Sunday, February 18, 2018

19/02/2018: AgraME’s aquaculture conference to highlight regional investment opportunities and international best practice

Officially endorsed by the Ministry of Climate Change and Environment, AgraME, which is taking place on 6-8th March at the Dubai World Trade Centre, is set to bring together local and international experts within the aquaculture sector to host a dedicated, free-to-attend, conference on the opening day focusing on the regions burgeoning aquaculture industry

Delivering the first keynote will be Dr Ali Al Shaikhi, Director General of Fisheries Production, Ministry of Environment, Water & Agriculture – Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. On the back of a number of recent investments to boost environmental capacity in the Kingdom, Ministry representatives will be discussing aquaculture prospects in the Kingdom and look at projects leading toward their Vision 2030 which has gained international headlines in recent months.
 


“We have received huge support from both local and overseas aquaculture experts and will bring together knowledge sharing from around the globe to help the growth of Aquaculture in the Middle East. Our visitors are excited to hear what The Ministry of Environment, Water & Agriculture- Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the South African Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Innovation Norway and others have to say and the conference will form a great opportunity for learning and networking” said Samantha Bleasby, Exhibition Director, AgraME.

Bringing expertise from Europe, another key session of the day will be presented by Innovation Norway - the Norwegian Government's most important instrument for innovation and development of Norwegian enterprises and industry.

Ole Johan Sandvaer, Regional Director MEA for Innovation Norway will be looking at the development of a sustainable aquaculture industry within the country and how the UAE and Norway are synergistic in their approach to aquaculture; “Norwegian technology providers cover the entire value chain of the aquaculture industry, which includes high-tech products and services and modern management principles. The Middle East is known to go for the latest in technology to meet increasingly demanding consumers with products of highest quality. The aqua farming sector represents no difference.”

“The aquaculture industry has developed very fast for 50 over years and there’s no sign saying this development will slow down. Rather the opposite. One reason is that the search for the highest standards of sustainability in all parts of the aquaculture value chain will become even more important, and in this field Norway is in the lead internationally. This requires the ability to think “new”, which again will enhance innovation in all parts of the value chain”, added Mr Sandvaer.

With a more targeted focus on the Crop Farming, Animal Farming, Aquaculture and Animal Health sectors, AgraME 2018 will attract suppliers and buyers, both locally and internationally, looking to source the latest products and innovative solutions, as well as offer a content platform to discuss ways to tackle the ongoing struggle in regional food security.

For more information on the conference and to register for free, click HERE.

To exhibit at AgraME, contact Samantha Bleasby at Samantha.bleasby@informa.com

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

19/02/2018: Bluestar Adisseo announces closing of Nutriad acquisition

Bluestar Adisseo Company (“Adisseo”) announces that it has completed the acquisition of global feed additives producer Nutriad

This transaction is part of Adisseo’s strategy to become one of the worldwide leaders of specialty additives in animal nutrition. 


Adisseo and Nutriad planting a tree together
Image credit: Nutriad
 "We are pleased to have quickly brought the Nutriad acquisition to completion and excited to welcome Nutriad talents in the Adisseo team. This complementary combination supports our strategy for accelerating growth of our Specialty products business. Together, we will set up an efficient organisation which should allow us to strengthen our global product portfolio’s competitiveness and its overall efficiency”, said Adisseo CEO Jean-Marc Dublanc.

Nutriad CEO Erik Visser added, “The announcement of the acquisition of Nutriad by Adisseo has been met with overwhelming enthusiasm by our customers, suppliers, distribution partners and employees across the world. Now that we have confirmed the completion of the transaction, the Adisseo and Nutriad teams will jointly work with full energy and passion on the integration, committed to bringing further value adding solutions to the market.”

Nutriad’s product range, the species addressed (poultry, swine, aquaculture, dairy and cattle), and its customers are highly complementary to Adisseo’s and will allow the combined business to implement integrated solutions and offer even more value to customers.

A joint Adisseo/Nutriad project group has been set up and is already working on identifying and implementing the synergies.

About Adisseo 
Adisseo is one of the world's leading experts in feed additives. The group relies on its seven research centres and its production sites based in Europe and China to design, produce and market nutritional solutions for sustainable animal feed. With more than 1,900 employees, it serves around 2,600 customers in over 100 different countries through its global distribution network.

Visit the Adisseo Corporate website, HERE.

About Nutriad 
Nutriad provides feed additive solutions for animal nutrition and health to more than 1,200 customers in over 80 countries, through a network of sales offices and distributors. These are supported by four application laboratories and five manufacturing facilities on three continents.

Visit the Nutriad Corporate website, HERE

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

19/02/2018: Salmon: A new era in production management, health, nutrition and feed utilisation

by Professor Simon J Davies, Editor International Aquafeed, Professor of Fish Nutrition & Aquaculture, Harper Adams University, England

By 2057, fish producers must greatly increase production to meet the rising population and demand for seafood consumption by some 60 million tonnes. As such, aquaculture expansion is largely dependent on good quality fish fry and fingerlings for on growing under a variety of production systems throughout the world.


Continued innovations in fish breeding are necessary to provide better strains, which can adapt to new conditions such as containment in closed recirculation systems, like RAS and deep water sea farms. We have seen great advances in fish genetics, with new breeds that have superior growth characteristics, with selection for stamina and robustness to meet the challenges of husbandry and the growing threat of emerging pathogens, and infection from a host of viruses, bacteria and parasites.
 


Although this is the basis for the development of all new aquaculture scenarios, such as the highly successful YY genetically male tilapia as developed by FishGen Ltd in Wales, revolutionising the farming of this fish globally. As well as the introduction of Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) shrimp based on advanced selection techniques from the USA. This has now become particularly significant in the iconic salmon and trout industries.

We routinely farm triploid trout and also triploid salmon, which is being scrutinised as I found out when I examined a PhD thesis on the subject in Norway in 2016.

Genetic improvement, gene editing and transgenic modifications: What sets them apart?
Genetic improvement of salmon for a variety of phenotype traits is now well under way and more recently the pioneering work leading to GMO salmon (AquaBounty Technologies Inc.), becoming the first GMO animal to be approved in legislation to be marketed in the USA, making headline news.

Such transgenic fish incorporating new DNA insertion into their genome has raised some controversy, but is being slowly accepted by many and may well be a leader towards raising faster growing salmon attaining their harvest size in half the time, with the additional bonus of having superior feed utilisation in terms of protein and energy assimilation and enhanced feed conversion efficiency.

Now the advent of more refined technologies such as gene editing, offers an entirely new dimension in modulating the expression of the salmon genome. This is based on the refinement of the existing gene make-up, and by careful regulation of the transcription of specific genes via molecular editing tools. In this way we can create desirable alterations, without introducing foreign DNA into the final product. Although, in my opinion there’s nothing fundamentally wrong with adding DNA, gene editing does not involve such a process and salmon subjected to this technique will not be classed as genetically modified in the normal definition.

This contrasts with transgenic modification, where new genes are introduced (sometimes from other species), and RNA interference (RNAi), where DNA is added to effectively turn off or ‘tone down’ gene expression to enable various metabolic processes in the salmon to be controlled such as temperature tolerance and growth rate in typical intensive operations.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

PCE company profile

Pelleting Consumables Europe (PCE) is a global supplier of tailor-made, high-grade precision ring dies and roller shells.

Thanks to years of experience in the pelleting industry they can provide their customers expert advice on the geometry and design of Ring Dies and Roller Shells.

Manufacturing reliable ring dies and roller shells for compound feed, biofuel and recycling industries and a wide range of other applications.

Their tailor-made Ring Dies and Roller shells are available for pellet presses of all brands and are manufactured at their ultra-modern manufacturing facility.

As the entire process takes place In-house, they can guarantee short lead times and optimum quality.

PCE ring dies and roller shells are made of high-quality steel. The Ring Dies are manufactured as standard from high-grade, high chrome steel X46Cr13, tempered to 53-55 HRC.

The associated Roller Shells are manufactured from 100Cr6 or 20MnCr5, depending on specific application.

According to the PCE website, “our company is continuously focussed on improving the life cycle of our products and to increase profits for our customers.”

PCE key features: 
- Longer life cycle
- Higher capacity
- Low power consumption

In addition to their products they also assist with the planning of your spare and wear part inventory.

A team of experts is available to guide you by selecting the right ring dies, roller shells and to set up a service level spare part management program.

PCE is your partner for just perfect ring dies and roller shells.

Visit the PCE website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Thursday, February 15, 2018

16/02/2018: Global Aquaculture Alliance announces leadership transition

The Global Aquaculture Alliance on February 15th announced a transition in its leadership. Industry veteran Andrew Mallison is joining GAA as executive director, as Wally Stevens, who has been in the role since 2007, steps aside to focus on other strategic ventures within the organisation.

Mr Stevens will stay on as executive director through the transition, as Mr Mallison joins GAA as soon as his successor at IFFO is in place, working out of the organisation’s Portsmouth, N.H., USA, headquarters. Mr Stevens will continue to serve on GAA’s board of directors and executive committee. 


 
Andrew Mallison
Image credit: GAA
Since 2011, Mr Mallison has been director general of IFFO-The Marine Ingredients Organisation, an international trade organisation with offices in the UK, Peru and China, representing and promoting the marine ingredients sector. In that time, he relocated the head office, restructured the team, managed the relaunch of the brand and a new website, provided governance guidelines for the non-UK board and grew membership to an all-time high, particularly in China and Southeast Asia.

Also, during Mr Mallison’s tenure at IFFO, the IFFO Responsible Supply (RS) standard for producers of fishmeal and fish oil has grown from its first certification in 2010 to 134 sites in 17 countries. This represents more than 40 percent of the global production of fishmeal and fish oil, a far higher level of independent certification than any other feed ingredient. IFFO RS is now incorporated and governed independently to provide a credible and accessible standard for the industry.

Mr Mallison has a lifetime career in seafood. Before joining IFFO’s leadership team in 2011, he was director of standards and licensing for the Marine Stewardship Council from 2009 to 2011 and global sourcing manager for seafood at UK retailer Marks & Spencer from 1996 to 2009, working with suppliers from Madagascar to Alaska, including establishing an award-winning salmon-farming program in Scotland. He has also worked as technical manager for Maple Leaf Foods and as technical director for Premier Foods (UK) Ltd.

Mr Mallison has a B.Sc. in fisheries science, commercial fishing, fish farming, marine law, fisheries economics and marine biology from the University of the South West (formerly Plymouth School of Maritime Studies) in the UK and completed an executive development program at Henley Business School.

“We are delighted that Andrew Mallison is joining GAA at an exciting time in our evolution,” said Mr Stevens. “GAA was a pioneer over 20 years ago with its advocacy for responsible aquaculture practices. Leaders such as George Chamberlain saw an aquaculture landscape where changes and improvements were needed. Over the years, GAA has embraced pioneers who look with an open mind to finding solutions to the challenges facing our industry. Andrew is but the latest pioneer to lead GAA in our pursuit of an industry that is increasingly responsible and sustainable.” 


 
Wally Stevens
image credit: GAA
Mr Stevens took over as executive director of GAA in 2007. Under his leadership, GAA has experienced unprecedented growth, evolving into the world’s leading standards-setting organisation for farmed seafood through the development of its Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) third-party certification program. Since 2007, the number of BAP-certified processing plants, farms, hatcheries and feed mills has ballooned from just over 100 to nearly 1,900 today.

Also under Mr Stevens’ direction, GAA, which celebrated its 20th anniversary last year, has asserted itself as a leading voice for responsible aquaculture through its various communications vehicles, including the GOAL conference, Global Aquaculture Advocate online magazine, MyGAA online community, GAA Films and Global Aquaculture Academy online learning platform.

Mr Stevens’ career in seafood spans nearly five decades. He has held leadership positions in large, publicly traded corporations as well as start-up salmon farming operations and mid-sized, family-owned companies. His responsibilities have included all aspects of the seafood production chain. Mr Stevens has been a volunteer with the National Fisheries Institute for years, serving as chairman in 2001 and co-founding the Future Leaders program in 1998.

“The aquaculture industry has a huge contribution to make to the future of global food security, rural and developing world economies and human nutrition. Wally Stevens, George Chamberlain and the GAA team have created a successful organisation that has proved aquaculture is responsible and progressive. I look forward to being a part of GAA’s future and contributing to its continued success,” said Mr Mallison.

About GAA
The Global Aquaculture Alliance is an international, non-profit trade association dedicated to advancing environmentally and socially responsible aquaculture. Through the development of its Best Aquaculture Practices certification standards, GAA has become the leading standards-setting organisation for aquaculture seafood.

Visit the GAA website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

16/02/2018: BIOMIN Global Mycotoxin Survey highlights possible threats present in feed

Mycotoxin-related threats to the health and performance of farm animals continue to pose a challenge to the industry, according to the newly released annual results of the 2017 BIOMIN Mycotoxin Survey

“While the exact mycotoxin contamination pattern varies from one region to another and from one farm to the next, the results indicate that the mycotoxin threat should not be ignored,” cautioned Ines Taschl, Mycotoxin Risk Management Product Manager at BIOMIN.
 

Ines Taschl
Image credit: Biomin

Of the 18757 finished feed and raw commodity samples sourced from 72 countries, a full 62 percent of samples contained at least one mycotoxin present in sufficient concentrations to pose a risk to animal health or performance.

“In light of these contamination levels, it is advisable to regularly test feed ingredients and adopt a robust mycotoxin risk management program,” stated Ms Taschl.

Main trends

• Average concentrations of fumonisins in corn (maise) have risen from 993 parts per billion (ppb) in 2015 to 3095 in 2017.
• Mycotoxin contamination of soybeanmeal is higher than in years past, with 83 percent of samples from South America testing above recommended threshold levels for deoxynivalenol.
• There has been an increased prevalence of T-2 toxin in cereals and deoxynivalenol in corn versus 2016.

Multiple mycotoxin occurrence

A full 71 percent of samples contained two or more mycotoxins. Multiple mycotoxin contamination of feed presents additional problems, as certain combinations of mycotoxins are known to have synergistic effects that aggravate the negative consequences for animals.

“The reality is that you’re rarely, if ever, dealing with a single mycotoxin contamination. Mycotoxin contamination typically involves multiple mycotoxins, which can magnify the harm to farm animals” observed Ms Taschl. “The best way to protect your animals is to select a mycotoxin solution that relies on multiple strategies to counteract different types of mycotoxins,” she explained.

About the survey
The annual BIOMIN Mycotoxin Survey constitutes the longest running and most comprehensive survey of its kind, using advanced analytic tools on more than 18757 samples taken from 72 countries worldwide. The survey results provide insights on the incidence of the six major mycotoxins in the agricultural commodities used for livestock feed. Over 73692 analyses were conducted to identify the presence and potential risk posed to livestock animal production.

The full report can be found, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

16/02/2018: Tilapia: Miracle fish (part 1)

by Ramon Kourie, Chief Technical Officer, SustAqua Fish Farms (Pty) Ltd.,

In the space of 25 years global farmed tilapia production has risen from obscurity to become one of the most important farmed fish species from less than 398,000 tonnes in 1991 to a predicted global production of 6.4 million metric tonnes (MMT) in 2017
 


Projections indicate an expected growth of 2.6 percent in 2018 to 6.5 MMT, significantly lower than the average growth rate of 12 percent over the period from 2002 to 2012.

Most of the global production of tilapia is produced in freshwater pond systems and consumed in producing countries contributing to food security in the developing world where the sector is concentrated. China is the leading producer country followed by Egypt and Indonesia. Production estimates in 2017 have been pegged at 1.7 MMT for China, almost 900,000 metric tonnes (MT) for Egypt and 800,000 MT for Indonesia.

Surprisingly, less than seven percent of global tilapia production is internationally traded, the majority of which supplies growing markets in the United States and more recently Africa. Nevertheless, leading industry experts in Norway are optimistic and see tilapia fillets more broadly making inroads into global whitefish markets in developed countries at competitive prices. Whitefish is a market-oriented term categorising white fleshed, non-oily fish where fat reserves are typically in the liver and not in the flesh and guts. Core wild captured whitefish include cod, Pollack, hake, hoki and saithe species and core farmed whitefish include tilapia, pangasius, catfish, cobia and meagre.

Tilapia are the most widely cultivated of all species with more than 120 countries reporting some commercial activity. In addition, tilapia are cultivated in the highest number of production environments from rice paddies and simple fertilised earth ponds to cages in lakes, aquaponics systems, biofloc technology (BFT) tanks and Recirculation Aquaculture Systems (RAS) and are considered easy to cultivate.

The progressive expansion of tilapia aquaculture globally can be divided into three phases each marked by technological advances driven by research since the 1980’s.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Almex company profile




Almex specialises in single screw extrusion equipment, from the extrusion unit to complete installations. They are a family owned, independent company.

Almex extruders and Contivar Expanders are in use worldwide for fishfeed, oil extraction, petfood, animalfeed plants, the food industry and the processing and chemical industries. Almex started early 1970's with repair and installation of extruders.

For use in Europe these units needed much modifications, so they decided to design and built in the Netherlands a complete range of extruders for 500 to 15.000 kg/hour capacity.

These extruders did find their way to clients worldwide. Today the largest extruder has a diameter of 400 mm, a barrel length of 4800 mm and a drive of 500 kW.

Visit the Almex website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

15/02/2018: Petfood and Aquatic Feed Production Seminar

On the 27th and 28th of February, Wenger Manufacturing and Ottevanger Milling Engineers organise a special seminar about the latest challenges and solutions in Petfood and Aquatic Feed production
 

We share our latest advancements and how they fill a need or relieve a pain in your process of products. This course will lead us through the key processing centres, discussing the latest advancements in process technology, energy efficiency, product definition and feed safety concerns.

All with the goal of giving you insights or techniques to improve your company’s approach.
 

Keynotes

Day 1 – February 27th (Tuesday)

Introduction to Extruded Petfood / Aquatic Feed
Mauricio Bernardi (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
09:00 – 09:45

Ingredient decisions: Petfood / Aquatic Feed / Novelty Ingredients
Brian Streit (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
09:45 – 10:30

Conventional vs Containerised Plant Design
Paul Eijmberts (Ottevanger Milling Engineers)
11:00 – 11:45

Raw Material Intake / Storage / Cleaning (Transitional Equipment options inc.)
Hennie Pieterse (Ottevanger Milling Engineers)
11:45 -12:30

Accurate Ingredient Dosing & Mixing
Paul Eijmberts (Ottevanger Milling Engineers)
13:30 – 14:15

Size Reduction & Particle Size Control
Hennie Pieterse (Ottevanger Milling Engineers)
14:15 – 15:00

Extrusion & Nutrition: Palatability / Oxidation / Nutrient Losses / Micro Control
Brian Streit (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
15:00 – 15:45

Preconditioning
Daniel Tramp (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
16:15 – 17:00

Extrusion of Petfood & Aquatic Feeds
Spencer Lawson (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
17:00 – 17:45

Day 2 – February 28th (Wednesday)

Drying & Cooling
Jesse Mitchell (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
09:00 – 09:45

Enrobing & Post-Enrobing Cooling
Spencer Lawson (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
09:45 – 10:30

Quality Control: Online & Lab Analysis
Jesse Mitchell (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
11:00 – 11:45

Process Control & Automation
Brian Streit (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
11:45 – 12:30

Development Pathway for Petfood / Fish Feed Plant Development
Hennie Pieterse (Ottevanger Milling Engineers)
13:30 – 14:15

Final Product Handing / Storage / Bagging / Packing (Transitional Equipment options incl)
Paul Eijmberts (Ottevanger Milling Engineers)
14:15 – 15:00

Controlling Dust / Odour / Noise / Cross-Contamination & Aesthetics
Hennie Pieterse (Ottevanger Milling Engineers)
15:00 – 16:00

Latest Trends in Extrusion: High Meat & Fish Inclusion; Ultra Premium Petfoods; Pet Treats
Mauricio Bernardi (Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.)
16:00 – 16:45


Registration information 
The cost for this seminar is free, however space is limited. Attendees are responsible for hotel and transportation costs to and from the seminar. When making hotel reservations reference Wenger Manufacturing Seminar to receive the seminar room rate. Wenger and Ottevanger will provide a luncheon both days of the seminar. 

*Due to limited space, we must place a restriction of a maximum of 4 members from each company.

Seminar location 
Novotel Sydney Central Hotels & Resorts 
169-179 Thomas Street Sydney, 
NSW, 2000 Australia 
Tel: (02) 9281 6888 
www.novotelsydneycentral.com.au

About Wenger Manufacturing, Inc.
Wenger has served the global pet food and aquatic market for over 50 years andintends to continue to supply our clients with the best in class technology for you to maximise your investments.
Visit the 
Wenger Manufacturing, Inc. website, HERE.

About Ottevanger Milling Engineers
Ottevanger Milling Engineers (founded in 1909) is a leading global supplier of production equipment and processing lines for the grain processing and compound feed industry.
Visit the 
Ottevanger Milling Engineers website, HERE.

For more information on the seminar and to register, click HERE. 

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

15/02/2018: Latin American & Caribbean Aquaculture 2018

The Latin American & Caribbean Aquaculture 2018 (LACQUA18) event, will be developed together with the VIII Colombian Aquaculture Congress - VIII CCA at the Ágora Convention Centre, Bogotá, from October 23 to 26, 2018.

These events are organised by the National University of Colombia, the Colombian Federation of Aquaculture FEDEACUA and the Latin American & Caribbean Chapter of the World Aquaculture Society LACC / WAS.
 


This year is auspicious for aquaculture activity in a new Colombia, which faces challenges where we know that aquaculture is one of the activities that is providing opportunities to weave peace networks, as well as to improve the quality of life and resilience of its population.

Thus, we have proposed as the central axis, the aquaculture for the construction of peace networks (Aquaculture for peace), where we hope to have the presence of communities and entities committed to aquaculture and peace who give testimony of reconciliation and progress in our region and in the world.

It is also important to highlight that in the last year Colombia has increased its exports of fresh tilapia fillet, becoming the second country in the world exporting fresh tilapia to the United States, standing out for its strengths in the guild field, where the Colombian Federation of Aquaculture has played an essential role in the growth of the sector, empowering fish farmers to produce in a sustainable and competitive way.

The continental fish culture is represented mainly by tilapia and trout, as well as by the native species cachama, yamú and bocachico; the aquaculture in Colombia has grown six percent in 2016 compared to the previous year and for the last decade 9.01 percent. During 2016, Colombia allocated 20percent of the national production for the export market, with 7722 tons of fresh fillets exported. The fresh fillet concentrates 88 percent of exports to the United States and Canada. Fedeacua and the National Government support the increase of exportable products offer in order to catalog Colombia as the country that ships to the United States the most, among other products, fresh tilapia fillet. The Colombian production fulfills all international certifications such as ASC, Global Gap and BAP four stars.

It should be noted that Bogota, proud host of these events, is the largest city in the country. Located on the South American Andes, being recognised as a strategic place on the continent, with one of the most important airports in the region, standing out as an international center of business and studies, and starting point to the main aquaculture freshwater and marine production sites.

According to the Greater Bogotá Convention Bureau, Bogotá was admitted by the Best Cities Global Alliance network, of which high-level destinations are considered to host congresses and conventions worldwide; thus, the Colombian capital has joined Berlin, Cape Town, Copenhagen, Dubai, Edinburgh, Houston, Melbourne, Vancouver and Tokyo and becomes -the only representative of Latin America in this group. Bogota was recently highlighted by the New York Times as the 2nd tourist destination in the world to visit.

The ÁGORA International Convention Center is cataloged as the most modern in the country and one of the largest in the region. Thus, in ÁGORA there will be rooms for the presentation of research results (oral and poster), sessions for producers, mini-courses and trade fair, which will be composed of an exhibition area of 72 stands, for national and international providers that will present the latest advances in terms of equipment, supplies and services. There will also be the opportunity to participate in technical visits to fish companies of national recognition. After the success of the previous LACQUA congresses, held in Brazil, Peru and Mexico, we are sure that these events will attract the attention of the industry and the international scientific community.

Works will be received on various topics, among which are the most cultivated aquatic species in Colombia and in countries of the LACC area, with special focus on tilapia, trout, native South American fish and shrimp. Oral presentations, posters and abstracts may be made in Spanish, Portuguese or English.
 


Submission of abstracts may be made until August 1, 2018 on the event page, HERE.

Information on how to participate as an assistant, commercial exhibitor and sponsor can be consulted at the link, HERE, or on the WAS website, HERE

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

15/02/2018: Do tilapia really need these high dietary protein levels?

by Abdel-Fattah M. El-Sayed, professor Oceanography Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Egypt

abdelfatah.youssif@alexu.edu.eg

Tilapia are freshwater cichlid fishes that, while native to Africa, were introduced into many tropical, subtropical and temperate regions of the world during the second half of the 20th century. They are among the most important farmed fishes in the world, second only to carps.


Global tilapia aquaculture has witnessed significant expansion during the past three decades. As a result, the global production of farmed tilapia boosted from 383,654 tonnes in 1990 (2.28 percent of total aquaculture production) to 5,670,981 tonnes in 2015, representing 7.4 percent of global aquaculture (excluding aquatic plants) and 11.63 percent of total finfish aquaculture.
 


Semi-intensive tilapia culture has been adopted in various parts of the world, either in monoculture or polyculture systems. Semi-intensive tilapia culture with other herbivorous/omnivorous fish such, as carps and mullets has seen significant expansion, particularly among small-scale farmers in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Under semi-intensive culture systems, tilapia requires about 25 percent crude protein (cp) or even less. This is because these fish can meet part of their protein requirement from the natural food available in the pond through pond fertilisation. In intensive farming systems, this level might be increased to 28-32 percent during grow out phases.

There has been a rapid, global industrialisation of tilapia production in recent years, accompanied by a gradual shift in tilapia culture from traditional, low-input, semi-intensive systems to more intensive farming practices, with an increasing dependence on formulated feeds. In many regions, this has created a disparity between seed supplies and demand, and a concomitant increase in demand for formulated feed.

In parallel with tilapia culture expansion, tilapia feed industry has witnessed substantial growth during the past three decades. Piles of studies have also been accumulating on the development of commercial, cost effective tilapia feeds and best feed and feeding practices. The accumulated knowledge reveals that tilapia require about 40 percent protein during their early larval stages, reduced to 25-32 percent during pre-grower and grower periods. These levels have been adopted in commercial extruded tilapia feed production worldwide for many years; and still applied in many parts of the world.

However, in recent years, some commercial tilapia feed producers have sharply increased the protein, and sometimes lipid, levels in extruded tilapia feeds, far beyond their reported requirements. I do not know whether this increase is justifiable, despite the sharp increase in the prices of feed ingredient, particularly protein source (fish meal, oil seed meals, animal by-product meals, etc.).

As a result of this increase in protein (and, sometimes, lipid) levels in tilapia feeds, prices of these feeds have sharply increased, particularly in Africa. For example, retail price of tilapia starter feed in Tanzania (> 44% protein) ranged from 1400-2700 USD/tonne in 2017. In Kenya, 57 percent starter tilapia feed (Skretting) costed 4000-4900 USD/tonne in October 2017 (depending on particle size). Retail price of feed crumbles (48% cp) was 3000 USD/ tonne, while the price of grow out feed (35-38% cp) was 1300-1360 USD/tonne. Of course, these prices are extremely high, to the limit that enforced many fish famers in different parts in Africa to abandon fish farming.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Zhengchang company profile



Zhengchang, established in 1918, has made constant innovations in feed machinery industry and accumulated a wealth of experience in tackling the various challenges facing feed companies and, more importantly, is able to offer a range of comprehensive solutions.
Zhengchang has now evolved into China’s largest manufacture of feed machinery and has 16 branches in China with over 1300 staff and more than thirty offices all over the world. 

Zhengchang to date has successfully constructed more than 2000 turnkey projects world around the world, covering fields of poultry and livestock feed, aquatic feed, pet feed, premix feed, sawdust pellet, fertiliser, silo storage, pasture, electrical control and garbage treatment, etc.

Zhengchang projects are designed to deliver to the client higher feed quality, higher overall capacity and more profits. 
Zhengchang have conquered challenges one after another for the customers and accumulated rich experience over the past 90 years.

They are now making great endeavors to apply their latest achievements to feed, pasture, environment protection, fertilizer, sawdust shaping industries.


Zhengchang is more than a professional partner who can provide advanced machinery, technology and management ideas.

It is also a true problem solver who knows you well during your development. Zhengchang is with you every step of the way.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

07/02/2018: Join key aquaculture influencers from around the globe at AgraME 2018

AgraME 2018 is the perfect platform for government officials, leading specialists and industry newcomers from across the globe to get together and discuss food security through aquaculture in the MEA regions.
 


Discussing the aquacultural landscapes in the Middle East, support structures and sustainability, we are bringing high level speakers to the dedicated aquaculture day on 6th March at AgraME.

Conference Schedule 

6th March 2018

- 10:30 Welcome Address from the UAE Ministry of Climate Change and Environment (invited)
- 10:40 Welcome Address from the Ministry of Environment, Water & Agriculture, Saudi Arabia
- 11:10 Aquaculture prospects in the Kingdom Ministry of Environment, Water & Agriculture, Saudi Arabia
- 11:45 Creating an aquaculture sector support structure: The South African case study Khumo Morake, Director of Aquaculture Technical Services, Department of Agriculture, Forestry & Fisheries - South Africa
- 12:25 Development of a sustainable aquaculture industry: The Norwegian story Ole Johan Sandvaer, Regional Director MEA, Innovation Norway
- 13:40 Business opportunities for aquaculture in the Middle East
- 14:20 Solutions to overcome stress in aquaculture Dr Aldelrahman Khattaby, Technical Director, Aller Aqua
- 15:00 Ozone censors and their impact on aquaculture Paw Petersen, Director, OxyGuard International
- 15:50 ROVs vs divers: Capabilities for aquaculture Sam Macdonald, President, Deep Trekker
- 16:30 Technical case study

For more information email info@agramiddleeast.com or call +971 4 336 5161

Book your stand, HERE.
Register to visit, HERE.

Visit the AgraME website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

07/02/2018: Nutriad hosting aquaculture seminar in Myanmar

A global leader in feed additives solutions for aquaculture, Nutriad was thrilled to share its knowledge and experience with a group of industry professionals in Yangon, Myanmar. The highly valued aquaculture event was organised by Tan Sao A Ltd., Nutriad’s distributor for aquaculture products in Vietnam. 

 
Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon
Image credit: Paul Arps on Flickr
(CC BY 2.0)
Mr Allen (Ming-Hsun) Wu, Regional Manager of Nutriad Aqua APAC presented “Global aqua and shrimp culture outlook and Nutriad’s solution”; Dr. Kanjanaworkakul Poonmanee (Fai), Aqua Tech. Manager S.E. Asia of Nutriad presented “Thailand Shrimp Farming practices: facts & figures”. Followed by “Vietnam Shrimp Farming practices: facts & figures” presented by Mr Truong Minh Duc – Vice Director, Tan Sao A Co., Ltd. Dr Kyaw Tun Myat – Chairman, Myanmar Shrimp Association shared interesting insight when he addressed “Myanmar Shrimp Farming practices: facts & figures.”

As Vietnam and Myanmar delegates share common interests and face similar challenges, the interaction was met with great enthusiasm. “This is the most successful aquaculture seminar in Myanmar, as it offers very practical and useful insights. Our association is thankful for the support of an internationally recognised company like Nutriad”, commented Dr Kyaw Tun Myat.

Nutriad has recently obtained promising results against white feces, luminance bacterial of shrimp via the application of its health range of specialty additives in farms and feedmill. In his closing speech Allen Wu recognised Tan Sao A Ltd. for their great efforts in the 13 years partnership and thanked Dr Aong, Multi Aquaculture Aquaculture & Livestock Trading Ent., Ltd., Myanmar for his local support.

Shrimp farm customers in Vietnam have been using Nutriad’s products for many years and are extremely satisfied with the results and performance. Nutriad is committed to continue to innovate its product portfolio, adapting new challenges and emerging diseases like for example EHP.

Find out more on the Nutriad website, HERE

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

07/02/2018: Evonik receives pharmaceutical approvals for hydrogen peroxide for salmon farming

With ASPERIX® Vet Evonik offers an environmentally benign product against sea lice for use in Salmon aquaculture in northern Europe. Evonik has been granted approval (marketing authorisation) for this product for the United Kingdom, Norway and Iceland.

ASPERIX® Vet is manufactured at Evonik’s production site in Antwerp, Belgium. The site obtained the relevant manufacturing authorisation and the GMP license at the end of 2016. Evonik distributes the product exclusively in the above countries via its sales partner Helm Skandinavien AS, who will act as pharmaceutical wholesaler.


 
Image credit: Julia Manzerova on Flickr
(CC BY-NS 2.0)
 
Dr Christoph Batz-Sohn, Marketing Director for aquaculture in Evonik’s Active Oxygens Business Line, explains, “With the distribution of ASPERIX® Vet, the Business Line is taking its first steps in this industry. We are working on additional projects to make our environmentally benign technology usable for aquaculture.” 

Since 2013, Helm has been the market leader in the distribution of chemicals for preservation and further processing of by-products of the fish industry. The infrastructure in the Nordic countries and the logistical capabilities are first-class and make Helm an ideal partner for Evonik. With the addition of ASPERIX® Vet to the range, Helm strengthens the market position further in this continuously growing and important segment.

Lars Storm of Helm Skandinavien says, “Evonik is an ideal partner for us as we can rely on their many years of experience and their reliable supply chain. The new ASPERIX® Vet is an important add-on to the current product portfolio of Helm Skandinavien A/S. With our ties to the Scandinavian fish industry, we are a strong partner in the Northern European business.”

Hydrogen peroxide is used successfully as a parasiticide against sea lice in salmon farming. It is an environmentally benign alternative to special insecticides because, following treatment of the fish, it breaks down completely into water and oxygen. The fish can be harvested directly following treatment and there is absolutely no risk with regard to residues and human consumption.

“With its activity in this sector, Evonik supports the responsibility of the industry with regard to sustainability,” says Susanne Reinhart, general manager Active Oxygens EMEA. “In the effort to feed the growing world population, sustainable aquaculture is becoming increasingly important and it contributes to curbing the wild catch and overfishing of the world’s seas.”

ASPERIX® Vet can be obtained from Helm immediately. It extends Evonik’s portfolio of specialised hydrogen peroxide products, which are marketed in many diverse industries and applications under the brand names HYPROX®, OXTERIL®, PERSYNT® and CLARMARIN®.

Evonik is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of hydrogen peroxide. 13 production sites worldwide and an annual capacity of approx. 950,000 metric tons ensure optimal deliveries of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2).


For more information visit the Evonik website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

07/02/2018: The rise of fumonisins marks global trend as mycotoxin threat shifts

Fumonisins have become more prevalent at higher concentrations in raw commodities and finished feeds in recent years, according to the latest annual BIOMIN Mycotoxin Survey data

“Fumonisins showed the highest percentage increase in global occurrence among the major agriculturally relevant mycotoxins, which include aflatoxins, zearalenone, deoxynivalenol, T-2, fumonisins and ochratoxin A,” observed Ines Taschl, Product Manager for Mycotoxin Risk Management at BIOMIN.
 


In 2017, 69 percent of samples analysed tested positive for fumonisins, up from 61 percent the year prior.

Fumonisins, which are produced by Fusarium proliferatum and F. verticilloides, predominantly contaminate corn (maize), corn by-products and soy. They constitute the second most commonly found mycotoxin: deoxynivalenol, also known as vomitoxin, consistently ranks as the most common mycotoxin globally.
 


Fumonisin trend in all regions 
“The shift in the composition of the mycotoxin threat is noticeable when comparing data sets over the years, and the trend towards higher fumonisins levels globally can be observed in every region,” stated Ms Taschl.

Regional examples of fumonisins on the rise: 
• In North America, 46 percent of samples analysed tested positive for fumonisins at an average concentration of 2187 parts per billion (ppb) in 2016, reaching 52 percent of samples at an average of 2441 ppb in 2017.
• 97 percent of corn samples in Asia Pacific tested positive for fumonisins.
• In Argentina, the average concentration of fumonisins rose from 1808 ppb in 2016 to 2800 ppb in 2017.
• The prevalence of fumonisins in Central Europe has increased steadily since 2015.

“While fumonisins are typically found in warmer climates, they have been recorded at greater frequency in more moderate zones,” she explained.

The maximum value registered for fumonisins was 290517 ppb, sourced from a finished feed sample in the United States.

About the survey 
The annual BIOMIN Mycotoxin Survey constitutes the longest running and most comprehensive survey of its kind. The survey results provide insights on the incidence of the six major mycotoxins in the agricultural commodities used for livestock feed in order to identify the potential risk posed to livestock animal production.



Live webinar and survey results 
On 14 February 2018, BIOMIN and Romer Labs will host a live webinar on the rise of fumonisins, detection methods and the latest annual results of the BIOMIN Mycotoxin Survey. 

Two online sessions are offered in order to facilitate participation from various time zones, and the webinar is free to attend. Webinar attendees will be the first to receive the 2017 BIOMIN Mycotoxin Survey report. 


Online registration is required on the Biomin website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

07/02/2018: Breeding diversity into the future of aquaculture

by Peter Bickerton, Scientific Communications & Outreach Manager, Earlham Institute

Aquaculture is expanding, especially in areas of sub-Saharan Africa that are home to stunning native biodiversity. How can research in genomics help us to increase socioeconomic output while protecting local ecosystems?

  


The livelihood of a staggering eight percent of the world’s population relies on fish, a resource that we have overexploited in the seas so much so that many fish stocks are expected to collapse entirely in the not-so-distant future. This situation is as unsustainable for the oceans as it is for people (the average person worldwide now consumes over 20kg of fish per year), with entire ecosystems and a way of life for hundreds of millions under threat from overfishing. However, fish is a nutritious and protein-rich food source with many clear health benefits, not to mention the positive socio-economic impact for millions of people worldwide. 

Thus, fish farming is becoming more and more widespread, not just on the coast but inland, too. However, with the drive towards aquaculture accelerating throughout sub-Saharan Africa, it is important that we ensure best practice and environmental sustainability long before the damage is done. What has spelt ruin for our oceans cannot happen in our freshwater systems, too. On the one hand, it is important that we produce fish requiring sustainable levels of feed, giving a positive growth ratio and economic benefit. At the same time, we must ensure that breeding programs are well managed, and that we ensure our freshwater ecosystems are not threatened by non-native, invasive species.

The African Great Lakes and river systems are a great example of some of the scientific and conservation efforts that are underway, which aim to increase the output and efficiency of aquaculture, while preserving some of the exquisite biodiversity already present in the lakes and rivers - especially among native fish.

There is also a great deal that we can add to scientific knowledge in the process.

Genomics for a more resilient food system
As with medicine, the same stands for our ecosystems: prevention is better than the cure.

Alas, along with the clear benefits of large scale farming, including greater productivity, better yields and reduced global malnutrition, we are also witnessing tremendous problems when it comes to the environment. Vast monocultures of crops leave little room for wildlife, other than the pests that we manage with insecticides, herbicides and fungicides, which reduce the loss of valuable food but also mean that wild insect numbers are on the decline, if not plummeting.

Our landscapes have been so manipulated by agriculture that formerly native ecosystems resemble nothing of the sort. Only now are we starting to appreciate what biodiversity brings us, not just in terms of maintaining a savoury environment, which our children and grandchildren might inherit, but also as a vital lifeline for the very crops that we require to feed a throbbing global population.


Read the full article, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Leiber company profile


Now with more than 140 employees, with each one a specialist in his or her domain, Leiber has a well-proven team in a company following a clear strategy for more than 50 years: working with values.

“What makes us unique? We focus on what we know best. Yeast. Production on the highest level of quality. Latest technology. New findings from science and research. The performance of a team of specialists. 

This is what defines Leiber´s strategic orientation. This is what makes us truly entrepreneurial”, as explained on the Leiber website.

“The markets´ requirements are changing - we are able to follow. This is how we became one of the leading manufacturers of specialised yeast products”.

Visit the website HERE.





 The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Sunday, February 4, 2018

05/02/2018: Salmon producer delivers £100m boost to Scottish suppliers and communities

Minister for the Rural Economy and Connectivity, Fergus Ewing MSP, has welcomed new figures showing that Scottish Sea Farms, one of the country’s leading producers of responsibly farmed salmon, achieved record spend with local suppliers in 2017

The figures reveal that Scottish Sea Farms, which operates 46 farm sites, two processing plants and employs 449 people, spent over £100m – 85 percent of total supplier spend – procuring goods and services from local businesses in 2017, many of them small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).
 

Triton pens at Fusion Marine
Image credit: Fusion Marine / Scottish Sea Farms

This is up £13.9m on 2016 and is driven by a long-standing company policy to ‘buy Scottish’ wherever possible.

Scottish Sea Farms’ Managing Director, Jim Gallagher explains, “The communities in which we farm are integral to our success, from their natural resources to their local workforces and businesses. It seems only fitting therefore that these same communities should derive maximum value in return; something we are proud to have grown again in 2017 – and will strive to continue growing in 2018 and beyond.”

The figures also show that Scottish Sea Farms:
• Procured goods and services from 709 local suppliers across Scotland
• Invested most on feed, nutrition and ensuring optimum fish health, followed by construction of an innovative new freshwater facility at Barcaldine, near Oban
• Achieved an average spend of £141,474 per Scottish-based supplier

The news comes on the back of the recent Scottish Salmon Farming Economic Report, commissioned by the Scottish Salmon Producer’s Organisation, which highlighted that the sector contributes £558m to the national economy in GVA and spends a total of £390m on local suppliers and services.

Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing commented saying, “These figures show the scale of the support that Scottish aquaculture provides for rural businesses, protecting and creating jobs, and supporting communities. The support they offer for research and innovation is also invaluable in ensuring the long-term future of the industry. I fully support Scottish Sea Farms’ ethos of supporting local suppliers and this is something that I encourage right across our food and drink sector.”

One such local supplier is Gael Force, headquartered in Inverness, which saw an increase in turnover of close to 45 percent in 2017 and added 50 new jobs.

Stewart Graham, Managing Director, said, “Almost all of this growth can be attributed to orders from the aquaculture industry. It’s the ongoing support of companies such as Scottish Sea Farms that has propelled us on to develop new innovative technologies and services – something we will continue to do in 2018 with a planned £1m investment in increased capacity and the development of new products.”

It’s not just companies located in the aquaculture heartland of the Highlands and Islands that are feeling the benefit of Scottish Sea Farms’ ‘buy Scottish’ procurement policy. So too are companies the length and breadth of Scotland: from Shetland and Orkney in the north, to Ayrshire in the south west; and from Aberdeen in the east to Mull on the west coast.

Jim Traynor, Chairman of net manufacturers W&J Knox in Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, said, “Few people would connect Ayrshire with aquaculture, yet the positive impact of the industry is keenly felt, with Scottish Sea Farms’ contracts helping protect 63 jobs in an area of otherwise high unemployment – not forgetting the onward spend within the local community.”

Indeed, it’s anticipated that the end benefit to Scotland will be well in excess of Scottish Sea Farms’ £100m direct spend, with many suppliers going on to spend with other businesses local to them.

Iain Forbes, Director of Fusion Marine, near Oban, which recently received a £1m order from Scottish Sea Farms for new fish farm pens, said, “Hauliers, B&Bs, ferry travel, generators, welfare units and sundries – each and every pen we install for Scottish Sea Farms generates business both for the area local to us and the remote communities in which we work. Often, this is for months at a time during winter when revenue from tourism is traditionally lower.”


Read the news story on the Scottish Sea Farms website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news