIOMIN was internationally recognised through the award of ISO 14040 ‘Life Cycle Assessment’ certification. By optimising feed use and improving animal performance, it is possible to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from livestock operations.
Through innovative production technologies and advanced, scientific know-how, BIOMIN has pioneered several trend-setting solutions for a range of animal nutrition products, all of which utilise fully natural processes and ingredients.

An in-depth understanding of what the customer’s needs and concerns are has enabled BIOMIN to create and deliver solutions in-line with performance and efficiency goals.
Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

25/08/2016: Remote controlled cleaning rig - FNC8

The Flying Net Cleaner 8 (FNC8) is an easy operated powerful, remote controlled net cleaner. It can be mobile controlled as well as controlled from the control room. The movements are unique, as it “swims” along the net in the cage, and cleaning with high-pressure seawater.

The lack of physical contact between the net cleaner and the net ensures no damages or tears to the net, thus reducing risk of fish escaping. The FNC8 is a patent applied principle, ensuring that the rig is in balance whether it cleans horizontally, vertically or upside down. This quality simplifies choice of suitable cleaning direction for any net type.
  

www.akvagroup.com

Cleaning speed is important for the operator, and FNC8 is able to clean at an incredibly fast and efficient rate – saving both time and reducing costs. Flying Net Cleaner 8 standardly includes ROV components that are easy to clean and disinfect.

It is a user-friendly device with built-in auto functions, sensors surveying the cleaning process, and advanced camera systems. The new Flying Net Cleaner 8 is prepared for collecting rinsed off organisms.

Twice as fast as the current systems
The FNC8 has a cleaning capacity, which is twice as fast as the current systems with minimal spread of dispose (ready for collecting) and surveillance sensors for improved pressure during the cleaning process.

The FNC8 also features thrusters, which are used not only for propulsion but for placing the cleaner close to the net without sharp wheels or belts. The FNC8 also boasts Rugged component and solid and open construction; making it easy to maintain and disinfect.

The FNC8 is controlled by pilot console and joystick, and the control unit (Top Side) are compatible with ROV solutions for net repairing, camera inspection, manipulator and rock drills HD cameras and monitor; with the FNC8 Standardly delivered with two HD cameras and two LED lights as standard, although the FNC8 is capable of accommodating four of each if purchasers wish to upgrade.

Data is graphically presented with overlay with a transponder connection to the “Advanced Control” navigation system; which is easy to operate with auto functions (prepared for autonomy operations).


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

25/08/2016: Register for Sustainable Ocean Summit 2016 Rotterdam

Register now for the 2016 WOC Sustainable Ocean Summit(SOS), Rotterdam, 30 Nov - 2 Dec, the only international ocean business event to provide a synthesis of global status and trends in ocean economic activity and progress in Corporate Ocean Responsibility.

With the theme of “Ocean 2030: Sustainable Development Goals and the Ocean Business Community,” SOS 2016 will gather ocean industry leaders to review ocean economic projections for the coming 15 years and develop industry-driven solutions to ocean sustainable development challenges.

www.ilago.ovh/sustainableoceansummit
Ensure you have a place at this unique gathering of the global ocean business community by registering early for SOS 2016.


To register, click HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Jefo company profile

  


Jefo is a world leader in the field of non-medicated performance feed additives for the poultry, swine, ruminant and aquaculture sectors. Founded in Canada in 1982, today Jefo has offices on 5 continents, and specialises in the design, manufacturing, warehousing and JIT-distribution of an array of animal nutrition specialty products.

Jefo is a pioneer in the green revolution taking place in animal nutrition.

"Our commitment is to providing effective alternatives for optimal performances in animal nutrition".

The Europe / Africa division of Jefo was created in 1998 and is headquartered in Nantes, France. We market a line of original products including vitamins, enzymes, organic acids and essential oils.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/08/2016: UV technology in aquaculture

by Michael Annett, Sales/Business Manager UV Systems, Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems

When designed, installed and maintained properly, UV systems are extremely robust, reliable and effective. Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems (PAES) is a leading manufacturer of UV water treatment systems for use in a range of industries.

PAES has particular expertise in designing and supporting UV systems in aquaculture field applications. In addition to new installations, PAES also provides consulting and support for UV systems that are installed in existing aquaculture facilities.
  

Enclosed UV Reactors

UV treatment has been used successfully for approximately six decades to treat and sanitise water in many critical applications. In this article, we will describe the array of UV system configurations along with their associated lamp technologies, to serve as a high-level guide to important design and operating considerations for UV systems.

UV process discussion Ultraviolet or UV energy is located in the electromagnetic spectrum with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light and longer than x-rays. When UV systems are deployed to treat water, the reactions are instantaneous, taking only a few seconds to occur, without the creation of disinfection by-products. Chemicals are not required and the associated hazards of chemical handling and storage are not present.

UV treatment does not alter colour, odour, taste or pH. As such, UV processes are environmentally safe and are considered ecologically-responsible technology. The science behind UV technology is well-established; and its efficacy is well-proven. UV systems are trusted in a wide range of industries including drinking water production, aquaculture farming and other applications.

UV light is comprised of electromagnetic radiation of wavelengths ranging from 100nm to 400nm:

•             UV-A (long wave UV): 315-400nm
•             UV-B (middle wave UV): 280-315nm
•             UV-C (short wave UV): 200-280nm
•             Vacuum UV: 100-200nm

Disinfection
When a UV system is used to treat water, UV light at the 254nm wavelength penetrates the cell wall of microorganisms that are present in the treatment water. The amount of UV delivered to the organism is called the dose. The UV energy permanently alters the DNA structure of the microorganism in a process called thymine dimerisation.

The microorganism is not destroyed, rather it is ‘inactivated’ and rendered unable to reproduce or infect.


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/08/2016: Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council puts limits on forage fish species

Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, which oversees fishing in U.S. waters from New York State to North Carolina has decided to begin managing more than 50 species of forage fish. 

In a recent article written by Annie Sneed on the ScientificAmerican, it was reported that many of these “forage” species we have never heard of, let alone tasted them, but they play a vitally important role in the ocean, they are eaten by the fish we eat.

The council’s decision is a bit unusual—after all, none of the forage fish populations are in danger of collapse, and only one of the 50-plus species is harvested on a large scale in the mid-Atlantic today. In the region, people have mostly ignored these fish because they tend to be small, low-value and not very appetizing. But the council is trying to handle its fisheries more holistically because it has realized that putting controls on a single species at a time just will not work.
  
Image: Ingrid Taylar

“There's a move now to manage all fisheries as part of a bigger system,” says Steve Ross, a research professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington who is one of the council’s scientific advisors. “When you manage one fish, you try to manage its whole environment—and that includes the food web.” 


These small, nutrient-rich forage fish pump energy through the ecosystem in a way that no other marine animal can. They feed on the bottom of the food chain—on single-celled plankton, which larger fish cannot eat—and then they become prey for all sorts of upper-level predators like tuna, sea bass and halibut as well as seabirds and marine mammals.

“I like to say that forage fish help turn sunlight into salmon,” explains Ellen Pikitch, a professor of marine biology at Stony Brook University. “They support so much of the ocean ecosystem.”

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news