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Monday, June 2, 2014

02/06/14: Gills Creating, Nurturing, Growing

During Australian Healthcare Week 2014 recently GILLS highlighted that we should all be asking ‘Why are we not promoting good nutrition at all levels of healthcare? Pills and drugs are not necessarily the solution - education on good nutrition (especially fish & seafood) would have much greater impact.’
In the USA, 75% of the health care dollars goes to treatment of chronic diseases. These persistent conditions—the nation’s leading causes of death and disability—leave in their wake deaths that could have been prevented, lifelong disability, compromised quality of life, and burgeoning health care costs. The situation is no different in Australia.
To enhance this discussion the Seafood & Health Session of the World Aquaculture Adelaide Conference will be held on Monday 9 June and will hear from a range of researchers and commentators on this important subject.
GILLS is extremely pleased that research information only made available last week will be presented by researchers from the University of Adelaide's Robinson Research Institute who investigated the dietary patterns of more than 300 South Australian women to better understand their eating habits before pregnancy. The information confirms the importance of nutrition.

Vicki Clifton and Jessica Grieger will present on that information and will be joined by keynote speaker, Martin Bowerman (author of ‘Lean Forever’), José Fernández-Polanco and Roy Palmer. One of the presentations will also be delivered from the Committee on World Food Security High Level Panel of Experts (FAO) based on its ‘Report on Sustainable fisheries and aquaculture for food security and nutrition’.

“Seafood harvested from aquaculture is a complete nutrient package being the major source of animal proteins and micronutrients for many coastal populations and is a renewable and sustainable source of polyunsaturated fatty acids (DHA, EPA) for optimal brain development and the prevention of coronary heart disease. Additionally it is a unique and complete source of micronutrients (calcium, iodine, zinc, iron, selenium, etc.) and an important source of Vitamins (A, D, B group) generally scarce in rural diets. These are essential benefits which families should consume weekly to ensure a happy, healthy life and comply with dietary guidelines,” said GILLS Executive Director, Roy Palmer.


The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the magazine International Aquafeed which is published by Perendale Publishers Ltd.

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