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Tuesday, March 24, 2015

24/03/2015: Endocrine-disrupting chemicals can adversely affect reproduction of future generations of fish

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical that is used in a variety of consumer products, such as water bottles, dental composites and resins used to line metal food and beverage containers. Often, aquatic environments such as rivers and streams become reservoirs for contaminants, including BPA, Medical Xpress reports.
  
http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-03-endocrine-disrupting-chemicals-adversely-affect-reproduction.html
Rice fish were used in the study
Now, University of Missouri researchers and US Geological Survey (USGS) scientists have determined that fish exposed to endocrine-disrupting chemicals will pass adverse reproductive effects onto their offspring as many as three generations later. These findings suggest that BPA could have adverse reproductive effects for humans and their offspring who are exposed to BPA as well.

"BPA has been proven to mimic the function of natural hormones in animals and humans. Fish and aquatic organisms often have the greatest exposure to such chemicals during critical periods in their development or even throughout entire life cycles," said Ramji Bhandari, an assistant research professor of biological sciences at MU and a visiting scientist with the USGS.

"This study shows that even though endocrine disruptors may not affect the life of the exposed fish, it may negatively affect future generations."


Read more HERE.

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