Monday, July 28, 2014

28/07/2014: Global aquaculture market to expand dramatically

The global market for aquaculture is expected to reach US$202.96 billion by 2020, according to a new study by Grand View Research, Inc. 

Aquaculture includes farming of aquatic organisms such as mollusks, fish, crustaceans and other aquatic flora and fauna. 

Increasing consumer awareness of health benefits associated with seafood and growing consumption serves as a key driver for development of the market. 

In addition, the market demand is expected to be further fuelled by the lack of naturally available varieties owing to extensive fishing. Rice-fish culture is expected to serve as key growth opportunity for this market over the next six years.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

28/07/2014: An 'octopus' robot for the depths

For years, roboticists have yearned to develop a flexible machine that can explore tight spaces, repair dangerous equipment and potentially even conform to the human body. 
 
PoseiDrone's soft arms can help it to navigate rocky, uneven surfaces. The robot can also propel itself by expelling water from its flexible body. Credit M. Brega/The Age of Robots

That is being achieved in  a small seaside laboratory, where researchers have been tinkering away on a prototype of a multi-armed robot they call PoseiDrone for the sea god Poseidon.

It's an octopus, because octopuses can swim, crawl and manipulate objects, they make “the ideal underwater robot,” said Francesco Giorgio-Serchi, a scientist at the Research Center on Sea Technologies and Marine Robotics in Livorno, Italy, who is working on the project. 

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

28/07/2014: Webcam catches baby sea turtles hatching

Baby loggerhead sea turtles hatched from their eggs and began their march to the sea on Friday night, July 25, around 21:00.

Using infrared lighting, a live-streaming, high-definition turtle webcam – positioned on a beach in the Florida Keys – recorded the hatch and march to the sea of about 100 baby loggerhead sea turtles.



See more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

28/07/2014: An Aquafeed interview with Onur Emre Solak of Pharmaq of Turkey

Onur Emre Solak is the Country Manager of Pharmaq in Turkey. Pharmaq are best known as one of the biggest fish health and vaccine solution providers and is best known as one of the biggest fish health and vaccine solution providers. 

It provides environmentally sound, safe and efficacious health products to the global aquaculture industry through targeted research.

Pharmaq’s vaccines are manufactured in a state-of-the-art production facility in Overhalla, Norway. Administration and Research and Development activities are based in Oslo, Norway. With subsidiaries in Chile, United Kingdom, Vietnam and Turkey, Pharmaq has around 165 employees. Our products are marketed in Europe, North and South America and Asia through an extensive network of distributors and wholesalers. 

When did you begin with Pharmaq and when did Pharmaq begin in Turkish aquaculture?

I have been with Pharmaq since 2011’s establishment of the company. Pharmaq achieved its first license to operate in Turkey in November 2013 and then brought the first product of Alpha Ject 2000 to the Turkish market in January 2013. Since December 2013 another product came to market and we are working on others also. I work closely with Donald Campbell, Sales and Business Manager for the Mediterranean region and Norwegian colleagues as well.

Which regions do you serve, and how much of the market do you serve?

For the marine species , 30 percent of our customers are in the Izmir region and 70 percent are in the Bodrum region in Turkey. From June to November, we call it the ‘vaccination season’ and so we travel and meet with customers all around the region.
How does the operation work in Turkey? What species are most common to vaccinate?
Seabass, seabream and trout are the main species. The operations are well-rounded in that these are quality products for farmers, along with education, guidance and follow up visits from Turkish staff. 


However, there are several farms in Iran located along one river which we count as our customers. We are trying to improve the bio-security problems learnt in Chile and its sea-lice problems and prevent them from taking place here.
 

Where is Turkey compared to Europe on aquaculture disease management? What are the current challenges?

 The general trend in Turkey has been of developing resistance to health problems and this is now done through vaccination rounds. Comparing Turkey with Norway shows that Turkey is at the early 1990s stage with the use of antibiotics compared to vaccinations. The general trend has been to use antibiotics in the past. A proactive approach has been taken in Turkey to prevent diseases. As antibiotics are phased out and replaced by vaccination the level of disease is expected to drop dramatically in future.

What after-sales support does Pharmaq offer? 

Pharmaq visits customers on their fish farms for follow-up support of all kinds. Both local and the Norwegian Pharmaq personnel visit regularly to develop the products for the regional challenges. 

In simple terms, what is the overall plan for Pharmaq’s development in Turkey? 

We will build to a point where our Mediterranean team acts as a hub for the region through Turkey for the Turkish Republics and the Middle East. 

How is Turkish aquaculture working with European, middle Eastern or Asian fish farmers from your point-of-view in the development of health in fish? And where is assistance mainly coming from for the growing Turkish fish farming market - is it through know-how, academic research, training and education, investments, technology and equipment?

Currently, there is not much of a serious study for fish health in Turkey, but since our market is global most of the farm investments are importing all kind of technology from the pioneer countries in aquaculture.

For health management, we are doing the best we can by following up new diseases and current situations. We are also working in a close relationship with authorities and some universities but I can say that academically Turkey still has some miles to cover in disease management, especially with regard to bio-security at farms.


Off-shore fish farming was a good step taken also for the health management combined with other necessities such as water flow and depth. Turkey does not have separate guidelines for fish health other than for farmed animals. But considering the new regulations launched by the Ministry of Agriculture, such as pharmaq-vigilance, we believe soon we will have a upper-scale system for monitoring and controlling aquaculture health system nationwide.


Friday, July 25, 2014

25/07/2014: Great white spotted

Passengers and crew aboard a whale watching boat saw a Great White Shark near St. Andrews, New Brunswick, Canada.

http://www.thevanguard.ca/News/Local/2014-07-23/article-3810906/Great-White-Shark-sighting-on-NB-side-of-Bay-of-Fundy/1
A picture is worth 1000 words - the sight of a large Great White

The Quoddy Link Marine was just outside St. Andrews harbour and heading for the islands in Passamaquoddy Bay to view whales and other marine life for their afternoon sailing earlier this week, reports 

Just five or 10 minutes outside of the harbour, crew member and naturalist Nick Hawkins, who was on the upper deck, saw something thrashing in the water behind the boat.
 

“We saw the dorsal and tail fin come out of the water and that’s a sure sign it’s a shark,” he said. “We don’t normally turn around for sharks because typically you see them once and then they’re gone.”

Hawkins says the size of the fish, however, made them turn around and they were able to come up behind it as it swam along near the surface. In all, they watched the shark for 15 minutes.


“It was amazing,” he said. “It shakes you up a bit. It’s amazing the things you can see in your own backyard that people don’t really know are there.”
Hawkins assumes the shark was hunting a seal or porpoise when they first saw it as it was thrashing and doubling back and forth.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

25/07/2014: The next Tuna you eat could have a mackerel momma

A marine scientist plans to use mackerel as surrogate parents for Pacific bluefin tuna!

If you're not worried about a future without toro sushi or rare tuna steaks, you probably should be, report Popular Science


Five of the eight species of this tasty marine predator are endangered, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, source of the Red List of threatened species. In January 2013 an international group of fisheries researchers told the world (PDF) that Pacific bluefin tuna had been fished to their lowest levels in history, with the population near to collapsing as a commercial stock.

This is a problem for natural ecosystems as well as for people who like to eat tuna (it is among the world's most important commercial fish), and marine biologist Goro Yoshizaki is looking for a way around it. 


Nikkei Asian Review reports that the Tokyo University-based scientist is working to implant germ cells from young tuna into mackerel, and then use the mackerel to breed tuna:
  • To produce tuna using mackerel, reproductive cells are removed from tuna and transplanted into mackerel. Male mackerel possessing tuna sperm then fertilize tuna eggs held by female mackerel. Yoshizaki's study is now at the stage where he has selected the type of mackerel suitable for producing tuna. He said he aims to finish developing the technology in five years and commercialize it in 10 years.

Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news

25/07/2014: Loosening the constraints of red tape down-under

New aquaculture 'development areas' could be set up in central and northern Queensland if a report by the state's competition authority is adopted, reports ABC Rural.

The draft report recommends reforming regulation in the Aus$80 million industry to better reach its potential and attract more investment.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-23/queensland-aquaculture-report/5617596

But prawn farmers say there's still a lot of work to be done.


For the past 10 years, tight regulations and environmental concerns have stifled Queensland’s aquaculture industry.
 

But the State Government has asked the Queensland Competition Authority to investigate reforms to help boost investment. The QCA has recommended offering investors more certainty by earmarking development areas for land-based aquaculture spanning 450 hectares.
 

Each would have its own government-developed regulatory code. That would require all three levels of government to work together to streamline red tape, which Queensland Agriculture Minister John McVeigh says his government is prepared to do.

"It's in line with our overall objective of reducing regulation in agriculture in general. We've been focused on that from a planning perspective already."



Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquacutlure-news