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Wednesday, May 11, 2016

11/05/2016: MailOnline: Death of coral stops fish learning to avoid predators - and reefs may decline further as a result

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3583280/More-trouble-Nemo-Death-coral-stops-fish-learning-avoid-predators-reefs-decline-result.html
Bleached coral (Image: Eco Cafe' Phuket)
Australia's Great Barrier Reef is suffering its worst coral bleaching in recorded history with 93 per cent of the World Heritage site affected, Sarah Griffiths writes for MailOnline.

Now researchers have found that coral bleaching and death can have dramatic repercussions for how small reef fish learn about and avoid predators.

The finding is not only bad news for the fish but the reef itself, because it could prevent the living colonies replenishing.

In a world first study researchers have found that coral bleaching and death can have dramatic repercussions for how small reef fish learn about and avoid predators. A selection of small fish in a reef are shown above

Coral reefs are extremely rich ecosystems, providing homes to hundreds of thousands of animals.

There are many stresses on coral reefs globally and places that used to be beautiful coral gardens are now instead littered with dead coral skeletons covered in algae, caused by bleaching.

Read the full article HERE.

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