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Thursday, February 23, 2017

Ferraz Machinery and Engineering Ltda company profile



Based in the city of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo state, Brazil, on the Via Ananhguera, one of the main highways of the country, Ferraz now occupies premises of approximately 13,000 m2, built on a land area of 32,000 m2.

All the products that the company sells are manufactured entirely on the premises of Ferraz by the most qualified professionals in the areas of machining, boilers, bodyshop, welding, lasers, shipping, services and spares.


Ferraz projects are in accordance with the standards of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) required by the Ministry of Agriculture, and bear the ANFAL quality seal PIQ-PET (National Association of Balanced Food Manufacturers).


According to their website, "We design and install complete lines for animal feed production processes - for branny, pelleting and extruded feeds. From start to finish of every factory installation project, we present and follow all the steps of its construction. We also provide aftercare, always bringing innovations and improvements to equipment as well as effective and constant technical assistance."

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/02/2017: Aquaculture without Frontiers, the appointed solicitor trustee

by Simon Birks

As a 16 year old student reading law at “A” Level, I was sure that Law was the vocation from which I would gain the most satisfaction and pleasure

I did not however appreciate just how much this vocation would afford the chance to meet so many kind, generous and benevolent individuals.

 
Simon Birks
Turn the clocks forward by more years than I care to mention and now I find myself and our law practice working with many business owners who, as well as their day to day business operations, wish to use their positions, success and contacts to create long-term legacies that have as their foundation, the purpose of making lives better for those less fortunate than themselves.

Prior to accepting this role I have been fortunate enough to be offered the opportunity to join a trustee board on more than one occasion, particularly in relation to charities that I have assisted in the formation of.

On each occasion, I have been incredibly humbled by the invites and simply overwhelmed by the dedication of those who would be my fellow trustees. However I declined each of these as I felt that I could add little to the board other than my legal and regulatory experience.

Accepting the Role
So why now accept the role of ‘Solicitor Trustee for Aquaculture without Frontiers Charitable Incorporated Organisation (CIO)’?

The answer is embedded in two of my fellow trustees; Roger Gilbert and Tuti Tan.

It was their passion to use Aquaculture and the amazing opportunities it brings, to change the lives of those in developing and transition countries.

With the position and AwF, I feel there is scope to make a real difference, and I am convinced that whether great or small, AwF will undoubtedly result in saving lives.

Objectives of AwF Roger and Tuti explained the history of AwF, the former charity that existed in the UK prior to its handover to AwF USA and how they would dearly like to resume the work of AwF in the UK.

That was the start of project-renaissance that would ultimately lead to AwF UK (CIO) being ‘reformed’ in February 2016. As part of that process, the Trustees were required to state what the ‘Objects’ of the CIO would be.

We decided that this should not be overly complex and therefore we agreed that the object should be “To Promote Sustainable Aquaculture Development for the benefit of the public by the relief of poverty and the improvement of the conditions of life in developing and Transition Countries”.

We also took the opportunity to clarify that Sustainable Aquaculture Development is the “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” and Aquaculture, under the CIO objects is “the farming or aquatic organisms including fish, molluscs, crustaceans and aquatic plants”.

Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/02/2017: GAA supports responsible pangasius producers

The pangasius industry finds itself in the media spotlight, and the Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) wishes to take the opportunity to set the record straight on a number of issues

Pangasius can be produced responsibly and to rigorous food-safety standards and therefore can be purchased with confidence on these grounds.

Pangasius producers certified to Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) standards are subject to rigorous food-safety inspection and environmental production controls.

 
Image: Raita Futo
These producers have invested in their businesses to meet these requirements and should be respected for their leadership in doing so.

There have been anti-pangasius campaigns, often promoted by competing seafood interests and spread on social media, that can easily misrepresent the realities.

However, the claims made in these campaigns have been successfully challenged by scientific studies and published science literature, including Murk et al. (2016), Huysvedt et al. (2013), Little et al. (2012) and Anh et al. (2010).

The co-author of one of these papers, Simon Bush, professor of environmental policy at Wageningen University, responded to recent developments by saying, “Pangasius has been the subject of food scares and environmental scares, but on closer inspection the claims lack substance. Our analysis shows that the vigorous claims made about pangasius do not match the very limited safety risk and limited environmental impact observed in scientific studies. In reality, pangasius, a relatively new product in Western markets, has found an important niche in retail and foodservice outlets and is perhaps a victim of its own success.”

Another scientist, who has studied the life cycle impacts of pangasius, has also leapt to the fish’s defense.

Ghent University Professor Emeritus Patrick Sorgeloos said that pangasius is healthy. He told VTM news, “In the media, the fish has wrongly been given a bad image. Research of Dutch scientists has showed that the contribution of the pangasius industry to pollution in the Mekong River is negligible.”

Professor Sorgeloos also went on to challenge the notion that pangasius undermines the market for seafood.

“When pangasius made its entrance in Europe, the local fishing industry was afraid of cheap farmed fish from Asia, as they thought that consumers would buy less fish from local sources,” he said.

“This proved to be wrong. Pangasius is an ideal fish to start with and is very popular among families with children: It is odorless (no smell in the kitchen upon preparation), has no distinct fishy taste and few bones. The fish lowers the threshold for fish consumption, and at a later age the same children will be interested to expand their range of fish.”

Responding to claims of negative environmental impacts, GAA’s BAP Coordinator Dan Lee said, “Any fish species, whether in a natural or a farm setting, will interact with its environment. Pangasius is no exception and the interactions arising from production systems in Southeast Asia do have the potential to generate localised negative impacts. For this very reason, organisations such as the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) and BAP have established production and environmental standards for farmed fish to recognise those producers who mitigate against those potential negative impacts. The standards specify the controls that need to be applied to contain the risks of biodiversity impacts, wildlife interactions, pollution and the indirect impacts associated with providing marine ingredients for feeds.”

Additionally, the standards developed by GAA and ASC set controls on the use of chemicals and antibiotics to prevent any risks to the health of either the environment or the consumer.

The standards have been developed following extensive stakeholder and public consultation including retailers and conservation NGOs.

To verify compliance with BAP and ASC standards, independent certification bodies conduct annual inspections, with teams of trained auditors that have specialist knowledge of aquaculture and its potential impacts.

Given the combined forces of science-based standards and rigorous, independent auditing, it is clear that certified pangasius is a responsible sourcing choice.

As an industry, our focus can move on from questioning the environmental credentials of this product and instead be concentrating on how collaboratively we can engage to ensure the correct message is received and accepted by consumers.

GAA featured such a message at the last GOAL conference in Guangzhou, China, with a video produced by Wageningen University.

To view the Pangasius video, click HERE


For references and to read the original press release, click HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

24/02/2017: SONGA now capable of offering four-star BAP shrimp

Congratulations to Ecuador’s SONGA (Sociedad Nacional de Galapagos C.A.), which is now eligible to offer four-star Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) shrimp, only the second company in Ecuador capable of doing so, the Global Aquaculture Alliance announced in late February

Four star is the highest designation in the BAP third-party certification program, signifying that a product originates from a BAP-certified feed mill, hatchery, farm and processing plant.

 
Image: Cooking etc.
SONGA’s shrimp processing plant, two of its farms (Lebama Farm and Naturisa Farm) and its hatchery (Macrobio Hatchery) recently attained BAP certification.

The company sources its feed from GISIS and IMPROSA feed mills in Ecuador, both of which are BAP-certified.

SONGA is one of the top four white shrimp producers in Ecuador. In 2015 and 2016, SONGA was the number one Ecuadorian exporter to mainland China, South Korea and the United States.

The company is well known and reliable in the global markets due to its prime quality, consistency and fair weights.

“The efforts of SONGA to differentiate itself by achieving the maximum level of third-party certification truly represent its responsible aquaculture practices. SONGA is one of the leading companies in a leading country committed to environmental and social responsibility. We appreciate very much SONGA´s support,” said Marcos Moya, manager of BAP Supply Development.

BAP is the world’s most comprehensive third-party certification program, with standards encompassing environmental responsibility, social responsibility, food safety, animal health and welfare and traceability.

Currently, there are 29 BAP-certified processing plants, farms, hatcheries and feed mills in Ecuador. Worldwide, there are more than 1,600 BAP-certified facilities.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Andritz company profile


ANDRITZ is a globally leading supplier of plants, equipment, and services for hydropower stations, the pulp and paper industry, the metalworking and steel industries, and for solid/liquid separation in the municipal and industrial sectors.

The publicly listed technology Group is headquartered in Graz, Austria, and has a staff of almost 25,000 employees. ANDRITZ operates over 250 sites worldwide.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

23/02/2017: Diana Aqua marks a new milestone in its sustainable development program

Diana Aqua was recently awarded the IFFO Global Standard for Responsible Supply, Chain of Custody (IFFO RS CoC) certification

This award fully supports Diana Aqua’s ambitions to become a leader for sustainable functional marine ingredients for the aquafeed and aquaculture sector.
 

www.aquativ-diana.com

A new milestone in Diana Aqua sustainable development based on a solid and long term partnership with TC UNION AGROTECH (IFFO RS)
Since 2010, Diana Aqua and TC Union Agrotech, a Thaï leader in producing and supply aqua-industrial by products, have joined forces in a long standing partnership with the common mission to valorise co-products into performing solutions.

Thanks to unique know-how and scientific expertise, Diana Aqua has developed a leading position to deliver traceable, responsibly sourced and standardised marine ingredients with high functional value to aqua feed and aquaculture industry players.

On January 10th 2017, Diana Aqua Thai subsidiary (SPF Diana Thailand), was awarded of the IFFO Global Standard for Responsible Supply, Chain of Custody (IFFO RS CoC) certification.

This certification recognises the full commitment of Diana Aqua of providing its partners and customers with responsibly sourced raw materials, pure and safe marine ingredients with full traceability back to their source.

It also reinforces it’s positioning as sustainable reference partner in functional marine ingredients for the aqua feed and aquaculture sector based on responsibly managed factories and supply-chains.

According to Paul Seguin, Asia Sales Director, “This certification marks our global and local commitment towards delivering trust to our customers and supporting their brands on the aqua feed markets. The pressure on natural marine resources has become an imperative for all players of the value chain. Our role is to find disruptive sustainable business models to keep on serving the growing industry of aquaculture without compromising the quality and the nutritional and healthy benefits of our products”. 


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

23/02/2017: Federal government declares fishery disaster for low Pink Salmon harvest in gulf of Alaska

Governor Bill Walker and Lt. Governor Byron Mallott welcomed news that the US Department of Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker accepted the state’s request for a disaster declaration on pink salmon harvests in the Gulf of Alaska last week

In accordance with Section 312 (a) of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Management and Conservation Act (MSA), the State of Alaska requested the federal government declare a fishery disaster for poor pink salmon runs across the Gulf region in 2016.

 
Image: USDA Forest Service Alaska Service
“The impacts of low pink salmon runs are being felt across the entire Gulf of Alaska,” said Governor Bill Walker.

“In addition to commercial fishermen and fish processors, those who sell fuel, tackle, supplies, groceries, and lodging are also struggling from the poor season. Local governments will also feel the burden on their economic base. We are pleased with this news from the US Department of Commerce, and we will work with the federal government going forward to address this issue. I thank all the legislators who tirelessly advocated for this declaration, especially Representative Louise Stutes for making the first request.”

Low pink salmon runs across the Gulf of Alaska led to a significant drop in 2016 harvest numbers. This declaration provides Congress with a basis to appropriate disaster relief funding for economic assistance to affected communities.

Should Congress appropriate relief funds, the State of Alaska would be required to match 25 percent of the amount authorised.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news