Tuesday, July 17, 2018

18/07/2018: Shrimp, the adaptive swimming crustacean

by Vaughn Entwistle, International Aquafeed

Shrimp are a variety of swimming crustacean that are widespread and abundant thanks to their ability to adapt to all nearly all forms of marine environment.

While marine shrimp are typically found near coasts and estuaries, freshwater breeds can be found in many of the worlds' rivers, lakes and ponds. Shrimp are an essential part of the marine food chain and are consumed by larger animals ranging from fish to whales. They have long been sought after for human consumption, especially in countries and cultures that rely upon seafood for a large part of their diet.
 

Not surprisingly, shrimp were one of the first aquatic species to be intensively farmed and now farmed shrimp account for 55 percent of the shrimp produced globally. About 75 percent of the world’s farmed shrimp are produced in Asia, principally in China followed by Thailand, Indonesia, India, and Vietnam. The other 25 percent is produced in Latin American countries, such as Brazil, Mexico and Ecuador.

Shrimp farming is also rapidly growing in many developing countries, such as Bangladesh. Shrimp farming is starting to catch on in the United States, mostly in the southern states (Texas and Florida) that enjoy the kind of warmer climate necessary for shrimp. Here, shrimp are typically raised in earthen ponds similar to those used to raise catfish.

While there are thousands of species of shrimp worldwide, only a small number of these species are commercially significant. All farmed freshwater prawns today belong to the genus Macrobrachium. Until 2000, the only species farmed was the giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii, also known as the Malaysian prawn).

Since then, China has begun farming the Oriental river prawn (M. nipponense) in large quantities, while India farms a small amount of monsoon river prawn (M. malcolmsonii). In 2003, these three species accounted for all farmed freshwater prawns, about two-thirds M. rosenbergii and one-third M. nipponense. One of the most popular species is the Macrobrachium rosenbergii, the Giant Malaysian Prawn, which is a freshwater prawn, native of South Asia.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Yemmak company profile





Established in 1965, Yemmak is a Turkish feed machinery manufacturer, providing industrial process solutions for the animal waste processing, chemical and biomass industries.

Through its deep industry experience spanning over half a century, Yemmak exports to 35 countries on four continents, and provides services in project consulting and engineering, special-purpose projects, automation, modernisation, steel construction and after-sales support with a 250-strong staff lead specialist engineers at its 50,000m2 area plant in Bandırma, Turkey.

Yemmak is among the few producers in Turkey and Europe that can manage machinery, process and turnkey projects from a single centre.

Yemmak recognises the key role of advanced technology in improving Turkey's prospects and believes R&D investments are crucial in this regard.

As a global brand, Yemmak exports 70 percent of its products to 35 countries including Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Israel, Lebanon and the rest of the Middle East; Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and all other Turkish republics; and Russia, Ukraine, Armenia, Sweden and Panama. Providing low energy costs, the design, production, and assembly operations of the company are of high quality, selection, reliability, and efficiency.

Yemmak sees each project as a complete system, and identifies for its customers the most optimal solutions. With the mission of transforming factories into manufacturers that turn out products with high marginal utility, Yemmak has set up numerous of the highest capacity factories, producing feed for poultry, cattle and fish. It is currently establishing the largest turkey feed factory in Russia.

Yemmak's primary product groups consist of:
- Raw material intake and cleaning units
- Storage solutions for solid and liquid raw materials
- Grinders Mixer systems
- Blending units
- Pelletising technologies
- Weighing and bagging machinery
- Transport equipment
- Electrical power panels and control panels
- Automation systems

Yemmak reshapes production through environmentally friendly, sustainable and innovative technologies.

Visit the Yemmak website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Monday, July 16, 2018

17/07/2018: Seafood industry veteran Mark Prater joins Australis Aquaculture sales team

Australis Aquaculture is pleased to announce and welcome Mark Prater as Director of Sales. In this role Mr Prater will be responsible for developing new business opportunities and managing key foodservice and retail accounts from his Southern California base.

“Mark has worked with Australis for many years as an independent sales representative and we are thrilled to have him bring his deep knowledge of Australis and the seafood industry to us on a full-time basis,” says Australis VP of Sales, Bill Shea.
 
Mark Prater
Image credit: 
Buzz Orr 

Mr Prater is a well-known figure in the seafood industry with over 30 years of experience. He spent the last nine years running Mariners Pacific Seafood, which serves as a regional retained sales agent for numerous organisations, including International Pacific Seafoods, Regal Springs Tilapia, Bonamar Seafood, Villa Seafood and Certi-Fresh Foods. Australis was among his first clients. 

Read the full article on the International Aquafeed website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

17/07/2018: Turning fuel into food, rather than food into fuel

by Unibio, Denmark

The world needs sustainable solutions to overcome the food challenges of the 21st century.

Therefore, we do need to figure out how we can feed the growing world population when agriculture land per capita is decreasing and how we can produce more protein in a sustainable way without polluting our planet.
 

Unibio is a Danish biotech company founded in 2001. Its main focus is to supply solutions to the challenge of protein scarcity in an eco-friendly way while addressing the environmental issues of overfishing, deforestation, use of pesticides and fertilisers, exhaustion of farm lands and water resources. Unibio has unique competencies within fermentation technologies allowing a highly scalable production of protein with the use of methanotroph bacteria. Methane is converted into the highly concentrated bacterial protein meal, Uniprotein, in an environmentally friendly manner with a minimum use of energy and water.

Since the foundation, Unibio’s goal has been to provide the world with innovative sustainable solutions to meet the challenges of a growing global population and sustained growth in living standards, which have increased the global demand for fish and meat for human consumption. With the use of Unibio’s biotechnological innovations the company is able to decouple protein production from the fluctuating and limited agricultural sector and the volatile fishing industries.

Thus, a change in the protein value chain occurs where proteins can be produced by the bioindustry as feed for animals, and cropland can be used to produce food for humans instead of feed for animals.


Read the full article, HERE.

Visit the Unibio website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Van Aarsen company profile



Van Aarsen has become a household name worldwide for machinery and turnkey projects for animal feed technology, both for commercial feed producers and for vertically-integrated businesses. 

Quality is of the utmost importance in both sectors of the industry and innovations in feed production are therefore of great interest. 

Thanks to their extensive experience, engineers and technicians are always able to offer tailor-made solutions.

Visit the Van Aarsen website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Sunday, July 15, 2018

16/07/2018: Wageningen University and Nutriad present results on butyrate research

Feed additive producer Nutriad, a pioneer in sodium butyrate applications for the animal feed industry, co-financed a research project on the use of butyrate as feed additive. 

The multi-year research project was concluded with the Ph.D. thesis of Pierre Moquet on the effects of butyrate in broiler diets, which he successfully defended on June 22nd at Wageningen University (Netherlands). 
 
Image credit: Nutriad
Dr Moquet started his Ph.D.-research in the Wageningen Animal Nutrition Group (WUR) to investigate an important conundrum related to the use of butyrate as an additive in animal feed: on one hand, this molecule has received considerable attention for its potential to improve intestinal health and animal performance, while on the other hand, the mechanisms underlying these effects have been described as very diverse and seemingly less consistent.

Read the full article on the International Aquafeed website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

16/07/2018: Commercially available methionine sources and its implications on aquaculture feeds

by Dr Alexandros Samartzis Senior Technical Service Manager, Evonik

All living organisms, including fish and crustaceans, do not require protein per se, but amino acids (AA), the building blocks of proteins.

All AA structurally contain three common parts: a central carbon bond to a hydrogen, a nitrogen containing amino group and a carboxylic group. Proteins, consisted of few up to thousands of AA, having numerous structural and metabolic functions. In animal production, the most direct result of AA deficiencies translates to reduced growth. Traditionally, it was the economic incentive, which resulted in the use of supplemental AA in diet formulation. However, there has been a gradual evolution with more emphasis directed towards sustainability and total nutrient supply.
 

In aquaculture feed formulations, Methionine (Met) is usually the first limiting essential amino acid (EAA) especially in low fish meal (FM) diets. It is therefore, required to include a supplemental source of Met in order to meet the feeds’ specification, targeting the animal’s requirement for this particular EAA. While evaluating supplemental nutrients or additives for use in feed formulation, three parameters needs to be considered: (i) nutritional value (biological effectiveness) of the supplemental nutrient, (ii) stability, homogeneity etc. during the feed production process and (iii) physical properties of the nutrient source during feeding practice.

There are several commercially available Met sources in the market like DL-Met (DL-Methionine for Aquaculture), DL-Methionyl-DL-Methionine (AQUAVI® Met-Met), L-Met (L-Methionine), Methionine Hydroxy Analogue-free acid (MHA-FA or liquid MHA) and Methionine Hydroxy Analogue calcium salt (MHA-Ca). Both terrestrial and aquatic animals can utilise crystalline AA such as Methionine; however, the biological availability of the different methionine sources differs greatly. The differences in biological availability are a reflection of differences in product matrix, digestibility, transport mechanism and metabolic conversion requirements.

DL-Met, as well as the dipeptide DL-Methionyl-DL-Methionine (Met-Met), are the racemic mixture of D- and L-isomer of Methionine and are commercially available as feed additive, with 99 percent DL-Met and 95 percent Met-Met (95 percent DL-Methionyl-DL-Methionine and two percent DL-Met) purity, respectively. As only the L-isomer can be utilized for the protein synthesis by the animals’ body, D-isomer is metabolically converted to L-isomer first through oxidation to keto-Methionine by the enzyme D-amino oxidase and then transaminated by transaminase enzyme to L-Met. The enzymes required in the conversion of D-form to L-form are not at a rate-limiting factor in fish and shrimp alike poultry and swine.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news



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