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Friday, July 29, 2011

Chilean salmon virus possibly came from Norway

The salmon virus, that has hit the Chilean salmon farming is thought to have originated in Norway. A major salmon producer has acknowledged this. Cermaq a state controlled company in Norway and who is a major exporter of salmon eggs has concluded that the salmon eggs that came from Norway are most likely to be the reason for the outbreak.

The outbreak was first reported by Marine Harvest another Norwegian company. The Chilean industry, suffered more than US$2 billion (€1.403 billion) in losses, and saw its production of Atlantic salmon fall by half and had to lay off 26,000 workers, their major clients include the United States and Brazil. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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AquaBounty defends its genetic salmon project

AquaBounty Technologies, the company that developed the GM salmon, is now having to defend its creation. The US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) had all but agreed to allow its sale, AquaBounty Technologies CEO Ronald Stotish  said in a statement:

“We remain confident that the more deliberative body of the Senate will refrain from interfering in the 15-year scientific review by the US FDA. The facts about the safety and the environmental benefits of the fish have been made fully public by the FDA. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Sri Lanka President inaugurates aquaculture conference in Colombo

July 28, 2011 see the first ever Asia Pacific Regional Ministerial Meeting on Aquaculture for Food Security, Nutrition and Economic Development. The Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA) have organised the two-day ministerial meeting in association with the Sri Lankan government. 

The meeting was inaugurated by the President of Colombo Mahinda Rajapaksa. His keynote speech said of the commitment of the Asian political leadership. He also spoke of the resources and the need to overcome the challenges faced by fisheries and aquaculture in the region and the need to sustain and expand the regional initiative. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Malaysia considering reducing exports of fish

Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Minister Datuk Seri Noh Omar said that Malaysia may "reduce exports to ensure that there is enough to meet the domestic needs'. He said there had been a drastic rise in the volume of fish exports of late, with statistics showing 7,222 tonnes for April, 17,553 tonnes for May and 30,536 tonnes for June. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Nutreco see's revenues jump by 14.3 percent

The Dutch animal nutrition and fish feed company Nutreco saw their overall profits in 2011 jump by 14.3 percent. Nutreco enjoyed revenues of €2.6 billion (US$3.707 billion). CEO Wout Dekker stressed "that growth is clearly back in salmon farming and Chile is seeing a strong recovery from the ISA virus while Norway continues to have a good performance".

"Fish feed is delivering excellent results. Skretting Chile will reopen its Pargua fish feed plant in September 2011 to meet the growing demand,” Dekker said. He explained that Nutreco is exploring opportunities to further diversify in feed for other fish species and in new regions including South-East Asia and South America. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Thursday, July 28, 2011

Nutreco and DSM look to possible joint buy out of Provimi

Nutreco a global leader in animal nutrition and fish feed and Royal DSM a global science based company active in health, nutrition and materials. Announced a possible joint venture in the purchase of Provimi. Provimi is a world leader in animal nutrition with approximately 70 plants in 26 countries, employing nearly 7000 employees with 350 scientist.

Both Nutreco and Royal DSM has issued a joint statement confirming that should the opportunity arise, they have decided to jointly explore the possibility of acquiring Provimi. They went on to say that a further statement will only be made if and when appropriate. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


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Aquatic biotechnology is the focus of competition

According to a symposium in Beijing the out of which points to worldwide competition in aquatic sciences and technology with the main focus being on aquatic biotechnology. The symposium was held on July 17, 2011 in Beijing and was sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences. Zhang Xianliang, President of the Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, said in his remarks that although China had achieved obvious progress in the areas of:
  • functional gene screening and cloning 
  • screening and application of molecular markers of important traits
  • genetic linkage mapping of aquatic animals 
  • sex control and monosexual seed culture
  • molecular marker- or genetic marker-assisted selection
  • culture of embryonic stem cells of farmed aquatic animals and establishment of their cell bank
there remained a large gap between China and the world’s leading countries in terms of aquatic animals’ functional gene, development scale of key types of molecular marker, environmental genomics, comparative genomics, nutritional genomics and research on use of stem cell technology in protection of endangered aquatic species. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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University researchers discovery in sea lice infestations

Researcher at the University of Maine recently published a paper demonstrating that blue mussels can eat the larvae of sea lice. Sea lice  have recently been decimating farmed finfish stocks. “Extractive species are filter-feeding so they’re taking in all the phytoplankton and zooplankton and whatever’s in the water column, but they’re also taking in excess fish food and feces and removing all those organics from the water,” Ms Molloy said.

Sally Molloy a Postdoctoral researcher and microbiologist at the University of Maine “In our preliminary experiments we exposed mussels to some number of sea lice and we could see they were capable of eating them,” Ms Molloy said. “But we need to get a better understanding of disease dynamics on a farm.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers



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A new hope, eco-clean fish farms for aquaculture

Aquaculture has been growing steadily since the 1970's, the demand for seafood products has also been growing. One of the key issues with aquaculture is the need to have eco farming where fish are raised in an environment that is non polluting and sustainable. According to a report by the UN Fish and Agriculture Organization, aquaculture (artificially grown seafood) provides over 47% of total world supply of seafood.

At the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Professor Jaap Van Rijn has developed the first patented solution to the closed containment system. His patent is the first true step to sustainable and ecologically safe aquaculture, with zero discharge closed recirculation system that does not depend on location and is 100 percent non polluting. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers





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2011 Series the aquaculture roundtable: Aquaculture Feeds and Nutrition

TARS is a series of roundtable sessions that focus on specific sectors within the industry. The first sector identified for TARS 2011 is AQUACULTURE FEEDS & NUTRITION. Its a platform for all stakeholders to come together and share their knowledge and expertise in all the different aspects pertaining to aqua nutrition. Its also a place to learn about the up and coming challenges facing the aquaculture sector worldwide.

The Aquaculture Roundtable Series 2011 Aquaculture Feeds and Nutrition

August 17-18, 2011
Singapore
Website www.tarsaquaculture.com

For sponsorship / exhibitor information
Zuridah Merican
Email: zuridah@tarsquaculture.com 
Tel: +65 91512420

Registration contact
Liyana Khafiz
Email: registration@tarsaquaculture.com
Tel: +65 6327 8825   
                                                           Read more ...


This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


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Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Welcome to our 1000th blog, Thank you for following us

The future looks bright for Vietnam's aquaculture industry

Deputy head of the Directorate of Fisheries under the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) Dr Pham Anh Tuan said that domestic aquaculture had expanded outstandingly and that the output had increased by 15 percent on average per year. Science and technology research is continuing to push production and export forward.

Recent seafood technology research has boosted the industry and the quality of the seafood breeds, such as second generation tra (pangasius), which grows 13 percent faster than the first one. Even so, Tuan said "the technology faces obstacles regarding scattered farming, inadequate infrastructure and high water consumption in Vietnam". Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Fish Vet Group announces global expansion

The Fish Vet Group (FVG) has announced the expansion of its aquaculture health service into the Americas and Scandinavia. FVG will launch its global presence at Aquanor, Managing Director David Cox said “Our expansion has been very much demand-led. We started out by providing veterinary health services for a number of fish farming operations based around the coast of Scotland but over the last fifteen years, the production of farmed fish and shellfish has more than doubled around the world".

"Since 2009, the number of fish and shellfish farms has increased in North America and Europe, but in relation to marine catch operations, caged fish farming still only represents a third of the fish consumed. Globally, this relatively young industry is in a strong period of growth. Demand is rising for intelligent, practical solutions and veterinary products and so we are moving closer to our customers.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


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New Zealand falling behind the rest of world in aquaculture

Aquaculture in New Zealand is falling behind the rest of the world, the technology gap is painfully slow. In the Whole of New Zealand there are only two aqua feed manufactures both producing relatively small volumes. The aquaculture industry relies mostly on imported feed and depends totally on the development of foreign companies to improve the feed for the fish farms.

There was an attempt during the mid 1990's when NRM attempted to manufacture salmon feed, however this did not last long and failed. One of the big issues concerning aqua-feed in New Zealand is that New Zealand's aquaculture industry is at the mercy of the large international company. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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An aqua farm to get its own solar power supply

A fish farm in California is to get its own power supply in the shape of solar power. The fish farm will receive 221.16 kilowatt solar power system built by Sunvalley Solar. The system Sunvalley will build will power a farm by using 2,328 solar paneels from Tianwei Solarfilms, a 260 kilowatt solar inverter from PV Powered and the company expects it to generate 381,267 kilowatt hours annually.

Sunvalley Solar's CEO James Zhang "they expect the installation to be completed by September". Rocky French, owner of Aqua Farming Tech, said "it has been a positive experience so far and it offers their company the best possible solar solution". He said "he can't wait until the farm is completely powered by solar energy". Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Probiotic used as growth promoters in Monosex Nile tilapia

Two different commercial feed additives was tested on the growth performance of monosex Nile tilapia fingerlings. Biogen and Pronifer were tested along with a control. The whole experiment lasted 90 days generally, growth performance, feed conversion ratio, protein efficiency ratio and apparent protein digestibility were improved for monosex tilapia fingerlings fed on diets with commercial feed additives compared to fish fed on the control diet.

The study was conducted in the Fish Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Suez Canal University. the results showed that feeding with Biogen or Pronifer was a positive result with both treatments outdoing the control. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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China: Oil spill killing scallops

In North China's Hebei province the local head of the aquaculture association Yang Jizhen look at the devastation the oil spill has caused on the local scallop farming in the area. More than 160 groups of scallop farmers have said that more than half of the scallops raised are dead due to greasy oil particles.

The Fishermen has identified the cause of the oil spill as the Penglai 19-3 oil field jointly operated by the Houston-based ConocoPhillips' China subsidiary and its Chinese partner China National Offshore Oil Corp. The oil spill is being investigated by several government departments including the marine affairs bureau and the environmental protection bureau. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Aquaculture development of in the Bay of Biscay

AZTI-Tecnalia technological center are researching the possibilities of setting up aquaculture enterprises in the Bay of Biscay. International demand and the markets has made growing bivalves (mussels, oysters, scallops and clams) a profitable business challenge.

This key aims of this project, within the remit of the New (2009-2013) Strategic Plan for Fisheries and Aquaculture of the Basque Government, are the differential and profitable production of marine species for food; the development of diversification activities for the sustainability of the local fisheries sector; and the creation of new products for the food industry. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


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A single pond started it all for Bill Walton

Bill Walton surveys his ponds, that are full of bluegill and black catfish. To Bill its a hobby one he has done for years, he said "People don't realise fish are important," he said. "Fish is good food with the economy getting like it is and food prices skyrocketing. And it's a good hobby. You can make a little money out of it."

Bill Walton started in 1990 where he contracted to have his first pond dug out on his property and then stocked by the SC Department of Natural Resources with bluegills in the first year. This was part of a 50 year old stocking program which has since stopped due to cutback and economy. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


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US foodfish inventory numbers down 25 percent

The USDA has reported that foodfish inventory numbers are down on last years numbers. Catfish operations in the three major catfish producing states, are recorded as being down 25 percent on last years figures. The breakouts of foodsize fish inventory numbers on the first of July, 2011, with their respective percent change from the previous year were: large foodsize, 2.57 million fish, down 60 percent; medium foodsize, 33.8 million fish, down 45 percent; and small foodsize, 122 million fish, down 15 percent.

The three major States brood stock on hand on the first of July, 2011, was down five percent from last year's 455 thousand brood stock. The number of large stockers on hand on the first of July, 2011, totaled 176 million fish, up six percent from the 166 million fish on hand a year ago. There were 173 million small stockers, up two percent from last year. Producers had 732 million fingerlings and fry on hand on the first of July, 2011. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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A Review: Fish Oil Replacement and Alternative Lipid Sources in Aquaculture Feeds

In the last couple of decades aquaculture has developed into a major industry and it now
contributes at least 50 percent of all the fish consumed in the world.
 


One of the biggest problems to occur with aquacultures development has been how to feed the fish. The aquafeed industry is experiencing exponential growth in many countries especially Asia with estimates of annual growth up to 30 percent. 

In modern aquaculture feeds can account for between 50 and 80 percent of the total production costs and greatly reduces the profitability of the fish farms. It is estimated that aquafeeds currently use about 90 percent of the global supply of fish oil. 

The book presents up-to-date information about the importance of lipid nutrition in finfish aquaculture, and about the availability and use of oil sources in the production of aquafeeds.

Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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New study by top global fisheries experts

A new study carried out by top global fisheries experts showed an alarming assessment of several economically important fish populations, which included tuna and billfish. The analysis showed that of the 61 species of "scombrids," which include tunas, bonitos, mackerels and Spanish mackerels, and billfishes, which include swordfish and marlins, classified seven as threatened with extinction and four as "near threatened" for the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

The University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science professor, and assistant director of NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) David Die and colleagues scientifically evaluated the species population and conservation status under the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria, which is the most widely accepted system for classifying extinction risk at the species level. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Sri Lanka plans inland fisheries expansion

In 2010 Sri Lanka produced 52,000 tons of cultured fish, in 2011 this is expected to increase by 15 percent to 60,000 tons and they are targeting 90,000 tons by 2013 support by a program to push up production. Jayantha Chandrasoma, chairman of the National Aquaculture Development Authority of Sri Lanka said "Sri Lanka has 12,000 inland water bodies with enormous potential for cultivating fresh water fish.

He said in "Anuradhapura in north central Sri Lanka for example a tank or reservoir in Villachchi had produced 700 tonnes of fish. There were 200 fisher families around the tank, the government are seeding reservoirs with fingerlings to increase fish stocks. Rohana Subasinghe, senior fishery resource officer at the Food and Agriculture Organization said "Asia accounted for about 90 percent of the aquaculture in the world". Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Monday, July 25, 2011

Ghana get boost of $53.3 million to fisheries sub-sector

The World Bank recently approved an investment estimated at US$53.8 (€37.434)  million the International Development Association (IDA) will finance most of the award with US$3.5 (€2.435) million coming from the Global Environmental Facility (GEF). The project has five components dealing with fisheries, illegal fishing, increasing the contribution of fish resources to the national economy.

The Implementation of measures to increase the benefits to Ghana from fisheries resources. The forth component focuses on aquaculture development funded by the IDA with US$8 (€5.566) million. This component aims to set the framework for increased investment in inland aquaculture. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


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Greek aquaculture continues to hold second place in the EU

Greek aquaculture is holding its second place in the European Union (EU) for aquaculture production. Greece is situated ideally to maintain and continue its role as a major supplier of seafood and shellfish to the key markets. Greece is the top producer in the EU; it is first in production of both European gilthead sea bream and Mediterranean sea bass, with a 72 percent share of each variety.

Aquaculture play a major role in the economy of Greece supporting around 10,000 jobs, mainly in regional Greece, both on Islands and in remote areas. The country produces 370,000,000 fry and around 150,000 tons of seabass and seabream supplying markets in the EU, more than 85 percent of the fish exported. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers



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Cooke Aquaculture buys Culmarex SA

Morpol ASA has agreed the sale of one of its subsidiaries Culmarex SA of Spain to the Canadian company Cooke Aquaculture. Culmarex is the largest seabass and seabream farming operation in Spain. “We are always looking for strategic development and investment opportunities in the seafood sector,” explains Glenn Cooke, CEO of Cooke Aquaculture.

Both companies are please with the agreed sale and purchase, Morpol CEO Jerzy Malek said they are happy to place in the hands of an owner who will focus on continued growth and development. like Cooke Aquaculture, Culmarex is an innovator so both companies should be a perfect fit. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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AgriMarine expanation at Benxi farm China

AgriMarine the world leaders in floating solid wall containment technology, has announced that it has started to harvest the company's first crop of Chinook salmon to be reared in the Peoples Republic of China. AgriMarine's clean technology for rearing salmon has been successfully proven in the Benxi region of China.

Recently AgriMarine announced its expansion at the Benxi farm to four 24 meter tanks, two additional tanks are being fabricated and will be delivered during late summer. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers



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Friday, July 22, 2011

Associated Seafoods Ltd has acquired prawn processor Moray Seafoods Ltd

Moray Seafoods Ltd was acquired by Associated Seafoods Ltd in a move that will secure the future of the company and will allow it to develop a new strategy for the domestic and export markets for tope quality langoustine and scampi. This is the second acquisition that Associated Seafoods has made in the last few days.

Bill Hazeldean, chairman of Associated Seafoods, says "the acquisition will provide the springboard for expansion into new markets that will eventually be fuelled by product innovation to maximise the potential of langoustine landings into the processing facility".  “Quality Scottish-caught langoustine is a marvelous product that is in huge demand in many parts of the world. It is sustainably fished, tastes great and is healthy to eat,” he said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Can bluefin tuna farms really work?

In recent years the bluefin tuna has been heavily over fished, and there is still a big demand for this species. Its popularity means that the demand is still there, in Japan 90 percent of bluefin tuna is consumed as sushi. According to the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICAAT), its numbers are now 70 percent below their 1970 levels.

But there is hope, an Icelandic seafood conglomerate Umami are rearing bluefin at a Mexican fishfarm that they purchased in 2010 and they are calling it a "Sustainable" Pacific bluefin. This is just one of several aquaculture farms around the world that are trying to raise bluefin.  One of the problems of rearing bluefin is they are a migratory fish that is relatively slow to mature. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Two new aquaculture wharves open in NFL

Newfoundland and Labrador aquaculture business is expending with the opening of two new wharves. The wharves are located at Hermitage-Sandyville and Pool’s Cove, which are strategic locations for the development of the province’s growing aquaculture industry.

The two new wharves cost CAN$ 5.7 (€4.231) million and is part of a CAN$ 9 (€ 6.681) million dollars that was allocated over a three year period for the construction and upgrade of aquaculture wharves in the province. “The dedication of these wharves today marks a significant milestone for the aquaculture industry and for the Coast of Bays region,” said the Honorable Premier Kathy Dunderdale, Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Government Accepts MOU Proposals

Newfoundland and Labrador provincial government has accepted proposals from a report by Independent Chair of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) steering committee.To establish a seafood marketing council they will be working with the Federal Government to explore options.

“There are huge opportunities in international seafood markets and our provincial seafood producing sector now has the opportunity to reposition its products to very discerning and high paying customers within the global marketplace,” said Minister Clyde Jackman. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

DuPont and AquaChile sustainable partnership

DuPont and AquaChile have announced a partnership, that will bring together their joint expertise and experience in aquaculture to a more sustainable method to raise fish in the future. The partnership began in 2007 where they focused on Atlantic salmon, today salmon and trout aquaculture is worth an estimated US$10 (€7.046) billion globally.

DuPont BioMaterials Vice President John P. Ranieri. “Our partnership with AquaChile has created innovations that set new standards for the sustainable farming of salmon and we are committed to finding new solutions that will revolutionize the industry itself.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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New research show small scale fishers impact on marine life

New research recently carried out by the University of Exeter, into small scale fisheries and its impact on marine life, showed that these small scale fisheries do have more of an impact on marine life than was originally thought. The study was funded by Defra's Darwin Initiative and the US National Marine Fisheries Service.

University of Exeter Darwin Scholar and lead author, Joanna Alfaro, said: "Coastal communities in developing countries, such as those I work with in Peru, rely heavily on fishing for their food and livelihoods." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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In Ohio US they plan to raise their own bait

In Ohio the demand for bait fish has increased, so researchers at the Ohio Center for Aquaculture Development are enhancing the development of the spotfin shiner as a fish that is suitable to be raised on farms.

Ohio use to import its bait-fish, however, aquaculture specialists discovered there is plenty of land and water that is suitable to a variety of cool and cold water species. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Sustainability progress revealed by Marine Harvest

Marine Harvest has just released its report on sustainability for 2010-2011. Using a new format the two reports show how the company's commitment to being a leader in sustainability and how it has performed this year.

Sustainable Seafood- Our way

Update on Progress 2010

Marine Harvest Chief Executive, Alf-Helge Aarskog, commented: "At Marine Harvest, sustainability principles are embedded in every aspect of our business and are gradually becoming a strong part of our corporate culture." Looking to the future, Marine Harvest stated its ambition is to "enable our industry to increase the supply of nutritious seafood to the world’s population while improving our technology." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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SAGARPA Mexico invest in aquaculture infrastructure

The Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food in Mexico (SAGARPA), announced that it is to invest in the infrastructure of aquaculture by investing MX$50 million (€3.02 million). This investment will be used to promote genetic improvement of species, to increase feed availability.

This investment follows recommendations made by the FAO in order to strengthen the product system to achieve competitiveness. “When the Investment Support Program for Equipments and Infrastructure, Component: Genetics Resources for Aquatic System is set about, the Genetics Nucleus will supply a germ plasma bank,” Marco Linné Unzueta, General Manager of Aquaculture Research, explained. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Escaped Asian carp US to blame as much as fish farm

In Arkansas, it was true that a fish farmer was the first to bring three species of Asian carp into the US, but then the government agencies got hold of them, they spawned them in research ponds, and they stocked them in sewage lagoons as an alternative to chemicals. They even canned them as a cheaper substitute for tuna.

Now some of these agencies admit that they careless in the 1970s and 1980s and were not really concerned about this invasive species. Also the farmers were actively encouraged to raise this species by the government. But now the same government has banned live transport of the Asian carp, and the fish farmers feel utterly betrayed. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers

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Tuesday, July 19, 2011

GM salmon reveals danger of breeding to wild gene-pool

If a GM salmon escaped from captivity it is possible that they could breed with wild populations and pass their genes on. A recent study in Canada showed that they could breed with a wild salmon. "The use of growth-enhancing transgenic technologies has long been of interest to the aquaculture industry and now genetically modified Atlantic salmon is one of the first species to be considered for commercial farming. Yet, little is known about the potential impact on wild salmon populations if the GM species were to escape captivity," said lead author Darek Moreau from the Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Lighting helps boost production

The Northwestern States University's aquaculture research center is receiving nationwide attention due to recent studies where they have used underwater lights to produce bigger crawfish. Studies conducted over three harvest seasons have confirmed that the use of underwater lightening did produce larger crawfish.

“Production results are really impressive,” Dr Delabbio said. “This year was a difficult year for many crawfish farmers because of the drought situation in the state. However, we had our best production year yet and we didn’t use any more water than we normally do.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers



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Woods Hole Institute study on ocean changes

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution carried out a recent study. "What the study found was that in the next 10 to 50 years many countries are going to see impacts, particularly countries that are heavily reliant on clams and oysters and mussels, and will not be able to adapt by shifting to other foods or aquaculture methods," said Jackie Savitz, senior scientist and chief strategist for the International Ocean Conservation and Advocacy Organization Oceana.

This study showed that if nothing is done then the effects would affect the poor, but  it would also affect the developed Countries like US, UK, And other European countries. The study was published in July online in the journal Fish and Fisheries. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers



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Chinese ministry claims they are not responsible for dead fish

State Oceanic Administration and the Ministry of Agriculture has told a Beijing newpaper that the dead fish found near the site of the Penglai 19-3 oilfield in Bohai Bay was not caused by the oil leak. The results released by the State Oceanic Administration showed that the oil spill was 38 km east of Changdao county.

The ministry of agriculture also showed that the oil content had not exceeded the standard limit. These is speculation that the fish died from a bacterial infection, but this has not been confirmed and would not be known until further analysis was carried out on the dead fish. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers



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Aquaculture effect on world fish supplies

Extract from a paper called

Effect of aquaculture on world fish supplies
 

Nature 405, 1017-1024 ( June 29, 2000) doi:10.1038/35016500
 

Aquaculture fish production of shellfish and farmed fish has doubled in the last 15 years. Most people think that aquaculture is helping relieve the pressure on the ocean fish, but sadly the opposite is true for some types of aquaculture. Even though aquaculture is helping to reduce the pressure on the oceans, however if it is to be a sustainable option then aquaculture must reduce wild fish species input into feed and adopt a more ecological management practice.

The practice of using wild spices as part of the feed for the carnivorous bred species is also having an impact on the oceans populations. So long term growth of aquaculture needs to be both ecologically sound and sustainable, such practices can be encouraged by regulating the siting of ponds in mangroves and other coastal wetlands. Read more ...


This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers



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Monday, July 18, 2011

A Review: Chemical Communication in Crustaceans


Chemical Communication in Crustaceans covers a wide range of topics including the identity, production, transmission, reception and behavioural function of chemical signals in selected crustacean groups. There are several topics that the editors thought were ready for thorough review such as multimodal communication, deception and pheromones in aquaculture and pest management, but are still beyond the mainstream of crustacean research.

Thomas Breithaupt, (University of Hull, Department of Biological Sciences): Martin Thiel (Universidad Catolica del Mar Depto de Biologia Marina) edited Chemical Communication in Crustaceans. They worked with the authors that contributed their research material for this book, along with descriptions from some of the authors on their respective research fields. Read more ...

 This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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St Andrews students focus on sustainability

St Andrews University, is launching an on-line Postgraduate Diploma/ MSc in Sustainable Aquaculture. The first modules will be hosted by TheFishSite.com, that will give students an overview of aquaculture and fisheries.

Jonathan David and Neil Hazon (lecturers at St Andrews University) say: “The
domestication of numerous plants and animals and the development of modern techniques has meant that aquaculture has the potential to provide human needs in a sustainable fashion. Read more ...

The on-line course will be up and running later in the year. To register your interest http://www.thefishsite.com/learn/

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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US all set to open up large area's of coast to fish farming

In an effort to reduce its huge seafood import bill the United States is preparing to open up large area's of the coast to fish farming. The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have announced the new aquaculture initiative to help combat their growing sea food import costs. The proposed initiative will it is hoped foster public and private partnerships on regional projects that helps foster innovative sustainable practices.

It is also hopes that from these initiative jobs will be created in the coastal communities. NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco said: "Aquaculture is a critical component to meeting increasing global demand for seafood, job creation is a major focus of this administration. This initiative provides an opportunity to support innovation and growth in the private aquaculture sector, resulting in a healthy, local seafood supply and job growth at our working waterfronts.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Astec Aquaculture Center welcomes CFP reforms


The new Astec Aquaculture Business & Science Centre located on North East England’s Northumberland coastline, is a unique purpose-built facility which provides a supportive environment for all types of aquaculture related business and research activities. It has a specific focus on helping fledgling enterprises to become established and grow, and as such, provides a unique combination of ‘plug in and go’ facilities and specialist business support services.

Astec has a very unique offering that appeals to marine scientists and industry alike it has a year round supply of near tropical temperature, flow-through sea-water, enabling a wide range of aquatic plants and animals to be cultivated there. Further to Wednesday’s Common Fisheries Policy Reform, presented by Maria Damanaki, Commissioner for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Astec welcomes the EU’s recognition of the importance of developing ecologically viable aquaculture as part of its proposals to manage fish stocks.

Astec CEO Kevin Haddrick

Kevin Haddrick, chief executive of Astec says:

“We have previously highlighted the need for a co-ordinated approach to support the development of this dynamic but fragmented industry, so we are particularly supportive of the EU’s plans to establish a new Aquaculture Advisory Council to give advice and guidance on industry-related issues.

The report also states “A better framework for aquaculture will increase production and supply of seafood in the EU, reduce dependence on imported fish and boost growth in coastal and rural areas. By 2014, Member States will draft national strategic plans to remove administrative barriers and uphold environmental, social and economic standards for the farmed-fish-industry".

“As the UK’s first aquaculture business incubator, with a focus on supporting start-up businesses in the sector, we very much welcome the EU’s intention to remove administrative and legislative barriers to trade.” 
Mr Haddrick added: “Astec shares the views of Commissioner Damanaki that there is great potential within the aquaculture sector. We look forward to seeing how the framework develops and strongly suggest the EU grasp this opportunity to ensure aquaculture plays an integral part in developing a more sustainable approach to fisheries management.”

For further information about Astec please call: +44 1670 852771, email: info@astecaqauculture.com, or visit the website: www.astecaquaculture.com.

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers


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Friday, July 15, 2011

UK wild fish campaigners launch a new website

The wild fish campaigning group, the Salmon and Trout Association (S&TA) has launched an anti-salmon farming web-site,  www.standupforwildsalmon.org. They say that the interactive website has been compiled using data obtained under the freedom of information act and is aimed at highlighting the plight of the wild salmon populations.

This is the latest stage in the ongoing S&TA campaign to get the fish farming organisations to adopt a more sustainable practice and to avoid harming wild populations. This campaign also focuses on the issues of sea lice and disease outbreaks at individual farms. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little, The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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