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Monday, October 5, 2015

05/10/2015: Southern Ocean sucks up more carbon dioxide than was thought

Remote ocean has doubled its intake of the greenhouse gas since 2000, reversing an earlier decline.


Nicolas Metzl
A ship from the Indian Observation Service (OISO) takes measurements in rough seas in the Southern Ocean.

The Southern Ocean, which each year soaks up billions of tonnes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, has reversed a worrying decline in its annual intake of the greenhouse gas.
The finding comes as little surprise to climate scientists, who thought it inevitable that at some point the vast ocean around Antarctica would start absorbing more CO2 as atmospheric concentrations of the gas rise. But the study1 — which pulls together millions of scattered field observations — brings a much clearer understanding of the variable activity of the Southern Ocean as the world’s most important buffer against global warming. The work was published on 11 September in Science.


Read more HERE.

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