Thursday, May 31, 2012

VIV China



Consumer attitude and behaviour towards food is rapidly changing on a worldwide scale. There is a strong focus on health issues including healthier food.

Over 30 years ago VIV started as a concept for animal production in poultry and pigs and became an innovator on the subject.

More information...


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

The relationship between Bering Sea ecosystems and fisheries

Bering Sea research reveals how changing ecosystem impacts America's most valuable fisheries.

The report by NOAA, published in the journal Deep Sea Research II  has found that Bering Sea marine mammals, birds, and fish are shifting where they eat, bear their young, and make their homes in response to changes in sea ice extent and duration. 


Bering Sea
Bering Sea (Photo credit: mdheightshiker)
This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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Report: Probiotics in shrimp farming

While commercial applications of probiotics are still at an early stage in Europe, it is a commercial and practical reality in many aquaculture countries in Asia and South and Central America,.  The use of probiotics in aquaculture was originally developed to achieve better management of disease and is now increasing...
Aquaculture
Aquaculture (Photo credit: Bytemarks)

By M. Castex, Lallemand Animal Nutrition, published on Engormix


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here



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Norel: Stability of Gustor BP-70 during extrusion

Norel reveals details of its research into the stability of Gustor BP-70 during extrusion

Gustor BP-70 (70% of protected sodium butyrate) belongs to the third generation of sodium butyrate products available in the market. Knowing the weak points of coated products, our R&D department has been looking for ways to produce a more concentrated, though still protected, natural growth promoter. 

After more than 2 years of research we came with a new and unique production process leading to the development of Gustor BP-70. In this product, fat and sodium butyrate are part of the same matrix. This is different from coating technology. This also ensures a gradual release along the digestive tract while coated products are liberated in the last parts of the gut. Gustor BP-70 has shown it is active at 3 levels: (1) Increases development of villi (growth promoter effect), (2) maintenance of colonic barrier integrity (effective against pathogens such as Salmonella), and (3) immune-modulating properties. 

In a recent stability trial, Gustor BP-70 was added into shrimp feed at the dose of 1 kg per MT before extrusion (temperature 110ºC.) The content of butyric acid was determined by HPLC. Results indicate a recovery of 98.2%, demonstrating the excellent stability of butyric acid contained in Gustor BP-70 during the feed pelleting process.

Contact: Monica Puyalto, mpuyalto@norel.es
 
This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Alltech


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Alltech focuses on natural scientific solutions to today’s biggest agriculture and food industry challenges. Headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky, Alltech has offices and distributors in 128 countries; 4 bioscience centers; and 31 manufacturing facilities located strategically throughout the world.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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Management changes at Nutreco

Nutreco has  announced that Wout Dekker will hand over his responsibilities as CEO on 1 August 2012 to Knut Nesse. The current Managing Director of Skretting Northern Europe and Australia, Viggo Halseth (1958), will be nominated for appointment to the Executive Board of Nutreco and Chief Operating Officer Aquaculture at the upcoming Extraordinary General Meeting of Shareholders on 23 July 2012. In both capacities Viggo Halseth will succeed Knut Nesse.

Wout Dekker comments: "On 9 February of this year we have announced that Knut Nesse will succeed me by the end of 2012 as CEO of Nutreco. Since then we have witnessed the continuing strong momentum of Nutreco's business as we have been able to reconfirm in our first quarter results. The confidence in our strategy and the execution of our plans is strongly supported by our shareholders and other stakeholders. Knut is ready to take over and start in his new role as CEO. Now that we have our topstructure in place, I am more than comfortable to make room somewhat earlier than anticipated".


Jan-Maarten de Jong, Chairman of the Supervisory Board: "Since February we have concentrated on a transfer of responsibilities and considered the future composition of the Executive Board. We are happy that with Viggo Halseth we can nominate an internal candidate as the successor of Knut Nesse. Being with Nutreco since 1984 and having served the company in a broad range of managerial roles, Viggo Halseth has fulfilled an important role in the success of our Aquaculture division. Viggo is best positioned to succeed Knut as Executive Board member and COO Aquaculture. After his appointment, as from 1 August 2012 the Nutreco Executive Board will consist of Knut Nesse (CEO), Gosse Boon (CFO), Jerry Vergeer (COO Animal Nutrition) and Viggo Halseth (COO Aquaculture)".
English: Nutreco logo Nederlands: Nutreco logo
English: Nutreco logo Nederlands: Nutreco logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

More information...

This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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Radioactive bluefin tuna found off Californian coast

Pacific bluefin tuna caught off the coast of California have been found carrying radioactive contamination from the Fukushima nuclear accident.

The fish are thought to have picked up the pollution while swimming in Japanese waters before making the 6,000 mile trip to the US.
The radiation warning symbol (trefoil).
The radiation warning symbol (trefoil). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is the first time a large migrating fish has been found to carry radioactivity over such a distance.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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Banned antibiotics in Asian fish imports



Australian officials are seeing a rising number of Asian fish imports containing banned antibiotics, according to a report in The Age, Melbourne.

Tiếng Việt: Thuyền thúng
Tiếng Việt: Thuyền thúng (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Five consignments of fish from Vietnam have been stopped by authorities this year because they contained enrofloxacin, an antibiotic barred in Australia, official figures show.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

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Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Australian fisheries reviews shares sustainability recommendations

An independent review into commercial fisheries in New South Wales, Australia has suggested changes to improve sustainability.

Focusing on fishery policy, management and administration, the team recommended three key reforms:

1. A comprehensive structural adjustment program to address the problems of excess and poorly defined fishing rights if the original vision for share managed fisheries is to be realised;

2. Governance processes be reformed to achieve a proper balance of responsibilities and accountabilities within Government and industry to restore confidence in decision making; and

3. Consultation be reformed to provide for effective processes and structures to facilitate co‐ ordinated advice, communication and feedback between Government and industry.

  
Coat of Arms of the State of New South Wales, ...
Coat of Arms of the State of New South Wales, used for formal and ceremonial purposes (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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Monday, May 28, 2012

Stated-owned aquaculture company promised in Oman

The Oman government is planning to establish a state-owned company to support the country's aquaculture sector.

The proposal is part of a series of initiatives to boost production to 220,000 tonnes by 2030.
 

Muscat, Oman
Muscat, Oman (Photo credit: themaloryman)
This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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IHN virus in Washington state, USA

The IHN virus has been detected at a fish farm off Washington state, USA for the first time.

Seattle-based American Gold Seafoods has been forced to kill its Atlantic salmon stock reared in net pens Rich Passage off the southern tip of Bainbridge Island. 
English: Bainbridge Island, viewed from the fe...
English: Bainbridge Island, viewed from the ferry approaching Eagle Harbor. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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Aquaculture UK 2012: Fish consumption on the decline

Aquaculture UK 2012 provided a platform for invited speakers on fish marketing, notably, Dr Martin Jaffa of Callander McDowell, who specialises in market driven strategies for the salmon industry and Jimmy Young, from Stirling University.
 

Much to the surprise of many, Martin provided data to support the view that annual finfish consumption in many European countries such as UK and France as well as USA and yes, Japan are either stagnant or in decline. He adds that in the UK in 2009 and 2011 fish consumption was only 1.65kg/person/year amounting to just six fillet portions. 

fish & chips
fish & chips (Photo credit: David Ascher)
The main reason proposed for this stagnation was the ageing populations in these countries who have a preference of fish and the disappearance of the traditional fish mongers and emergence of hypermarkets. Martin proposes that the industry should do more to take the fish to the consumer and promote, in particular salmon, with fast foods, ready meals and mix fish with other meats.
 

Jimmy Young highlighted key emerging issues in marketing of fish and called for more research in understanding the global market value chain and market trends. In recent years the reduction of ICT costs and use of electronic point of source information (tills at supermarkets) has generated huge amounts of information and further challenges for understanding consumer behaviour, especially how the we can link products to core values of consumers. 

Jimmy also highlighted the need to diversify fish products using fish as a basic ingredient and ensuring greater efficiency of use of fish through meat and bone separation technologies. There is danger of information overload in complex messages being received by consumers and the industry is reminded of choices consumers have with other meat proteins and entrenched interests of agriculture who increasingly see fish as a strong competitor.  

Prof Krishen Rana
 
This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here


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Friday, May 25, 2012

Nutriad


Nutriad provides innovative solutions that meet the current and future needs of our industry, allowing livestock agriculture and aquaculture to increase productivity, sustainably and profitably.
 
Nutriad's aquafeed expert team develops products for fish and shrimp. Farm-to-fork insight into the aquaculture food chain constitute the foundation for an ample assortment of customer services to assist the feed industry in taking up these challenges.
This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

A great week for The Aquaculturalists

It's been a glorious week at The Aquaculturalists HQ.  
For once the sun has been shining (no mean feat in the UK) which makes everything better we think.
Some of the team headed up to Aviemore for Aquaculture UK 2012 which was a marvelous success despite the eight hour car journey there and back.  
On Wednesday, those of us left behind were lucky enough to catch a glimpse of the Olympic Torch as travel through the UK ahead of the London 2012 Olympic Games.  Check out our pictures below.



This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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Vietnam and Russia discuss fishery cooperation

More than 50 Vietnamese and Russian experts discussed cooperation in the fisheries sector at a seminar in Nha Trang, Vietnam on May 23, 2012.

Although the countries have collaborated on fishery research since 1988, Vietnamese ministers believe the cooperation had failed to reach its full potential.



This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

Eco-damage sparks fish fight in Istanbul

The relationship between local fishermen and large-scale fish farms can be fraught as freelance reporter, Alexander Christie-Miller discovers.  Originally published by EurasiaNet.org

At Köksal Yılmaz’s fish stall along the Sea of Marmara in Istanbul’s Bostancı District, bream and sea bass are as popular as ever. But the days when most of his fish came from these waters are long gone.

“If it wasn’t for fish farms, all of our businesses would go bust,” said Yılmaz, 50, who gave up his former livelihood as a fisherman eight years ago when yields dropped so low he could no longer make a living.

Pollution and overfishing have plagued the waters around Istanbul for decades. But now, with campaigners fighting for tougher regulations to prevent a total collapse in fish stocks, a boom in illegal trawling has led to violence.

In late January, Ahmet Aslan, head of a fisheries union on the European side of Istanbul, was sitting in a teahouse near his home when a man entered, asked him to step outside, and challenged him over his opposition to illegal trawling. He then pulled out a pistol and shot him in the face. Aslan lost his left eye. He has said the attack was a threat to campaigners from a cartel of illegal fishermen, whom he accuses of jeopardizing the future of the industry for the sake of short-term profit. 

“Ahmet Aslan’s case was the first, but, unfortunately, I think we will be seeing more,” said Defne Köryürek, another campaigner against illegal trawling. “There are no fish, there are lots of fishermen, and they are under tremendous pressure.”

She estimates there may be more than 300 trawlers operating illicitly in the Bosphorus and Sea of Marmara, with the practice increasing as much as fivefold since September 2011, when the Turkish government upped the minimum catch size for bluefish, a staple of Istanbul fishermen. The government increased the size restriction on bluefish from 14 centimeters to 20 centimeters, cutting into fishermen’s already narrow profit margins. 

But the revised catch-size is not enough for the scientists, environmentalists and small-scale fishing unions who campaigned for the move. The restriction, they say, will not protect the bluefish from commercial extinction, since it only spawns when it is 24 centimeters long. 

Were that to happen, the bluefish would join a long list of formerly abundant species that have all but disappeared from Istanbul’s waters, including turbot, sole, swordfish, bluefin tuna, lobster, and langoustine.

Kenan Kedikli, head of a small fishermen’s co-operative in Bostancı, says a vicious cycle has set in with some fishermen responding to dwindling stocks by fishing in ever more damaging ways. “When I was young, if you brought an undersize fish into the market, people would shout at you and heckle you,” he recounted. “But overfishing has destroyed this healthy culture.”

In November 2011, Durali Koçak, the director-general of Fisheries and Aquaculture Office of the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock, Durali Koçak, vowed to pursue the problem with “rigor and determination.”

Speaking to Turkey’s state-run Anatolia News Agency, Koçak said the ministry plans to introduce mandatory dockside inspections and a system of documentation during the transportation of fish to market. "This will ensure that accurate data is obtained and enable us to determine whether or not the fish have been caught in line with the rules or not,” Koçak said.

Campaigner Köryürek praised the government’s efforts, but said that the only way to end the problem of illegal fishing is to reduce the high levels of debt among fishermen, and, ultimately, to reduce the size of Turkey’s fishing fleet. Others are seeking increased protection for sensitive ecological areas within the Sea of Marmara.

The Turkish Marine Research Foundation (TÜDAV) has proposed a ban on all fishing and tourist development and restrictions on marine traffic around Istanbul’s Princes’ Islands and the Marmara Islands. “Currently, there are no protected zones at all in the Marmara Sea,” said TÜDAV President Bayram Öztürk, a professor of marine sciences at Istanbul University. He has presented the proposal to the government and expects a decision on it next month, he said.

Öztürk also represents Turkey in a four-year, €9 billion European Union-led initiative launched in February 2012. The program aims to protect biodiversity throughout the network of waterways, stretching from the Black Sea to the mouth of the Mediterranean. “We’re trying to make protected stepping stones and corridors for marine animals,” said Öztürk. “If we’re successful, it will be a huge victory for nature.”

But he added that other factors are contributing to the collapse of fish stocks, including invasive species in the ballast tanks of marine vessels and pollution, the main sources of which lie far outside Turkey’s control. “Seventy percent of the land-based pollution in the Black Sea comes from the Danube. It impacts not only the Black Sea, but the Marmara Sea and the Aegean Sea,” he said.

Every year, nearly 13 billion cubic meters of industrial and domestic wastewater from 11 European countries drains from the Danube, carrying around 260,000 tons of nitrogen and 50,000 tons of phosphorus, along with a cocktail of toxic metals, according to the International Commission for the Protection of the Danube. “The first thing that is needed is international co-operation and concerted action,” said Öztürk.

Many of those interviewed had sweet memories of the days when the seas surrounding Istanbul teemed with life, and wonder if they will ever return.

“When I was a girl in Emirgan [a neighborhood on the European side of the Bosphorus], people would catch fish in buckets,” recalled campaigner Köryürek. “They would dip them in the water and pull them out full of fish.”

“Now there’s nothing, and I don’t want to leave that to my children, " she said.

Alexander Christie-Miller is a freelance reporter based in Istanbul.

Originally published by EurasiaNet.org 

Read more... 

This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

Research: Marine reserves help sustain fisheries

No fishing areas are helping to sustain valuable Australian fisheries according to research published in the Cell Press journal, Current Biology.

Scientists applied a forensic DNA profiling approach to track the dispersal pathways of fish larvae throughout a network of marine reserves on Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

Though marine reserves have been set aside to help sustain fisheries, the study is the first to provide conclusive evidence that these marine reserves generate important recruitment subsidies to both fished and protected areas.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Muyang Single Screw Extruder


Founded in 1967, Muyang covers design, development, fabrication and installation in feed manufacturing, grain milling, environment protection, food processing, bulk solids handling and storage, steel structure building and industrial automation.
Headquartered in Yangzhou, P. R. China, Muyang has over 4000 employees, including 1000 technicians.
This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

Name change for Scottish salmon company

Lighthouse Caledonia will now be known as The Scottish Salmon Company. 

The company was saved from collapse in 2008 after an investment deal of £17m and has gone on to report record profits.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

Emerging shrimp disease in the Pacific

A new disease is causing significant shrimp death in the Pacific, according to a report released by the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA).

The disease, known as Early Mortality Syndrome (EMS) / Acute Hepato-Pancreatic Necrosis Syndrome or AHPNS is thought to be behind significant losses among shrimp farmers in China (2009), Vietnam (2010), Malaysia (2011) and Thailand (2012). 

World map depicting Asia Esperanto: Mondmapo b...
World map depicting Asia Esperanto: Mondmapo bildiganta Azion Español: Ubicación de Asia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
The disease affects both P. monodon and P. vannamei and is characterized by mass mortalities (reaching up to 100% in some cases) during the first 20-30 days of culture (poststocking in grow-out ponds). 

Download the  NACA Disease Advisory on EMS for further details about this emerging threat.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here
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Aquaculture UK: Noise under appreciated in aquaculture production

Banging the feed or the outflow pipe might be detrimental to the health of farmed fish; reducing fertilisation and impacting negatively on yolk sac development. 

That's a possible consequence of introducing unnecessary 'noise' into the aquatic environment, says Rogelio Sierra-Flores a student from Puebla City, Mexico's fourth largest city, who has just won the Novartis Animal Health (NAH) best student presentation at this year's Aquaculture UK 2012 conference. Called the “Young Scientist Award” the winner receives an all-expenses paid trip to the Novartis' Prince Edward Island (PEI) dedicated Aquaculture Research & Development site in Canada.
Rogelio Sierra-Flores receives the Novartis Young Scientist Award 2012 at Aquaculture UK's gala dinner

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Aquaculture UK 2012: Food security reaches back to the farm

Nathan Morehead worked in food safety and biosecurity in a large smoked salmon processing operation before moving into fish production servicing industry for Aquatic Hygiene in Inverness, Scotland in 2009.

"I quickly found that the issues of food safety were very similar and the principles the same," he told The Aquaculturists at Aquaculture UK 2012 in Aviemore, Scotland.

"The challenges and risks associated with farming can be addressed in a similar way based on the benefits to be gained from program's such as the RSPCA's Freedom Food scheme. Freedom from disease is not just a welfare issue but can bring commercial benefits as well.

"Biosecurity and food safety are identical in principle and both can be managed in the same way," he adds.

Nathan Morehead of Aquatic Hygiene Ltd, UK

He says identifying risks involved at every step, producers can eliminate them. This is particularly important with the growing demand for sushi and sashimi.

"We should all be working to reduce the likelihood of a major biosecurity scare or food safety risk occurring," he says.

Mr Moreland is not talking about 'one size' fitting the entire industry as each farm and processing facility are different if not unique.

"Once all risks have been identified, establishing a monitoring programme is the next step. This will help eliminate or minimise the risk. The final stage is verification of what is being achieved to prove the effectiveness of the controls.

"These procedures should be in place from egg production right through to the consumer purchasing the product."

This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

Organiser develops Aquaculture UK into more comprehensive event

David Mack the organiser of Aquaculture UK 2012 in Aviemore, Scotland, says there are more visitors to this year's event than had attended on the first day last time - two years ago.

"There's also a lot more exhibitors than last time with 20 new to industry. Ten years ago we were focused on feeds, nets and cages. Today we have expanded to cover services such as vaccines and medications, hygiene and nutrition and clothing. We are developing a strong servicing sector.

"Overall, It's busier than last time and the atmosphere is great. The weather is being kind given it was 2 degrees here last week!"

Tomorrow Mr Mack expects to be just as busy.

"We had per-registered 500. And we have attracted visitors as far away as Indonesia. Last time 26 nationalities were represented. This time it's over 30," he adds.
 
Dr Ingrid Lupatsch from the Centre for Sustainable Aquaculture Research at Swansea University, Wales with IAF's subscription's manager Tuti Tan and Aquaculture UK 2012 David Mack in the Osprey Arena in Aviemore, Scotland

This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here

Aquaculture UK heats up in Aviemore

Aviemore
Aquaculture UK 2012 got off to an exciting start in this northern Scottish town of Aviemore this morning in brilliant sunshine under the snow-capped Cairngorm mountains. Temperatures are expected to reach 25 degrees today and already this morning the Osprey Arena exhibitors are feeling the heat. With a substantial number of exhibitors in the Marque, Aquaculture UK 2012 is already proving a success.

Organisers have some 500 visitor packs ready and expect day two to be more crowded if this exceptional weather continues. Already by midday today the organiser say approximately 300 visitors had collected their registration badges. And this year's event has attracted over 400 exhibitors.

"Aquaculture UK exhibitors are particularly interested in our magazine when it comes to feeding equipment," says Darren Parris, IAF's international marketing manager who visits the event for the first time.

"Most of the exhibitors with feeding equipment are talking about new developments. For example Arvotec's new precise pipe fish feed system and the importance of recirculation and its impact on feed and on water quality are features too."
The Aquaculturists will report on the conference running alongside the exhibition later.

This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here.

PellTech

PellTech is a combined pellet binder and die lubricant for formulations with DDGS, cassava and other hard running ingredients.

It is a lignin-based product that acts as a combined pellet binder and lubricating aid and will increase production rate and pellet durability simultaneously, resulting in more pellets and more quality. 


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here.

New home for Jamaican lobsters

A minimum of 30 lobster condominiums are to be installed during as the Jamaican government works to improve the productivity of the fisheries sector, reports Alecia Smith-Edwards in the Jamaica Information Service (JIS).

Some $25 million has been set aside in the 2012/13 Estimates of Expenditure for this initiative under the Improving Jamaica’s Agricultural Productivity (Marine) Project in the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries.

The funds will also be used for the installation of an artificial reef at Discovery Bay; the completion of training and capacity building interventions at six beaches; monitoring of artificial reefs and lobster condominium; distribution of technology packages; and maintenance and monitoring of rehabilitated beach infrastructure.
Constructing an artificial reef using concrete...
Constructing an artificial reef using concrete blocks (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A further $3.1 million has been provided for the Development of the Inland Fishing project, which is concerned with aquaculture training for fish farmers and staff at the Aquaculture Unit; conducting experiments into growth and nutrition of tilapia; and conducting research into the propagation and production of ornamental fish.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here.
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Mainstream Canada's Dixon Bay farm now empty

The last fish were removed from Mainstream Canada's Dixon Bay farm late Monday night and the site is now empty.
 
The company is now focused on developing a plan for cleaning and disinfecting the farm site, as per the requirements of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

The cull comes after routine health tests revealed the presence of the IHN virus last week.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here.
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Aquaculture UK 2012 opens today

Aquaculture UK 2012 opens today in Aviemore, Scotland.

With over 100 exhibitors representing manufacturers and suppliers, visitors can expect to see the latest developments and products from the aquaculture world.

The Aquaculturalists and International Aquafeed magazine are there too.  Come over to the Osprey Arena, Stand 10 to see what all the fuss is about.

This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here.

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Plans for New Zealand mussel farm halved

Mussel growers Knight Somerville Partnership have halved the size of the mussel farm they want to build on Beatrix Bay in Pelorus Sound, reports Cathie Bell in the Marlborough Express.

They made the move at the start of a hearing on whether to grant resource consent to their application. 

The hearing, before Commissioner Richard Fowler on behalf of the Marlborough District Council, heard that rather than the original 9.19 hectares, the application was now for 4.35 hectares, further away from Tuhitarata Bay, which is designated as marine farm-free.

Read more...
 
This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here.

Andritz

The ANDRITZ GROUP is a global market leader in the supply of plants, equipment, and services for hydropower stations, the pulp and paper industry, for solid/liquid separation in the municipal and industrial sectors, the steel industry, as well as for the production of animal feed and biomass pellets.

Headquartered in Graz, Austria, Andritz employs 17,063 people worldwide.

This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here.

Fish gut could show effects of climate change

As sea temperatures rise, stocks of some fish species will decline while others will grow, reveals new research from the University of Gothenburg looking at gastrointestinal function in fish.

The research examined gastrointestinal function in fish and found that the gastrointestinal system in fish is much more sensitive to temperature changes than previously believed. This may even be a limiting factor for the distribution of species, the thesis shows.

By looking at how gut function in various fish species is affected by both rapid and slow changes in water temperature, we can better understand what will happen to different species when the climate changes.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here.

Vietnam's fish farms on the rise

Vietnam's fisheries sector will increase its fish farms to 1.2m hectares, producing as much as 4.5m tonnes a year and reaching an annual growth rate of 5.2 percent by 2050, reports the Communist Party of Vietnam.

The plan was announced at a conference on development plans for aquaculture for 2020, with a vision to 2030, held by the General Department of Fisheries, in Hanoi on May 18. 

The sector also set a target of earning an annual export revenue of between 7 to 7.5 billion USD, a rise of almost 7.5 percent annually, and will employ about 3.5 million workers.


This blog is written by staff at International Aquafeed Magazine which is published and supported by Perendale Publishers Limited. To get your copy of PPL's web application, 'PPLAPP' click here.

Monday, May 21, 2012

Alltech Symposium: Press conference highlights

The Aquaculturist wraps up the key points of the Alltech Symposium press conference.

Speakers include Pearse Lyons, Alltech; Tim Gannon, co-founder Outback Steakhouse; Karl Dawson, Alltech.

Is an agriculture degree useful?

Ag, biochemistry, marketing innovations, Alltech's focus is very much on these things.  The students are the future of agriculture and of feeding the world.


Alltech in Brazil

Pearse Lyons: Brazil is always a very special place for Alltech.  It is the power house of Latin America.  the question now is how to make it a quality machine.


What are the challenges facing business as world demand for food increases?

Tim Gannon: Cost is a big thing.  Grain and corn prices are being used as biofuel so they are more expensive
So then we turn to poultry and fish.  So we'll probably shift a bit towards that but we are a steakhouse

Safety is the number one thing and how we can feed 130m people a year safely. 


How are you going to produce 70% more food?

Pearse Lyons: We are not that efficient.  Growing of the plants themselves: we have stretched it to the limit with fertilisers.  If we start looking at plants and the feeding of plants we can significantly increase yields.  We need to improve productivity of our land.


Are you going to invest in Central America?

Karl Dawson:  We want to set up research alliance programs.  We are looking for partners for that in Central America and have two in the pipeline.


Can you give some more information about your work with Sanders-Brown Center for Aging?

Karl Dawson: It is embryonic in terms of development.  we are a little bit tight-lipped on our clinical trails for drug development.  we have out first meeting with the FDA in two weeks.
 
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