Supported by:





Monday, May 19, 2014

19/05/14: Effects of feeding rate and frequency on growth performance, digestion and nutrients balances of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS)

USFWS technician with Atlantic salmon
Photo credit: U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Northeast Region)
A 10-week study was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding rate and frequency on growth performance, digestion and nutrients balances of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in replicated recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). Replicated groups of juvenile salmon weighing 90 ± 2.5 g (mean ± SD) were fed a commercial feed (21.63 M
J kg−1 gross energy) to designed feeding rate (1.4%, 1.6% and 1.8% body weight day−1, BW day−1) and feeding frequency (2 and 4 meals day−1) combinations. Specific growth ratio varied between 1.15 ± 0.02 and 1.37 ± 0.16% day−1, and feed conversion ratio ranged from 0.96 ± 0.03 to 1.16 ± 0.02. The nitrogen and phosphorus retention rates were from 36.50 ± 1.94 to 47.08 ± 5.23% and from 20.42 ± 1.05 to 38.59 ± 2.80%. Apparent digestibility coefficients (ADC) in dry matter, protein, lipid and energy showed no significant differences for all groups. However, fish fed at 1.6% BW day−1 and 4 meal day−1groups had relatively better growth and nutrient retention efficiency compared to other groups. In addition, concentrations of nitrogenous and phosphorous compounds were also detected in this study. These results suggested that salmon of 100–200 g in RAS could in practice be fed at 1.6% BW day−1 and 4 meals day−1, taking environmental impacts into account.

Source [1]

The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the magazine International Aquafeed which is published by Perendale Publishers Ltd.

No comments:

Post a Comment