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Friday, June 27, 2014

27/06/14: 'Immediate protection' needed for Pitcairn's marine bounty

Is conservation the answer? How do you protect such zones? Who will pay to secure such zones and the maintenance required? Questions need to be asked about such ideas as reported here.

Researchers say that "immediate protection" is required for the waters around the remote Pitcairn Islands in the Pacific, home to one of the world's rarest and most valuable collections of marine species.

The waters have "unique global value that is irreplaceable" says the report, from an international team of scientists.

They've carried out the first underwater surveys of the deep and shallow waters around the islands, best known for their connection to the mutiny on the Royal Navy ship, Bounty, in the 18th century.

Some of the mutineers settled on Pitcairn and around 50 of their descendants still live there, governed as a British overseas territory.


 The Aquaculturists
This blog is maintained by The Aquaculturists staff and is supported by the magazine International Aquafeed which is published by Perendale Publishers Ltd.

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