Sunday, November 18, 2018

Seaweeds: A multi-purposed bioresource well-suited for Integrated Sequential BioRefinery (ISBR) processing

by Dr Thierry Chopin

For the last six decades, westerners have been eating/using seaweeds without really knowing it because it has been through extracts known as phycocolloids – the gelling, thickening, emulsifying, binding, stabilising, clarifying and protecting agents known as carrageenans and agars (extracted from red seaweeds) and alginates (extracted from brown seaweeds) – used in the food, brewing, textile, pharmaceutical, biotechnological, coating, drilling, etc industries.
 


Why is your ice cream smooth and not full of big ice crystals? It contains carrageenans! The cocoa powder of your chocolate dairy drink is not all at the bottom of the bottle and you believe the product has not been on the shelf long: the microscopic carrageenan mesh did it again! Green olives with pimento strips inserted in the pit hole? Sorry, these strips are made of a carrageenan paste with a colourant and antioxidant (asthaxanthin from microalgae) and two drops of artificial pimento flavour! For fast relief of heartburn, you can take alginate tablets or liquids, which block acid reflux from your stomach. Some breweries have a clarifying step for your beer that involves the red seaweed called Irish moss.

Fine printing on textile/silk is only possible if the material has been soaked in a carrageenan or alginate solution, which will then keep the dye in place. All the DNA analyses used to identify who did the crime on the CSI television series: banding patterns on agar gels! How is the gyprock in your garage flame-retardant certified? It is coated with alginates. Wonder why the water does not go through the paper goblets of your water fountain at work? They are coated with carrageenans. Underground drilling is quite tough on bits; they need to be cooled down with alginate mud.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Liptosa company profile

  
LípidosToledo SA began in 1996 as a family business and under the guidance of a group of professionals with extensive experience in the Animal Nutrition field. 

From the outset, the company's mission has been to provide its clients with personalised service and efficient, natural products that are able to meet the demands of the sector.

In 2000 Lípidos Toledo SA moved its facilities, building a modern manufacturing plant in Talavera de la Reina (Toledo, Spain). In 2012 it acquired a new industrial warehouse in the vicinity of the main facilities where the manufacturing of the powder additives takes place and a third storage warehouse.

With these new facilities Lípidos Toledo SA is able to have separate manufacturing lines for the different products they manufacture, avoiding the risk of cross contamination.

Furthermore, the new facilities enable the company to manufacture products with fishmeal derivatives, allowing the company further expansion, mainly in the aquaculture range.

The facilities allow the manufacture of nutritional products, liquid and powder based phytobiotic additives, nutraceutical products and nutritional and specialty products without any risk of the products becoming cross contaminated.

In 2010, Lípidos Toledo SA acquired a large office space at C/ San Romualdo 12-14 in Madrid, Spain where all logistics work is carried out. This enables Lípidos Toledo SA to fulfil its objective of manufacturing products of the highest quality and providing its clients the best service.


Visit the Liptoaqua website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Do not fool yourself!

by Sven-Olof Malmqvist

Just arrived back from China and made some reflections. The cuisine they have in Eastern China, or at least in Nanjing, the capital of the Jiangsu province, is very fresh and tasty, much better than in many other places in China.
The Moutai, the distilled Chinese liquor produced from fermented sorghum, can taste very different depending on the brand. Another note in my book is the number of people, even in a remote city, is massive. When taking the high-speed train from Shanghai to Nanjing I asked someone about the population and the reply was that it is not a big city, just seven to eight million people.
 



In Sweden we have a total number of nine million, so you understand where I am coming from! Walking around in these cities feels quite safe even during the evening/night but one thing you have to be observe is the silent electrical vehicles suddenly turning up behind you.

I´d really like to have a couple of those at my farm, very practical ones, worked like small trucks. Another fancy one I saw, in an office, was very tiny and could be folded and carried on the train and onto other mean of transportation.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

IFIF and FAO strengthen collaboration on critical issues at 17th annual meeting

The International Feed Industry Federation (IFIF) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) held their 17th annual meeting at FAO Headquarters on 8 – 9th November 2018 to further strengthen their collaboration on critical issues to ensure safe, nutritious and sustainable feed and food.

Mr Bukar Tijani, FAO Assistant Director-General for Agriculture and Consumer Protection, welcomed delegates and highlighted the importance of private partnerships to support the FAO goals to the IFIF delegates representing over 80 percent of global compound feed production.
 
Image credit: IFIF

The meeting was officially opened by Dr Berhe G. Tekola, Director of the FAO Animal Production and Health Division and Dr Daniel Bercovici, IFIF Chairman, who welcomed delegates and reiterated their commitment to this longstanding partnership and agreed to continue to strengthen their work together to tackle the challenges facing the feed and food chain.

Mr Bercovici said, "our joint meeting with the FAO once again underlined our strong partnership and IFIF is committed to continue to support the FAO initiatives on capacity development for feed safety, the Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock and LEAP, as well joint efforts on feed and food safety at the Codex Alimentarius. IFIF looks forward to our upcoming 6th Global Feed & Food Congress and 12th International Feed Regulators Meeting (IFRM) in Bangkok on 11 – 14th March 2019, which is another great example of IFIF FAO collaboration positively impacting the feed and food chain."

Mr Bercovici added that, "together with the dedicated colleagues at the FAO we contribute to building a solid science-based approach to support safe and sustainable animal nutrition to bring quality and affordable food to a growing world population, producing more with less and even better under diverse production systems. The high quality of exchanges and cooperation towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) continue to build on our achievements and together with all IFIF members I am pleased our relationship continues to strengthen year to year."

Daniela Battaglia, Animal Production Officer at the Animal Production and Health Division of the FAO, said, "FAO and IFIF have a long standing partnership and this meeting addressed a number of critical issues of common interest, such as the need for capacity development to ensure feed safety and the importance of collaborating to tackle the containment of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). FAO is committed to work with the private sector and the feed operators and believes that they can valuably contribute to make the livestock and food sectors more responsible and sustainable to achieve important goals such as public health, and animal health and welfare."

Visit the IFIF website, HERE.
Visit the FAO website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Scottish Sea Farms to receive £1.28 million in R&D support to accelerate innovation

Scottish Sea Farms is to receive £1.28 million in R&D support from Scottish Enterprise towards its pioneering work to further enhance fish welfare and go beyond compliance with regards to protecting the environment.

The funds will assist Scottish Sea Farms in its latest R&D drive – worth a total of £18.3 million – helping to accelerate both the innovative work itself and the anticipated benefits.
 
MD Jim Gallagher and Kate Forbes MSP
Image credit: Scottish Sea Farms

The R&D spans five key areas:
• Establishing the conditions for optimum fish health and welfare at Scottish Sea Farms' new £48m RAS hatchery at Barcaldine in Argyll, set to open in 2019
• Developing humane slaughter processes at the company's processing facilities in Oban and at Scalloway on Shetland
• Harvesting wind and wave energy at more exposed farms to reduce reliance on fuel
• Recycling a greater proportion of by-products to minimise waste
• Capturing and analysing data in the ongoing drive to increase knowledge and understanding.

The investment was welcomed by Minister for Public Finance and Digital Economy Kate Forbes MSP during a visit to the new hatchery. She said, "Scotland has a thriving food and drink sector with salmon exports alone growing by 35 percent during 2017, recognising the global reputation for our quality produce. Ensuring that the sector grows in a sustainable way remains a priority for us. It is great to see an ambitious and respected company like Scottish Sea Farms investing in innovation to improve environmental control, health issues and production efficiencies. I'd like to congratulate the company on raising the bar, and wish them every success on their sustainable growth journey."

Kirsteen Binnie, who leads Scottish Enterprise's engagement with the salmon farmer, added, "Scottish Sea Farms is already a national success story, employing more than 430 people across the country. Its hunger to farm evermore responsibly is driving forward this latest project – the first of its kind in the sector – which will not only create a state-of-the-art new hatchery in Barcaldine and create new jobs in Scotland, but also reinforces our strong, innovative and forward-thinking food and drink sector. We have worked intensively with the company since 2010, helping it deliver innovation, business improvements and international activity. During this time, we"ve seen it grow to become the second largest salmon producer in the UK. With this latest support, Scottish Sea Farms can continue to go from strength to strength and deliver its future ambition."

Scottish Sea Farms' Managing Director, Jim Gallagher commented, "Researching and developing new approaches and technologies is key to ensuring that we continue raising the healthiest fish in the most responsible but also the most environmentally sustainable way, and this latest £18.3 million investment aims to advance our work in both areas. The £1.28 million support from Scottish Enterprise means that we will be able to do more of this planned R&D even sooner, accelerating both the innovation and the anticipated benefits for fish health and welfare and for the environment."

Working closely with Scottish Enterprise and Scottish Sea Farms to deliver this project, Highlands and Islands Enterprise area manager for Argyll and the Islands, Jennifer Nicoll said, "We very much welcome this considerable inward investment project to our region and the jobs it will create. Aquaculture is a major employer in Scotland and of growing significance, particularly in rural areas where it supports local economies and community resilience. The R&D work at the new hatchery will complement Oban's status as a university town, and the commercial, research and educational activities at the nearby European Marine Science Park at Dunstaffnage. There will also be wider benefits across the region, as Scottish Sea Farms has operations up the west coast and in Orkney and Shetland. We look forward to working with the company as the new facility takes shape."

For more information visit the Scottish Sea Farms website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Leiber company profile


Now with more than 140 employees, with each one a specialist in his or her domain, Leiber has a well-proven team in a company following a clear strategy for more than 50 years: working with values.

“What makes us unique? We focus on what we know best. Yeast. Production on the highest level of quality. Latest technology. New findings from science and research. The performance of a team of specialists. 

This is what defines Leiber´s strategic orientation. This is what makes us truly entrepreneurial”, as explained on the Leiber website.

“The markets´ requirements are changing - we are able to follow. This is how we became one of the leading manufacturers of specialised yeast products”.

Visit the website HERE.





 The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

The crucial future of fishmeal

by Dr Neil Auchterlonie, Technical Director, IFFO


Attending the GAA’s GOAL conference in Guayaquil, Ecuador, recently, brought back into focus the large amount of effort that is being put into the promotion of novel ingredients for aquafeeds, largely at the expense of the materials that have supported the development of the sector, i.e. fishmeal and fish oil.
 

There is a lot of excitement in conferences such as the GAA’s GOAL event, about some of these possible new ingredients, with liberal use of the word “innovation” in the discussions.

IFFO’s position on the novel ingredients sector is clear. IFFO recognises the need for more volume of ingredients to meet the growing requirement for more aquafeed, in turn to support additional aquaculture production. With an annual finite supply of approximately five million tonnes of fishmeal, and a little under one million tonnes of fish oil, growth will not come in the production of these ingredients to any marked degree.

Although, as a side note, it is interesting to note that there are still opportunities for the collection of more processing byproduct material from fisheries, and that with the development of aquaculture there will be more raw material available through that sector as well. No, the production of fishmeal and fish oil is unlikely to change significantly over time, and the feed industry will have to look to some of these other ingredients to make up the shortfall in volume that is a reality of the situation.

In all this it is, however, important to realise that fishmeal and fish oil will continue to be the foundation for future aquafeeds, despite the communications to the contrary. Consistent use of the term “replacement” does nothing to help this message, and it is revealing that in private many of the contacts in these companies agree that the reality is “supplementation” of fishmeal and fish oil rather than replacement, but that message seems to change a little in the public arena. There are very good reasons why fishmeal and fish oil importance will be maintained or even enhanced, all related to the nutritional values and contributions made by fishmeal and fish oil.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Andritz company profile


ANDRITZ is a globally leading supplier of plants, equipment, and services for hydropower stations, the pulp and paper industry, the metalworking and steel industries, and for solid/liquid separation in the municipal and industrial sectors.

The publicly listed technology Group is headquartered in Graz, Austria, and has a staff of almost 25,000 employees. ANDRITZ operates over 250 sites worldwide.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

When will we stop being the copier of the national agenda?

by Antonio Garza de Yta

About a month ago, I was dining at La Pesca, Tamaulipas with the friend of all the sport fishermen of Latin America, Mr Pedro Sors, who told me an allegory that I found very interesting and that I would like to share with you.
 

A man inherits a company and then he arrives like everybody else, with a lot of worries and pressures. A friend, relatively close, comes and asks him something.

"Hey, friend, now that you take this new position with a lot of responsibility, do you think I could support you by managing the company's copier?"

"The copier of the company?" replied the second.

"Do I have a copier?"

"Yes, notice that within your company there is a copier that does not generate much profit, but that caters to a lot of people, and that I, although I do not know anything about it, can manage it. Nobody has ever treated it as it should, but I promise you it will not give you problems."

"Go ahead, as long as you do not cause me trouble in the company"

And so, the person who does not know anything about copies starts to take over the copier within the new administration of the company, taking care not to grow too much so that the business is not attractive to anyone closer to the owner and avoiding any problem that this generates, although it is necessary to confront it so that the activity develops.

The country's aquaculture and fisheries sector has been the copier of the national agenda for too long. We have had managers who either have not known anything about the issue or have not fought for the sector of aquaculture as it should be, for being afraid of losing their job.

When will we stop being the copier? When will the aquaculture it deserves be given relevance? When will it be understood that not only is it the most nutritious and sustainable source of animal protein in the world, but it is also the only one that can still grow and develop to feed the growing world and national population?

When will it be seen as a tool not only to achieve food security, but also to generate wealth? When will we have someone who is a true professional of the sector, with vision, with experience, and with proven results at the helm of the activity? When will we see all the potential we have and bet on developing it? When? If today, we live a true transformation ... I hope it is immediately.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

PCE company profile

Pelleting Consumables Europe (PCE) is a global supplier of tailor-made, high-grade precision ring dies and roller shells.
Thanks to years of experience in the pelleting industry they can provide their customers expert advice on the geometry and design of Ring Dies and Roller Shells.

Manufacturing reliable ring dies and roller shells for compound feed, biofuel and recycling industries and a wide range of other applications.

Their tailor-made Ring Dies and Roller shells are available for pellet presses of all brands and are manufactured at their ultra-modern manufacturing facility.

As the entire process takes place In-house, they can guarantee short lead times and optimum quality.

PCE ring dies and roller shells are made of high-quality steel. The Ring Dies are manufactured as standard from high-grade, high chrome steel X46Cr13, tempered to 53-55 HRC.

The associated Roller Shells are manufactured from 100Cr6 or 20MnCr5, depending on specific application.

According to the PCE website, “our company is continuously focussed on improving the life cycle of our products and to increase profits for our customers.”

PCE key features: 
- Longer life cycle
- Higher capacity
- Low power consumption

In addition to their products they also assist with the planning of your spare and wear part inventory.

A team of experts is available to guide you by selecting the right ring dies, roller shells and to set up a service level spare part management program.

PCE is your partner for just perfect ring dies and roller shells.

Visit the PCE website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Monday, November 12, 2018

US soybean supports sustainable aquaculture globally

by US Soybean Export Council

For the past 30 years, the International Soy in Aquaculture Program of the US Soybean Export Council has been working to increase the utilisation of soy products in farmed fish feed.

Initially, the program focused on transitioning Chinese aquaculture from manure-based to soy-based formulated feeds to improve product quality and lessen environmental impact. As the young aquaculture industry grew, the program's focus expanded to include other global regions and farmed species.

The industry recognised that in order for it to fully develop and grow, it was imperative to replace the key feed ingredients of fishmeal and fish oil from wild-caught sources with more sustainable, scalable and affordable alternatives.
 
Image credit: Dave Shaver on Flickr
(CC BY 2.0)

In the past 15 years, soy has emerged as the most widely used alternative protein to fishmeal in farmed fish diets, due in no small part to the US soy industry's support for feed formulation research, education and training efforts. Soy's complete nutritional and amino acid profile works well in aquaculture feeds, and the use of advanced soy products have overcome digestibility issues for carnivorous fish species.

For many of the most popular farmed species worldwide, such as shrimp, salmon and tilapia, this has allowed a drastic reduction in the amount of fishmeal and fish oil from wild-caught sources. This reduction has allowed the more selective use of that limited resource for specific stages of production such as hatchery, broodstock and finishing diets. The end result of these improved diets is a more sustainable global aquaculture industry.

The latest United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation State of the World Fisheries and Aquaculture Report, issued this summer, notes just how far the industry has progressed in terms of its overall sustainability. The report notes that fishmeal inclusion rates in Atlantic salmon diets have decreased from 65 percent in 1990 to 19 percent in 2013. Food conversion ratios for global aquaculture in general have decreased from around 3:1 (three pounds of feed for one pound of farmed fish) to 1.3:1 over the past 25 years, largely due to better feed formulations, feed manufacturing methods and on-farm feed management.

These improvements in feed conversion ratios, reduction of fishmeal and fish oil from wild caught sources, and technological advances have resulted in aquaculture now being recognised as having the least environmental impact of any other form of protein production.

The global aquaculture industry's continued drive to improve sustainability bodes well for US soy, as aquaculture continues to be the fastest growing food production sector. The FAO report notes that in 2016, the share of aquaculture products in total food fish consumption was 53 percent, as compared to 41 percent in 2006.

Global aquaculture production in 2016 included 80 million metric tons of food fish, and that number is projected to grow by 37 percent by 2030. With sustainable, scalable US soy as a key feed ingredient, and the visionary support of US soybean farmers, the global aquaculture industry will be able to scale up to meet increasing demand for healthful farmed seafood worldwide.

For more information visit the US Soybean Export Council website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Space 2018: An event to remember

by Matt Holmes, Feature editor, International Aquafeed

Thousands of visitors attended the 32nd annual Space exhibition in Rennes, France, to discover the latest in innovation from the world’s aquaculture sector in 11 specially constructed halls. The exhibition took place between September 11 – 14 and attracted more than 50 foreign journalists as well as plenty from France.

The event is organised by Anne Marie Quemener who has a long association with Space. Anne Marie succeeded Paul Kerdraon on January 1, 2016 as exhibition manager of Space.
 


Marie says, “we can all be proud of this 32nd edition of Space. Despite a highly competitive context, the whole world is here in Rennes to be inspired by the Breton farming model recognised for its performance and quality.

“A great result. I once again express my thanks to the exhibitors who contribute so much to our success by the enormous quality of their stands and their willingness to make Space a major event. The numerous innovations presented allow visitors to get a foretaste of tomorrow's solutions. This energy and drive have been reinforced over the four days of the show by its collective nature, the strongest possible demonstration that the different links in the chain of producers, associations, food industry and distributors must work hand in hand to build an ever more competitive agriculture.”

The Perendale Extrusion Course
Space 2018 began with a special one-day conference organised by Perendale Publishers about the importance of extrusion. It was attended by over 30 delegates from animal feed producers to Nigerian Tilapia and Catfish farmers.

The one-day short course was designed specially for aquafeed processing professionals and began with an introduction by International Aquafeed’s Circulation and Events Manager, Tuti Tan.

Tuti gave an impassioned speech about the importance of aquaculture and how fish will replace meat as the protein of choice for the consumer. She introduced world renowned extrusion expert Dr Mian Riaz from Texas A&M University who gave a fascinating insight into extrusion and how it can be low cost yet still effective. He started by explaining about the differences between single and twin screw extrusion before fielding many questions from the delegation about extrusion in developing countries.

Tim Hartter, of Corporate Project Service, a division of Wenger, gave a talk about the benefits of proper planning when it comes to building extrusion plant and the importance of separating functions within the plant – so called hygienic zoning.

Mr Hartter has over 43 years of experience in the extrusion industry and was lead designer for Wenger’s twin screw extruder. He is certified Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) and has worked with various agencies and universities to validate the extrusion process as a viable preventive control step for pathogens.

Alain Brisset, of Clextral, who sponsored the conference, spoke about twin screw extruders which Clextral specialise in, and the fact that 30 to 40 million tonnes of compound feeds is currently necessary for the fish industry.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Almex company profile




Almex specialises in single screw extrusion equipment, from the extrusion unit to complete installations. They are a family owned, independent company.

Almex extruders and Contivar Expanders are in use worldwide for fishfeed, oil extraction, petfood, animalfeed plants, the food industry and the processing and chemical industries. Almex started early 1970's with repair and installation of extruders.

For use in Europe these units needed much modifications, so they decided to design and built in the Netherlands a complete range of extruders for 500 to 15.000 kg/hour capacity.

These extruders did find their way to clients worldwide. Today the largest extruder has a diameter of 400 mm, a barrel length of 4800 mm and a drive of 500 kW.

Visit the Almex website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Sunday, November 11, 2018

World Aquaculture Society's Africa Chapter sponsered by Aller Aqua

On November 7, 2018, the World Aquaculture Society (WAS) announced all requirements for formation of the African Chapter have been completed. The WAS Board voted the African Chapter into official status.

According to Maria Celia Portella, President, World Aquaculture Society, "This result follows much hard work by many people and organisations after the African Chapter concept developed initial momentum during World Aquaculture 2017 in Cape Town, South Africa. The African Chapter will quickly develop its official organisation structure and begin to operate throughout the whole of the African continent."
 
Image credit: Aller Aqua

The initial operation will be guided by the interim Board of Directors:
- The Interim Board President is Dr Sherif Sadek from Egypt
- Dr John Walakira from Uganda is the Interim President Elect
- Dr Flower Msuya from Tanzania is the Interim Treasurer
- Zukiswa Nkhereanye is the Interim Secretary
- Blessing Mapfumo is the AC Secretariat

Khalid Salie, Fatima Samodien and Zukiswa Nkhereanye served on the AC Steering Committee and worked closely with many others to put together the bylaws and petition to form the Chapter.

"A very import part of the future success of the African Chapter is the belief and support of Aller Aqua for the African Chapter. Aller Aqua has agreed to support the African Chapter, World Aquaculture Society (WAS) as a founding gold sponsor, thereby contributing to the activities of the Chapter and Society, and specifically to the development of its World Aquaculture activities in the African region for a period of three years," said Ms Potella.

Aller Aqua will sponsor the Chapter activities as well as future workshops and meetings.

"It is important for us to continue to have a positive impact on aquaculture globally. Aquaculture is experiencing significant growth, particularly in Africa, and it is vital to support initiatives which help ensure that growth of aquaculture is facilitated all over Africa. This is done through research as well as sharing knowledge. Besides our own activities, we can help achieve this through our support of the WAS African Chapter and their efforts. I am pleased that WAS have chosen to focus on aquaculture in Africa and through the African Chapter recognise the large diversity on the continent. We experience it when meeting with customers from the various African countries," explained Niels Lundgaard, Aller Aqua"s Commercial Director for Africa.

The African Chapter has begun participating in other African aquaculture events and will begin planning workshops and meetings organized by the African Chapter.

For more information contact Blessing Mapfumo on africanchapter@was.org

Visit the Aller Aqua website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

International Aquafeed Guest Editor – Dr Kangsen Mai

by Dr Kangsen Mai, Chinese International Editor, International Aquafeed

As we all know, 2018 is a very unusual year. Breaking news continues to shock us from around the world, and this is especially true in aquaculture.

AQUA 2018 of WAS took place from August 25-29 in the beautiful French city of Montpellier. The conference not only demonstrated the achievements of the rapid development of global aquaculture and related industries, but also exposed the tremendous challenges facing the industry: the problems of quality, safety and sustainable development.
 

As the most important aquaculture country in the world, China is facing unprecedented challenges. In fact, China's problem of aquaculture is the epitome of aquaculture's problems in all developing countries. In 2018, China's aquaculture administration departments, universities, research institutes, industry associations and enterprises held more than 100 symposiums, workshops and industry development forums to study and discuss the challenges and opportunities of aquaculture in China, and to find new ways for the healthy and sustainable development of aquaculture in China to flourish.

In 2018, there are two main forces driving the transformation, upgrading and innovative development of aquaculture in China: unprecedented environmental storms and the unprecedented Sino-US trade war. China's most stringent environmental protection law and food safety law put forward higher requirements for the safety of aquaculture products and the sustainable use of aquaculture environment.

The Sino US trade war has greatly pushed up the price of feed ingredients, thus significantly raising the cost of farming. Therefore, it is necessary to study more accurate feed formulation, more scientific feed processing technology, and greatly improve feed efficiency.

Looking back over the past four decades, it can be seen that aquaculture in China had the same developmental characteristics as other industries in China: extensive consumption of natural resources, extensive expansion of scale, one-sided pursuit of high yield, insufficient attention to quality and safety, and lack of concern for environmental protection and sustainability. Now the Chinese have realised that this developmental model will inevitably pay a heavy price and is unsustainable.


Read the full article in the International Aquafeed magazine online, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Ottevanger Milling Engineers company profile



Ottevanger Milling Engineers is a leading European company in the design and manufacture of equipment and complete installations for the grain-processing and mixed-feed industries.

Food producers throughout the world use these installations to produce food for people and animals. In modern, well-equipped plants in Aalten and Moerkapelle (The Netherlands) Ottevanger's specialists use the latest technologies to design and manufacture a comprehensive range of products.

Computer-controlled plants – anywhere in the world – are provided with on-line technical support from these plants. In its design of any installation Ottevanger takes into account the strictest environmental regulations and safety requirements.

There are, for example, always adequate facilities for air purification as well as sound and heat insulation. A lot of attention is also devoted to hygiene through the use of stainless steel and special coatings.

Thanks to its expert knowledge and expertise, amassed throughout its over one hundred years' experience, Ottevanger is the ideal partner for the implementation of your project.

Visit the Ottevanger website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Intensive Pond Aquaculture in China

By Feng Ming-Wei, Wu Qiang-Liang, Dong Qiufen, Zhang Song

Intensive Pond Aquaculture (IPA) is a new high-intensive and high-density farming system in China with outstanding advantages and a high construction investment. In this system, water-pushing appliances are put in front of the cell to make static pond water flow through the cell, letting feed waste and fecal matter deposit at the quiescent zone. This is a sustainable farming way which is good for the water recycle, waste clean and aquaculture environment.

 


IPA is mainly composed of the pond, a raceway, water-pushing appliances, waste-removal devices, aeration devices, and other parts. Mostly the cells are set up at one side of the pond and consist of three parts, including the water-pushing cell, culture cell and waste-collection cell.

Generally, the culture cell is 22 metres long, five metres wide and two metres high. The height can be adjusted according to the pond water depth. Micropore oxygen aeration devices are installed at the sides and bottom of this cell to match with the high requirement of dissolved oxygen (DO).

The water-pushing cell is approximately two metres long and the same height and width as the culture cell. The bottom of water-pushing cell is covered by concrete in order to prevent the bottom soil from being sucked up by strong force of water-pushing appliance.

The waste-collection cell is four metres long and constructed at the downstream end of the culture cell with a v-shaped bottom design to slow down the water flow speed and let solid waste to settle down in a so-called quiescent zone. The waste mainly includes feed residual and fecal matter that is sucked up from the bottom, to the pond side and processed after collection.

The water-pushing appliance in front of the culture cell must run continuously to keep the pond water flowing properly, while the micropore oxygen aeration devices that are installed at the sides and bottom of the cell working at the same time to maintain a relatively high DO. Depending upon the culture species and feed type fed into the system, after feeding half an hour the suction devices at the bottom of the waste-collection cell will start working to remove the fecal matter, thus to maintain relative clean water conditions.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wenger company profile



From small-town entrepreneur to worldwide leader. With a little ingenuity and a lot of hard work, brothers Joe and Louis Wenger founded Wenger Mixing Company in a small Kansas (USA) town in 1935. They went on to design a machine that blended molasses with dry feedstuffs and produced pellets in 1948.

Theirs was the first extrusion cooking system and the basic technology for all commercial extruders used today.  The Wenger brothers' novel idea created a worldwide industry. And, seventy-five years later, Wenger Manufacturing, Inc. is still a family-owned business committed to groundbreaking innovation in the extrusion market.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by 
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Clewer Aquaculture presents new patented RBBR-technology

By Clewer, Finland

The Clewer rotating bed bioreactor (RBBR) is the basis of the Clewer Aquaculture RAS system.

It was first developed as wastewater treatment plant for cleaning domestic wastewater fifteen years ago. Later it was used in car wash plants, where water consumption can be reduced by up to 10 percent, compared with conventional car washes. In both wastewater treatment and car wash plants, these reactors have been widely used around the world, from desert to urban environments. In aquaculture these bioreactors have been involved in large-scale testing for seven years. All these three product lines are now part of the Clewer companies, which belong to Salmela Group of companies in Finland.
 


The recycling system for aquaculture has been tested with several species and growing temperatures in our commercial scale RAS-system of our R&D unit. Carefully managed practical culture tests with rainbow trout (temperature 16°C), pikeperch (21°C) and African catfish (26°C) are the basis for sizing the systems. The knowledge for these tests is based on the long history our personnel has in aquaculture. Since the 1980s we have been involved in practical fish farming, consulting and teaching. After seven years of testing, RBBR is now ready and new, efficient and maintenance-free bioreactors will soon be installed for commercial aquaculture use.

The main principle in the development work of the RAS system by Clewer has been to design a system as easy to use and as maintenance-free as possible. Minimising running costs is also a key issue for us. It is possible to make the installation completely on top of the floor. The bioreactor doesn’t need a pressure inside and the head loss is low. We oxygenate the water in the system using a semi-low head oxygenator to optimise the cost of the gas treatment in the system. Effectivity and economy are comparable to the other best comparable ways, and have been used for years in practice. Another practical and cost-effective factor is that transportation of the biofilter by road is possible without the need for any special arrangements.


Read more HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Bühler company profile




There are plenty of good reasons for Bühler’s success: Personal commitment, clever entrepreneurial decision-making, a high level of sensitivity to the changing needs of the market, and a core business that has become a byword for quality and consistency, founded on the distinct power to innovate.

Tackling the challenges of the period and of the market have always played a role in shaping the direction of the company. This is simply something that Buhler has always done, and when it comes to generating benefits and added value for our customers, we have always been a step ahead.

Bühler is a specialist and technology partner for plant and equipment and related services for processing basic foods and manufacturing high-grade materials. The Group is a global market leader in the supply of flour production plants, pasta and chocolate production lines, fish and animal feed manufacturing installations, and aluminium die casting systems.

The core technologies of the Group are in the field of mechanical and thermal process engineering. With its expertise and over 150 years of experience, Bühler time and again rolls out unique and innovative solutions for its customers, helping them achieve success in the marketplace.

Over the decades Bühler has come to be acknowledged as a reliable partner thanks to its distinct commitment to quality and its global presence.

Bühler Group operates in over 140 countries, has a global payroll of 7860, and generated sales revenues of CHF1907 million in fiscal 2010.


Visit the website HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Skretting plans to cease UK production due to market overcapacity

Skretting, a global leader in aquafeed, today announced on the 6th November that the company has started a process of consulting with employees with the view to cease production in the UK at the end of April 2019.
 
Image credit: Ikor Merodio on Flickr
(CC BY-ND 2.0)

This move is aimed at reducing the overcapacity in the highly competitive salmon feed market, and better utilise the company's existing production facilities in Europe. The company has no plans to stop production in other markets and will continue to pursue its firmly established growth strategy.

"Unfortunately, we are experiencing unsustainable market conditions in the UK. With a new large feed plant becoming operational in Scotland early 2019, the total feed capacity in the region is expected to exceed the total market by more than 50 percent. This is driving down prices, leading to an unsustainable commercial environment", says Therese Log Bergjord, CEO Skretting. "We have therefore made the decision to start consulting with our employees on a proposal to cease feed production in the UK".


Read the full article on the International Aquafeed website, HERE.

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the
magazine International Aquafeed which is published by
Perendale Publishers Ltd

For additional daily news from aquaculture around the world: aquaculture-news



See our data and privacy policy Click here