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Friday, December 9, 2016

09/12/2016: $950,000 boost for Southland aquaculture, New Zealand

New Zealand Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy today announced $950,000 (NZD) in government support for Southland’s aquaculture industry.

Aquaculture is a key focus of the Southland Regional Development Strategy Action Plan, which aims to diversify Southland’s economy, grow the population and strengthen local business.

 
Image: Tony Foster
“Southland’s climate and ocean conditions lend themselves to sustainable and efficient production of high quality seafood. There is a great opportunity here to build an internationally competitive industry that will create a range of skilled, non-seasonal jobs for the region,” Mr Joyce says.

“The Government has already contributed $200,000 to scientific surveys that identified potential areas for finfish aquaculture.

“An additional $750,000 will now be made available to fund the significant amount of further scientific and social research that will be required to determine the environmental and cultural suitability of sites in Stewart Island.”

Mr Guy says aquaculture is a high value industry and the Government would like to see the industry’s contribution grow, for the benefit of Southland and the wider economy.

“Marine farming technologies are advancing and ever more able to create new production and harvesting methods and high value products, which will help Southland diversify and reduce any dependence on commodities.”

“This is an opportunity that will require collaboration across central and local government, support from the local community and private investment.”

The Southland Regional Development Strategy Action Plan has been developed by the region with central government support. It forms part of the Government’s Regional Growth Programme, which looks to increase jobs, income and investment in regional New Zealand.

Individual actions in the plan are led by various different agencies.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Zhengchang company profile



Established in 1918, Zhengchang has made constant innovations in feed machinery industry and accumulated a wealth of experience in tackling the various challenges facing feed companies and, more importantly, is able to offer a range of comprehensive solutions.

ZCME has now evolved into China’s largest manufacture of feed machinery and has 16 branches in China with over 1300 staff and more than thirty offices all over the world.

Zhengchang to date has successfully constructed more than 2000 turnkey projects around the world, covering the fields of poultry and livestock feed, aquatic feed, pet food, premix feed, sawdust pellets, fertilizer, silo storage, pasture, electrical control and garbage treatment etc.

ZCME projects are designed to deliver to the client higher feed quality, higher overall capacity and greater profits.


Zhengchang have overcome many challenges for their customers and accumulated rich experience over the past 90 years.

According to their website, "we are now making great endeavors to apply our latest achievements to feed, pasture, environment protection, fertiliser, and sawdust shaping industries".


Zhengchang is more than a professional partner who can provide advanced machinery, technology and management ideas. It is also a true problem solver who knows you well enough to oversee your development.

Zhengchang is with you every step of the way.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

09/12/2016: Diversify, an EU aquaculture project

by Rocio Robles, Dissemination leader, Aquaculture Technological Cenrer of Andalusia (CTAQUA), Muelle Commercial s/n, 11510 El Puerto de Santa María, Cádiz, Spain and Constantinos C. Mylonas, Project Coordinator, Institute of Marine Biology, Biotechnology and Aquaculture, Hellenic Center for Marine Research (HCMR), Iraklion, Crete, Greece

“DIVERSIFY”: EU project exploring the biological and socio-economic potential of new/emerging candidate finfish species for the expansion of the European aquaculture industry

DIVERSIFY began in December 2013 to acquire the necessary knowledge for the diversification of the European Aquaculture production based on new/emerging finfish species.

The project has a total budget of €11.8 million for its 5 year duration (2013-2018), making it one of the largest research projects in the area of aquaculture funded by the European Commission.

DIVERSIFY has identified a number of new/emerging finfish species, with great potential for the expansion of the EU aquaculture industry.

Fig. 1 greater amberjack given GnRHa implants 1
These fishes are fast growing and/or large species marketed at a large size and can be processed into a range of value-added products in order to provide the consumer with a greater diversity of fish species and products.

The fish species included are meagre (Argyrosomus regius), greater amberjack (Seriola dumerili); wreckfish (Polyprion americanus) and Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus).

In addition, the omnivorous and euryhaline grey mullet (Mugil cephalus) is also included, as it can be produced in a wide variety of environments and using low cost feed with small amounts or no fish meal/oils, and the pikeperch (Sander lucioperca) as a good freshwater species for recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS).

Each of the species selected for DIVERSIFY has the potential to grow in the market and to produce value-added products.

Their biological and economical potential are expected to stimulate the growth of the European aquaculture sector. Reproduction & Genetics Great success has been achieved in the control of reproduction of greater amberjack.

Spontaneous natural spawns have been obtained in tanks in the Canary Islands (Spain), while in the Mediterranean Sea stocks the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) implants has resulted in the production of large numbers of good quality eggs
(Fig. 1).

Read more HERE.

Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Thursday, December 8, 2016

09/12/2016: Aquaculture Without Frontiers: Creating new platforms for our beneficiaries

by Clifford Spencer, AwF

The proposed AwF visits to Vietnam and Ethiopia I mentioned in my last report have now taken place and the resultant journey threw up a variety of interesting scenarios for aquaculture.
 
Clifford Spencer

As a sign of this charity’s commitment to its objectives a full five members of the six strong board of AwF visited both countries.

In Vietnam there is already a strongly developed system of aquaculture where the business of farming shrimps and fish is part of life and is strongly embedded in the social fabric of the country.

This contrasts greatly with aquaculture in Europe where it sits within a setting of knowledge and industry ‘silos’ that often compete for public and thus governmental support and acceptance, and in so doing often prevent much needed development.

e.g. water management, environmental regulation, recreational needs in coastal areas, food culture and the advent of fast food and external catering activity to public demand and the supplier requirements for these outlets.

I gave a talk in Vietnam at their annual Vietstock event in Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon) on the growth, decline and shifts in fish markets in the EU, US, Japan and China and my research for that provided some alarming figures for in particular changing eating habits, resultant food demand and as a consequence food supply and human health.

The switch to Western diets in Japan for instance has significantly reduced its per capita intake of fish due to the influx and growth of western styled red and white meats being promoted in fast food in the market place.


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Jefo company profile




Jefo is a world leader in the field of non-medicated performance feed additives for the poultry, swine, ruminant and aquaculture sectors. Founded in Canada in 1982, today Jefo has offices on 5 continents, and specialises in the design, manufacturing, warehousing and JIT-distribution of an array of animal nutrition specialty products.

Jefo is a pioneer in the green revolution taking place in animal nutrition.

According to their website: "Our commitment is to providing effective alternatives for optimal performances in animal nutrition".

The Europe / Africa division of Jefo was created in 1998 and is headquartered in Nantes, France. We market a line of original products including vitamins, enzymes, organic acids and essential oils.

Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

08/12/2016: The operational activity of Milling4Life makes a flying start

by Clifford Spencer 

The M4L (Milling4Life) team has just returned from the IAOM event in Ethiopia, where I am happy to report that our initial launch activity went smoothly, and more importantly, we have started to build interest in a potential project to address our objectives on improving human nutrition on the African continent.

Developing African states, in particular Ethiopia in Sub-Saharan Africa, is home to some of the most nutritionally insecure people in the world.  

Clifford Spencer
While food availability is clearly important to achieving food security, having the means to effectively access and utilise quality food remains central to good nutrition.

Protein-energy malnutrition is observed most frequently in developing countries such as Ethiopia. During our visit to the IAOM we had interesting discussions with the Ethiopian Millers Association and benefited from the skilled input of their vice-President on a proposal to boost the use of a successful Ethiopian crop (Beans) as a protein source for direct human nutrition and also as a protein based feed for domestic fish production for the population of Ethiopia.

Aquaculture has the potential of producing large quantities of lower-cost, protein rich food; whilst at the same time contributing to the livelihoods of the rural poor because it generates food of high value.

Aquaculture therefore is the most important source of growth in fish supply for human consumption.

However in Ethiopia fish protein accounts for 0.1 percent of protein in the diet, and nearly all is sourced from fisheries as opposed to aquaculture, which is a nascent industry in Ethiopia.

The skill of the miller 
What ensued was a prime example of the skill of the miller being brought to bear on the most significant problem facing the 100 million strong Ethiopian population i.e. feeding themselves with a healthy life giving diet.

The regular provision of high quality protein is essential for human life and especially for pregnant women and in particular their children in the important formative first few years of their life.

Helpfully Ethiopia is the second largest producer of Faba beans globally but there is much to do to make them suitable for various forms of human consumption. Firstly Faba beans have an anti-nutritional compound in their shell so its removal is a key process for the miller.

Also pin-milling of faba bean seeds, either whole or de-hulled, produces flours that contain two distinct populations of particles of size and density. Using air-classification separation techniques produces a protein concentrate (the light fraction) and a starchy flour (the heavy fraction).
 


Helpfully the application of air-classification techniques to grain legume processing has relatively low capital requirements and removes the need for costly effluent disposal operations. As a guide the composition of the protein “light” fraction and starch “heavy” fraction obtained by passing the seeds through the pin-mill and air classifier is given in the table below.

We can then by example, through the skill of the miller, use the bean flour as the basis for producing a pelleted fish feed that is nutritionally balanced (with the required additional inputs) in tailored rations.

This is to provide the desired rapid growth in the fish being fed. We will need to see the establishment of complimentary fish feeding trials in Ethiopia to provide experience and data to allow a successful industrial development.

However in this respect and through the Ethiopian government we are already in conversation with the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation program manager for aquaculture development in Ethiopia.

We are also currently in discussions with UK and EU funders for this programme and an Ethiopian miller is a potential recipient of funding for the milling side of this development.


Read the full article HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

08/12/2016: Latest (27th) edition of the NOAH Code of Practice now available

The latest edition of the NOAH Code of Practice for the Promotion of Animal Medicines has now been published.

Regularly updated to ensure it stays relevant and effective to meet the ever-evolving communication climate, the 27th edition is effective from 1 December.

 
Image: Chris Brown
The changes include a revised Guidance Note on advertising POM medicines, giving guidance on how to ensure the important communication channel that promotion brings is used responsibly.

Dawn Howard, NOAH Chief Executive says: “NOAH believes in the benefit of advertising POMs to prescribers and professional keepers of animals, as specified in the Veterinary Medicines regulations, but we believe that this needs great care and responsibility in the preparation of advertisements and promotions, to support the responsible use of these products.”

In addition, there is a new Guidance Note to help companies involved with international conferences and the process for reviewing and making changes to the Code has been formalised.

“Every NOAH member, as well as non-member participants in the NOAH Compendium, signs up to the NOAH Code, which goes above and beyond any regulatory requirements. This can give prescribers and users of animal medicines confidence in the promotions they may receive from NOAH members,” added Dawn Howard.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news