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Tuesday, December 9, 2014

09/12/2014: Do pufferfishes hold their breath when inflated?

A newly-published study by a team of Australian scientists reveals that inflated pufferfish do not hold their breath - refuting a common widespread belief, The Guardian reports.

When harassed, a pufferfish rapidly gulps water (or air) into its stomach, transforming itself into a prickly 'beach-ball' three or four times larger than the deflated fish. They inflate to avoid being swallowed by predators. But does an inflated pufferfish breathe? 
 
http://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2014/dec/04/do-pufferfishes-hold-their-breath-when-inflated

Most people think inflated pufferfish hold their breath, and compensate for oxygen debt by absorbing oxygen directly through their skin. But a newly-published study by a team of Australian scientists shows that idea is wrong, revealing that the gills are the primary site of respiration for inflated pufferfish. The researchers also found that even though inflated pufferfish consume as much as five times more oxygen than when they are resting, they do not compensate for their increased energetic demands by absorbing oxygen through their skin.


Read more HERE.

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