Friday, January 18, 2019

Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference registration is now open

Registration for VIV Asia's Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference is now open!

International Aqua Feed magazine and Dr Mian N Riaz, Head of Extrusion Technology at Texas A&M University System are hosting a one-day Aqua Feed Conference at VIV Asia, Bangkok on March 13th, 2019.
This conference will focus on extrusion principles, raw material, grinding, aqua feed extrusion, different types of extruders and their application, drying of aqua feed, how to improve the aqua feed quality, managing the aqua feed facility and several other related topics.
Speakers for the event include Jonathan Iman of CPS, Charles Engrem of Wenger, Nils Lastein of Andritz, Olaf Naehrig of Amandus Kahl, Thomas Wilson of DSM, Olivier Dream of Clextral as well as Dr Mian Riaz of Texas A&M University and Tuti Tan and Roger Gilbert of International Aquafeed magazine.

Registration for the event is now open!
Tickets cost US $199, which supplies attendees with entry into the conference and two coffee breaks provided.

More information about the conference is available HERE.

Read the full article HERE.










The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Global RAS experts to gather at RAStech 2019



RAStech is jointly hosted by Annex Business Media, publishers of Hatchery International and RAStech magazine, and Virginia Tech. Oxygen Solutions and Veolia Water Technologies are the platinum sponsors.


"We are working with different associations and organisations in the aquaculture industry to develop the education sessions and ensure that we continue to provide a high quality education conference for our attendees," Mr Kuhn added.



Innovation is vital to the growth and success of recirculating aquaculture systems. RAStech 2019 features education sessions that highlight the latest innovations and case studies in RAS engineering, aquaponics, fish health management, biosecurity, and energy management. Plus, some great sessions on raising marine species in RAS environments, RAS feeds management and much more.

This international event also features a tradeshow showcasing the latest in RAS products and services from around the world, providing attendees a first-hand look at new technologies that can help boost their RAS projects.

With two full days of learning and networking, RAStech 2019 is one international aquaculture conference you cannot miss. Save big on hotel and registration by signing up before the early bird deadline of March 8th. Registration is limited to just 250 attendees, so don't delay.

For more details and to register visit the event website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Grinding of raw materials for aquafeeds

by Arthur vom Hofe, CPM Europe, Netherlands

Hammermills are commonly used for grinding a broad range of materials used in the production of aquaculture feeds. This article is for people who always wanted to know more about a hammermill, but also especially for those who are not so much interested because they have already a hammermill which is running fine… already for twenty years.
 


Or also those who are going to purchase a machine and think that the purchase price is the key. The fact is that a hammermill can use >50 times its purchase price during its life time in energy, proves that energy efficiency is thus the determining factor when choosing a hammermill.

Let’s have a closer look to what is really happening in a hammer mill. A hammermill consists of a fast-rotating rotor with swinging hardened hammers. Product entering the grinding chamber is reduced in particles size by the impact of the rotating hammers. The particles are leaving the chamber through a screen with small holes.

Grinding chamber shape
Well understandable is that the speed differential between the product and the hammer determines the impact, which is required to reduce the particle size of the incoming product. A tear-drop shaped hammermill chamber will maintain the speed differential better than traditional circular chambers. This because the rotation of the product in the chamber which didn’t escape after the first hit is effectively reduced.

One of the most recent innovations is the specially designed fine grind inserts. These are abrasive resistant beater bars that follow part of the rotation of the hammers to increase grinding impact area. They are installed in the upper corners of the hammermill grinding chamber and are replaceable. The fine grind insert system improves overall fineness of grind and efficiency. It also allows for a larger screen hole size to achieve desired product, and helps to achieve an increased screen life.

Tip speed (& relation screen hole diameter)
Depending on the application, an ideal tip speed can be selected. For more efficient fine grinding, fibrous materials at a high tip speed should be selected, while course grinding and brittle products ask for a lower tip speed. Tip speed is simply a factor of mill diameter and motor RPM; so for fine grinding the larger diameter mill is the most efficient.

With a higher tip speed (larger diameter hammermill) a finer grind can be achieved at a certain screen hole size compared to lower tip speeds (smaller diameter hammermills). It is not hard to imagine the benefits of grinding with larger diameter holes towards energy consumption and screen wear (operational costs).


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Almex company profile



Almex specialises in single screw extrusion equipment, from the extrusion unit to complete installations. They are a family owned, independent company. 

Almex extruders and Contivar Expanders are in use worldwide for fishfeed, oil extraction, petfood, animalfeed plants, the food industry and the processing and chemical industries. Almex started early 1970's with repair and installation of extruders.

For use in Europe these units needed much modifications, so they decided to design and built in the Netherlands a complete range of extruders for 500 to 15.000 kg/hour capacity.

These extruders did find their way to clients worldwide. Today the largest extruder has a diameter of 400 mm, a barrel length of 4800 mm and a drive of 500 kW.

Visit the Almex website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Fumonisins in aquaculture: The most sensitive species

by Rui A Gonçalves, Biomin Holding, Austria

In aquaculture, fumonisins (FUM) have generally been associated with reduced growth rate, feed consumption and feed efficiency, and impaired sphingolipid metabolism.

Fumonisin toxicity is related to this ability to inhibit sphinganine (sphingosine) N-acyltransferase (ceramide synthase), a key enzyme in lipid metabolism, disrupting this pathway. This is due to the long-chain hydrocarbon unit (similar to that of sphingosine and sphinganine) in these mycotoxins, which plays a role in their toxicity.
 


Sensitivity of freshwater species
Little information is available on the effects of fumonisins on aquaculture species, and most research focuses on freshwater species.

The channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is the most widely studied species. According to authors, such as Goel, Li and Lumbertdacha, these fish can tolerate relatively high levels of FUM, with a sensitivity level of around 10 mg fumonisin B1 (FB1)/kg feed. Adverse effects of fumonisin-contaminated diets have also been reported in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.): various experiments have observed scattered lesions in the exocrine and endocrine pancreas, and interrenal tissue, probably due to ischemia and/or increased endothelial permeability.

In another study by Pepeljnjak, one-year-old carp were fed pellets containing 500, 5,000 or 150,000 µg FB1/kg body weight, resulting in weight loss and alterations in hematological and biochemical parameters in target organs.

Tuan et al. (2003) demonstrated that feeding FB1 to tropical species at 10, 40, 70 and 150 mg/kg feed for 8 weeks affected growth in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fingerlings. In this experiment, average weight gain in fish fed diets containing 40,000 µg FB1/kg or more were lower. Hematocrit was only reduced in the tilapia given 150,000 µg FB1/kg feed. The ratio of free sphinganine to free sphingosine (Sa:So ratio) in the liver increased at 150,000 µg FB1/kg feed.

Pacific whiteleg shrimp
To the author’s knowledge, the only crustacean species studied to date with respect to sensitivity to FUM is the Pacific whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). Despite slight variations in testing levels, the few studies available suggest that Litopenaeus vannamei is much more sensitive to FB1 than previously described in freshwater species. García-Morales et al. (2013) have shown that soluble muscle protein concentration was reduced, and changes were observed in the thermodynamic properties of myosin, after 30 days' exposure to FUM in Pacific whiteleg shrimp fed 20 to 200 µg FB1/kg feed.

The same authors reported marked histological changes in the tissues of shrimp fed a diet containing 200 µg FB1/kg feed, and changes in meat quality after 12 days of ice storage in fish fed more than 600 µg FUM/kg feed. The effect of FUM on muscle quality may be of great importance, especially for shrimp-exporting countries, as it directly affects shelf life. The study by Burgos-Hernández et al. in 2005 also confirmed that FB1 causes histological changes in the shrimp hepatopancreas as a result of alterations in trypsin and collagenase activity.

Mexía-Salazar et al. (2008) also observed marked histological changes in the hepatopancreas, as well as necrotic tissue, in shrimp fed 500 µg FB1/kg. These authors also observed changes in both the electrophoretic patterns and the thermodynamic properties of the myosin extracted from shrimp exposed to FB1.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Liptosa company profile

  
LípidosToledo SA began in 1996 as a family business and under the guidance of a group of professionals with extensive experience in the Animal Nutrition field. 

From the outset, the company's mission has been to provide its clients with personalised service and efficient, natural products that are able to meet the demands of the sector.

In 2000 Lípidos Toledo SA moved its facilities, building a modern manufacturing plant in Talavera de la Reina (Toledo, Spain). In 2012 it acquired a new industrial warehouse in the vicinity of the main facilities where the manufacturing of the powder additives takes place and a third storage warehouse.

With these new facilities Lípidos Toledo SA is able to have separate manufacturing lines for the different products they manufacture, avoiding the risk of cross contamination.

Furthermore, the new facilities enable the company to manufacture products with fishmeal derivatives, allowing the company further expansion, mainly in the aquaculture range.

The facilities allow the manufacture of nutritional products, liquid and powder based phytobiotic additives, nutraceutical products and nutritional and specialty products without any risk of the products becoming cross contaminated.

In 2010, Lípidos Toledo SA acquired a large office space at C/ San Romualdo 12-14 in Madrid, Spain where all logistics work is carried out. This enables Lípidos Toledo SA to fulfil its objective of manufacturing products of the highest quality and providing its clients the best service.


Visit the Liptoaqua website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Programme for the Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference is revealed

The Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference, being arranged by International Aquafeed magazine, in association with VIV, has recently released the information regarding their conference programme.


The programme is as follows:

8.30 AMRegistration and Welcome -Tuti Tan and Roger Gilbert, International Aqua Feed Magazine, UK
9.00 AMIntroduction and Principles of Extrusion Technology‐ Dr Mian Riaz, Texas A&M University, USA
9.45 AMPlant Layout, Equipment Design & Food Safety Considerations for Aquatic Feed Facilities- Jonathan Iman, Corporate Project Services, USA
10.30 AMCoffee Break
10.45AMMaking Floating and Sinking Feed with Twin-Screw Extrusion Technology - Olivier Drean, Clextral, France
11.30 AM - Developing an Effective and Efficient Micro Extrusion Process Design - Charles Engrem – Wenger Manufacturing, USA
12.15 PM - Lunch Break
1.15 PMExtruded Shrimp Feed- Nils Lastein- Andritz, Austria
2.00 PM The New Kahl Extruder OEE 25 NG (Next Generation) for up to 10 T/H Extruded Fish Feed– Olaf Naehrig- Amandus Kahl
2.45 PM Coffee Break    
3.00 PMAqua Feed Production by Extrusion and the Use of Heat-Sensitive Ingredients and Additives- Dr Thomas Wilson- DSM
3.45 PM - Raw Material Properties for Aqua Feed Extrusion- Dr Mian Riaz, Texas A&M University, USA
4.30 PM - Q/A session and Certificate Distribution


This one-day conference will focus on extrusion principles, raw material, grinding, aqua feed extrusion, different types of extruders and their application, drying of aqua feed, how to improve the aqua feed quality, managing the aqua feed facility and several other related topics.
Pre-registration is required for the event. Tickets cost US $199, and 50 delegate spaces are also available.

The sponsors for the event include Andritz, CPS, Wenger, Clextral, Amandus Kahl and DSM.















More information about the conference is available HERE.

Registration to attend the event is also available HERE.

Read the full article HERE.





The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Call for proposals to accelerate sustainable ocean use

The Belmont Forum seeks proposals to accelerate ocean sustainable use; the World Ocean Council will work to ensure industry engagement

The Belmont Forum call for proposals on "Transdisciplinary Research for Ocean Sustainability", in collaboration with Future Earth and JPI Oceans, aims to bring together researchers and other expertise to innovate solutions to advance sustainable use of the ocean and minimise the effects of climate change. The deadline for project pre-registration is 31 January 2019.
 


To address the complex challenges facing the ocean, there is a need for integrated, interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral approaches. Research consortia should bring together natural and social sciences and other societal partners, including the private sector, to co-design, co-develop and co-implement these efforts.

For research consortia interested in proposing projects, the World Ocean Council (WOC) provides a unique private sector partner focused on global multi-industry leadership, collaboration and action for ocean science and sustainable development. The WOC brings the potential to engage leadership companies as part of research teams and a global network of 35,000 ocean industry stakeholders from around the world and across the sectors.

The Belmont Forum invites research consortia to address one or both of the following topics:

Topic 1 – Pathways towards sustainable and equitable use of oceans
This topic focuses on the environmental, social, cultural and economic impacts of living and non-living resource extraction (e.g. fisheries, aquaculture, dredging, mining of sand and minerals), and non-extractive industries (e.g. shipping, tourism). Research in this area should address the impacts of economic activities on ecosystems, human societies including human health and well-being, cultures and economies, as well as the capacities of social systems to respond to these impacts.

Topic 2 – Accounting for and minimising impacts of global change
Sustainably using the ocean depends on an understanding of the multi-scale changes in ocean systems, and the additive or synergistic effects of the multiple causes of these changes. Applications addressing this topic should include research on the interactions between stressors, such as climate change, ocean acidification, pollution, deoxygenation and food scarcity; biological processes such as range shifts and biodiversity changes; and ocean dynamics, such as circulation, temperature and sea level changes.

This call endeavors to support medium-sized research projects with 3 to 4 years' duration. Development of research consortia, supported financially by at least three participating partner agencies established in three different countries, is a key criterion. Global geographic diversity to increase the scalability and applicability of project outcomes is encouraged.

Proposal submission will occur in two steps:
1) Mandatory pre-registration of projects (via the Belmont Forum application portal, HERE), and 2) Submission of invited full proposals.

For further details visit the Belmont forum website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Fish for the Future

by MSD Animal Health, a division of Merck & Co, USA

Beef and chicken often come to mind when people think about protein. But with the world’s population growing, the need for more sources of protein like seafood increases too.

“Fish provide an excellent source of protein, vitamins, minerals and heart-healthy fats,” says Luc Grisez, PhD, Executive Director, Global Aquaculture Research and Development, MSD Animal Health.
 


“The challenge is to prevent deadly diseases that can compromise animal well-being and threaten entire fish farms and the food supply. Protecting fish from disease and controlling bacteria, viruses and parasites is vital to ensure consistent fish harvests, which contributes to fish health, welfare and safety.”

Fish account for about 17 percent of all animal proteins and seven percent of all proteins worldwide. On average, fish provide about 3.2 billion people with almost 20 percent of average per capita intake of animal protein. In fact, China, Japan and the United States eat the most fish of all countries globally.

MSD Animal Health is one of the world’s leading developers and marketers of medicines and vaccines that help treat and prevent diseases, especially in salmon and tilapia. The company’s focus is to identify and treat specific aquaculture diseases, delivering both preventative and treatment options, and work with fish farms around the world to implement good farm management practices and protocols to ensure cleaner and healthier fish.

After all, fish health, welfare and safety need to be effectively managed during the treatment cycle and at key points in the production cycle.

“Fish diseases are prevalent everywhere and they can disrupt production in an instant,” says Chris Beattie, PhD, Executive Director of Aquaculture, MSD Animal Health.

“It's important that we discover which diseases are present, how to maintain control, and how to effectively protect fish from future exposure.”

Keeping Fish Healthy
Approximately 600 aquatic species are raised via aquaculture, according to the World Ocean Review Report. Keeping these fish healthy is no small task for fish farmers. Vaccinating early helps to reduce the need to treat with antibiotics when fish get sick.

Aquatic diseases pose a serious threat to the farmed-fish industry. Infected populations can cause harvests to dwindle, resulting in significant losses for producers. Some of the most common diseases among farmed tilapia worldwide are Streptococcus agalactiae and iniae.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Leiber company profile


Now with more than 140 employees, with each one a specialist in his or her domain, Leiber has a well-proven team in a company following a clear strategy for more than 50 years: working with values.

“What makes us unique? We focus on what we know best. Yeast. Production on the highest level of quality. Latest technology. New findings from science and research. The performance of a team of specialists. 

This is what defines Leiber´s strategic orientation. This is what makes us truly entrepreneurial”, as explained on the Leiber website.

“The markets´ requirements are changing - we are able to follow. This is how we became one of the leading manufacturers of specialised yeast products”.

Visit the website HERE.





 The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Monday, January 14, 2019

Aquaponics Association Annual Conference 2019

The Aquaponics Association's 2019 conference will be held at Kentucky State University in Frankfort, Kentucky, USA in September.

Kentucky State University hosts one of the most advanced aquaculture research programs in the USA, including indoor aquaponics research systems, saltwater aquaponics research, a 30" x 70" aquaponics demonstration greenhouse, a 10,000sq foot recirculating aquaculture research building, and 33 research ponds.

 
Image credit: IMCBeria College on Flickr
(CC BY 2.0)
The goal of the conference is to unite growers from around the world and advance the practice of aquaponics. The Aquaponics Association looks to build on the momentum of the last annual conferences Putting Down Roots in Portland, Oregon, 2017; and Putting Up Shoots in Hartford, Connecticut, 2018. Each hosted the world's top aquaponics experts, a vendor showroom of the top aquaponics technology and services, and tours of large-scale aquaponics projects.

Frankfort, Kentucky is a small, quaint town with some of the nation's top bourbon distilleries, the Keenland Racetrack, and other cultural attractions close by. Frankfort is reachable from Bluegrass Airport (LEX); Greater Cincinnati – Northern Kentucky Int'l Airport (CVG); and 60 minute Louisville Airport (SDF).

Further information regarding the conference weekend are to be announced at a later date.

Visit the Aquaponics Association website, HERE, or contact info@aquaponicsassociation.org

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Good deeds pay off in the long run

by Sven-Olof Malmqvist

There are quite an extensive amount of aquafeed producers in the world, but some companies differ, at least I believe so. One of these is Aller Aqua, as shown by their activities in Africa.

Apart from the normal production of feed, sales and marketing they also try to achieve something extra in the community in which they are operating. They are also using different social platforms, telling everyone who wants to know what they are actually doing. They also involve themselves in education, both locally and internationally. Maybe there are other companies doing the same thing but not telling the public in the same way as Aller Aqua is?
 


Another company doing a good job in Africa is Skretting, setting up catfish production on a small scale in Nigeria, together with the local government and various NGO’s , universities and other stakeholders. I know there is one big feed company in Bangladesh doing the same thing, helping the smallholders with education, and also financing, in order to start up individual business.

I would like to challenge the big companies to compete on the world stage with numerous activities to stimulate production and progress, irrespective of what type of production it is and where it is.

For those who has been reading my previous columns, you may remember my failure with crayfish production in one of my ponds at the farm, due to the drought earlier in the summer, which actually dried it out totally and my dream of having my own crayfishes died out as well.

But I am happy to inform you that after some rain the water level is back to normal, and the other day I spotted at least one survivor! It will be rather interesting to find out next year if the lone crayfish gets more friends? It gives you the insight how important water is for all life but also tells you how strong the instinct to survive is.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Ottevanger Milling Engineers company profile



Ottevanger Milling Engineers is a leading European company in the design and manufacture of equipment and complete installations for the grain-processing and mixed-feed industries.

Food producers throughout the world use these installations to produce food for people and animals. In modern, well-equipped plants in Aalten and Moerkapelle (The Netherlands) Ottevanger's specialists use the latest technologies to design and manufacture a comprehensive range of products.

Computer-controlled plants – anywhere in the world – are provided with on-line technical support from these plants. In its design of any installation Ottevanger takes into account the strictest environmental regulations and safety requirements.

There are, for example, always adequate facilities for air purification as well as sound and heat insulation. A lot of attention is also devoted to hygiene through the use of stainless steel and special coatings.

Thanks to its expert knowledge and expertise, amassed throughout its over one hundred years' experience, Ottevanger is the ideal partner for the implementation of your project.

Visit the Ottevanger website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Sunday, January 13, 2019

Why is Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) developing more easily, and at a larger scale, in China than in the western world?

Dr Thierry Chopin, Professor of Marine Biology, University of New Brunswick, Canada

In both Asian countries (particularly in China) and western world countries, there is a renewed interest in the development of what we now call Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture or IMTA.

The approaches are completely different, resulting in very different speeds of adoption and implementation of the practice; however, the differences are maybe not an extreme case of apples and oranges, and there is great merit in analysing their differences and convergences to develop what should become the efficient and responsible food, and co-product, production systems of the future.
 


The western world FIS and the Asian SIF approaches
Several western world research groups working on IMTA have spent the last two-to-three decades developing small-scale, mostly pre-commercial, IMTA operations, by modifying relatively small fish sites to co-cultivate invertebrates and seaweeds.

Modern fish aquaculture (F) developed in the 1970-80’s, and invertebrate and seaweed aquacultures (I and S) were added in the 2000’s. This is what we can call the FIS approach; (70-80’s/00’s/00’s). Commercial scaling-up has not been easy: while the biological and environmental advantages of this practice are generally accepted, adoption barriers have been mostly economic and regulatory.

Asian countries have a long tradition of using different types of IMTA, long before this acronym was created in 2004. The approach in modifying their sites has been diametrically opposed: seaweed sites have seen the development of smaller invertebrate, and later fish, infrastructures (the SIF approach; 50’s/80’s/90’s). IMTA operations are now covering vast dedicated areas.

A historical background favourable to the development of IMTA in China
There is a long tradition of operating freshwater IMTA systems in China. Rice-fish systems have existed for more than 1,200 years and covered 3.3 million hectares in 2000. The benefits are at several levels: 1) full use of limited agricultural land; 2) fish nutrients are available to rice; 3) fish eat rice pests; 4) there are reduced fungal infections; 5) farming the sea is generally more lucrative than farming land (no irrigation, in particular); 6) there is an increased diversification of agricultural products; and 7) all the above led to farmers increasing their income.

Because of these advantages, demonstrated over centuries, there is strong government support at all levels for the practice, and practical policies have been put in place. Moreover, over time many variations appeared: rice-fish-crab, rice-fish-duck, rice-shrimp, etc.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

DSM announced as fourth sponsor for Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference

DSM have been confirmed as the latest sponsor for the Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference, taking place at VIV Asia on 13th March 2019.







Koninklijke DSM N.V.(Royal DSM) are sponsor number four, for VIV Asia's specialist extrusion conference.

DSM are a Dutch company, that specialise in health, nutrition, and materials. They were founded in 1902, and are headquartered in Heerlen, the Netherlands.

The one-day Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference, organised by International Aquafeed magazine and Dr Mian Riaz, Head of Extrusion Technology at Texas A&M University, is a informative conference on all things extrusion.

This conference will focus on extrusion principles, raw material, grinding, aqua feed extrusion, different types of extruders and their application, drying of aqua feed, how to improve the aqua feed quality, managing the aqua feed facility and several other related topics.

Pre-registration is required for this event - tickets cost US $199. Participants will receive certificates for completing the conference.

More information is available HERE.


Registration is available HERE.


The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wenger company profile

From small-town entrepreneur to worldwide leader. With a little ingenuity and a lot of hard work, brothers Joe and Louis Wenger founded Wenger Mixing Company in a small Kansas (USA) town in 1935. They went on to design a machine that blended molasses with dry feedstuffs and produced pellets in 1948.

Theirs was the first extrusion cooking system and the basic technology for all commercial extruders used today.  The Wenger brothers' novel idea created a worldwide industry. And, seventy-five years later, Wenger Manufacturing, Inc. is still a family-owned business committed to groundbreaking innovation in the extrusion market.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by 
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Friday, January 11, 2019

Clextral, CPS and Wenger confirmed as sponsors for Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference

The latest set of sponsors for the Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference, taking place at VIV Asia on 13th March 2019, have been confirmed as CPS, Wenger and Clextral.






- Corporate Project Services (CPS), a division of Wenger, are experienced planning experts who create extrusion-based projects. Their project planning and consulting services ensure each project is of optimal quality and brilliant quality.
- Wenger Manufacturing, founded in 1935 in USA, create over 14 different lines of twin and single-screw extruders for grain and food processing.
- Clextral, based in France, are leading experts in extrusion technology, including twin-screw extruders, dryers and ancillary equipment.

The one-day Aqua Feed Extrusion Conference, organised by International Aquafeed magazine and Dr Mian Riaz, Head of Extrusion Technology at Texas A&M University, is a informative conference on all things extrusion.
This conference will focus on extrusion principles, raw material, grinding, aqua feed extrusion, different types of extruders and their application, drying of aqua feed, how to improve the aqua feed quality, managing the aqua feed facility and several other related topics.
Pre-registration is required for this event - tickets cost US $199. Participants will receive certificates for completing the conference.

Registration is available HERE.


Read the full article HERE.


The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

3rd World Aquaculture & Marine Biology Congress

The 3rd World Aquaculture & Marine Biology Congress is taking place this June, in Osaka, Japan.



The congress will be taking place June 19th-20th 2019, with the theme 'Transformations in Fisheries and Aquaculture'. A variety of topics will be discussed at the two-day congress, such as aquatic science, aquaculture modelling and technologies, aquaponics, aquaculture nutrition and supplies, coastal and marine aquaculture, advances in seafood processing, open ocean aquaculture, coral reefs, limnology and much more.
The event is aimed at CEOs, Managers, Directors, professors, students, research scholars and business entrepeneurs. It serves as a brilliant way for members of the aquaculture industry to come together and network and build connections for this ever-changing industry.

A number of thrilling sessions and talks will also be delivered during the congress, which are part of ten sessions:

Session One - Aquaculture: Recent Challenges and Future Advances
Session Two - Mari Culture
Session Three - Culture, Nutrition and Feed
Session Four - Technologies and Industries in Aquaculture
Session Five - Coastal and Marine Ecosystems
Session Six - Fisheries Science and Technology
Session Seven - Industrial Aquaculture
Session Eight - Fisheries Science and Management
Session Nine - Oceanography
Session Ten - Fish Hatchery

A full congress programme will be available soon.

Read the full article HERE.

More information about the event is available HERE.

You can also register for the conference HERE.

Stay tuned to International Aquafeed magazine, for more updates about this event!

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

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