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Monday, April 10, 2017

11/04/2017: Do we need books?

by Ioannis Zabetakis, Lecturer on Food Lipids, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

In the era of Internet, of virtual resources, of distance learning, of twitter and Facebook, do we really read?

 
Ioannis Zabetakis

Are we really reading an article from the first to the last word? Or do we just flip through the lines? These are a few questions that come to my mind every time students use their phones during (!) a lecture.

I guess the fundamental issues here are about resourcing information. Do we Google or do we go to a library? Or perhaps both? I have to confess that I am rather traditional guy when it comes down to sourcing scientific information.

I very much prefer spending quality research time in front of a pc and among the shelves in a library rather than just surfing the Internet.

Stemming from this, I have a belief that books are invaluable sources of information. But books are something more than mere information sources. Writing a book constitutes a political praxis.

An author has the chance to critically evaluate information, to provide a novel insight but also promote their views on how we can improve our practices. Having this in mind, I think that writing a book is a unique opportunity to expose a novel idea to the world.

With this is mind; I am glad that I have started writing a book for Elsevier on the value of nutrition in relation to cardiovascular diseases.

In this book, we are going to have a chance to address the side effects of statins and make a scientific statement on the unique value of a balanced diet. We plan to take a critical stance on how things are run now.


Read the full article HERE.

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