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Thursday, March 31, 2011

Portugal urged to expand the natura 2000 network

In 2005, Oceana was the first organisation to photograph and take video footage of the Gorringe Bank seamounts, southeast of Cape St. Vincent, identifying 36 species that had never been seen before on these mountains. The international marine conservation organisation Oceana urges the Portuguese government to expand the Natura 2000 Network and protect its seamounts.

Despite the fact that Portugal has the largest marine area in the EU and the largest number of seamounts in the Northeast Atlantic, currently only 3 seamounts (João de Castro, Menez Gwen and Lucky Strike), all located around the Azores, are protected and included in the European network of protected areas known as Natura 2000. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Experts declare war

It started out in innocence, as things sometimes do, but this week an eight-year-old issue has gone from one extreme to the other. Back in 2003 the then Marlborough Sounds iwi took a case to the Maori Land Court. Their dispute arose from the Marlborough District Council failing to involve or consult them in the allocation of areas for commercial aquaculture in the Sounds.

Preceding their complaint was an unholy grab for commercial aquaculture, where local Maori never got a look in. That was the first extreme which led local Maori to seek a decision from the Maori Land Court to give them customary title to the foreshore and seabed of the whole of the Marlborough Sounds. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Economic assessment of fishing ports

The US Commerce Department has announced that economic development assessment teams will deploy next month to conduct a two-day analysis of six Northeast fishing communities.

The teams will visit Portland, Maine, Seabrook, N.H., New Bedford, Mass., Gloucester, Mass., Point Judith, R.I., and Montauk, N.Y. The assessment teams will conduct meetings with local leaders to help identify economic development challenges and opportunities facing local industries and communities.

The Department of Commerce is committed to supporting a vibrant and profitable fishing industry in the United States. The assessment teams will help communities identify and begin to address the economic difficulties they are facing,” Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said. “We know that by rebuilding stocks, we will improve economic conditions for fishermen and coastal communities, but we recognise that transition is difficult. We are committed to help identify proactive solutions during these challenging economic times.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Consumers not perturbed by possible radiation on fish products

The Fisheries Department has no future plan to conduct radiation tests on fisheries products in Sabah. “We have no future plan on this,” said the department’s deputy director (aquaculture), Rooney Biusing when contacted by The Borneo Post yesterday. He added that they had conducted one such test a long time ago.

Probed further on how long ago that was, Biusing said that it was probably ten years ago. “That test came back negative,” he said. He clarified that such test does not fall under the jurisdiction of the department. “It is not within the scope of our duties,” he said via short messaging service (SMS). The Fisheries Department’s role is on the sustainable management and development of fisheries. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Kenya, Israel sign pact to enhance fish rearing

The ministry of Fisheries Development yesterday signed a memorandum of understanding with Israel for aquaculture and fisheries development. The occasion also marked the beginning of the second hatchery management course for 60 fish hatchery managers who will help in mass production of fingerlings. Israel has provided Kenya with two experts to assist in the training.

The occasion took place at Sagana national aquaculture training centre and was attended by Fisheries Development minister Amason Kingi and Israeli Ambassador Jacob Keidar. The venture is aimed at boosting food production in the country as well as reduce pressure on the oceans and rivers, create employment.  Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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State must publish environmental information on salmon farming areas

Thanks to a complaint made by the NGO Centro Ecoceanos, the Transparency Council has ruled that Chile's National Fisheries Service (SERNAPESCA) must publish environmental information on salmon farming centres on its website.

Ecoceanos had complained to the watchdog on Transparency of Public Office and Access to Government Information (the Transparency Council) that SERNAPESCA had refused to provide Environmental Reports on a salmon farming centre owned by the Magellanes-based company Acuimag, which was infected with the ISA virus. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Tilapia helps prevent deadly virus against shrimp

Researchers at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) have found that raising white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) and tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) in the same pond promotes an ecological balance and a healthy development of both species, as well as preventing the death of crustaceans by the white spot virus.

This initiative, by the aquaculture engineer Frederico Santos da Costa, consists of a polyculture system which originally had another purpose: that small farmers in Santa Catarina have an alternative income from tilapia farming if their shrimp production was lost due to white spot, reports Ciência Hoje. This disease severely affected shrimp from the coast of Santa Catarina in 2004 and led to losses of BRL 6 million (US$3.6 million) (UK£ 2.239 million) for producers. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Natal to host World aquaculture meeting

World Aquaculture 2011 – Aquaculture for a Changing World - will be held in the northeast Brazil city of Natal on June 7-10, organised by the World Aquaculture Society (WAS) and Fenacam.

Attendance is expected in excess of 3,000 participants, representing over 50 countries. The 4-day program will host in excess of 60 sessions covering general categories such as: Aquaculture and Human Health, Crustacean Culture, Finfish Culture, Mollusc Culture, Aquaculture for a Changing World, Production Systems, and Feedstuffs-Feeds-and Feed Additives; finishing up with assorted Special Topics including genetics, education, engineering, economics, and much more. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Project to reproduce European eel in captivity includes Spain

A team of researchers from the Institute of Animal Science and Technology (ICTA), of the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia (UPV), participate in the PRO-EEL project, an initiative funded by the European Union (EU) which aims to successfully breed European eels in captivity.

This project is important to combat the critical state of eel stocks, "which have declined significantly and is reaching a situation that even casts doubt on their survival." The eel was recently included on a list of threatened species by the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Fauna and Flora (CITES). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Increasing efforts against aquatic non-native species

Gold medal Olympic rower and London 2012 ambassador, Ben Hunt-Davis joined Environment Minister Richard Benyon earlier this week to launch the Check, Clean, Dry campaign to stop the spread of aquatic invasive non-native species.

The campaign aims to counter the threat to Britain’s economy and wildlife posed by the spread of invasive non-native species such as the “killer shrimp”. Richard Benyon said: “Aggressive species from across the world have the potential to reach Britain and cause real damage and even wipe out some of our native wildlife. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Feed blocks brings Nutrition to big broodstock

Feeding a large halibut, such as broodstock fish, can be a challenge. While extrusion methods are good there is a limit to size. The answer according to Skretting is to make lots of smaller pellets and then stick them together into a larger block.

While extrusion methods are good at preserving the nutrition in feed pellets there is a limit to size. Above 17 mm in diameter pellets become unstable and tend to fall apart. But a 17-mm pellet just isn’t large enough to attract the attention of the somewhat laid back halibut. The answer according to Skretting is to make lots of smaller pellets and then stick them together into a larger block. The same method is proving successful in wrasse farming. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.



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Improving fish feed quality

Julia Wolska of Skretting Aquaculture Research Centre (ARC) has started a PhD thesis that may contribute to the development of a new generation of feed pellets from Skretting. The expectations from a modern fish feed are many. The feed should have the required nutritional profile, good digestibility and be attractive to the fish.

In addition, the physical quality of the pellets is of vital importance to the farmers. The pellet should not crumble or release fat and must withstand storage and have the proper sinking rate. The growing use of vegetable raw materials makes it increasingly challenging to meet all these requirements at once and there is a need for new research in this area. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.


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US soybean growers increase aquaculture support

Partnerships between US seafood producers and US soybean farmers continue to produce results as both seek ways to improve the US aquaculture sector as a sustainable source of nutritious finfish and shellfish.

The United Soybean Board (USB), which administers U.S. soybean farmers’ checkoff investments, along with state soybean checkoff boards fund projects to benefit domestic aquaculture producers. Most of these projects fall into one of two categories: Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.



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Production of Seabass and Seabream will remain stagnant

The Business Association of Marine Aquaculture Producers (Apromar), estimates that the production of Seabass and Seabream should remain stable during 2011. “The aquaculture sector expects a productive stagnation this year because of the reduction in consumer demand, the downward pressure on prices, and the deepening imbalance in the value chain and the credit crunch” said Javier Ojeda, Manager of Apromar. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Aquaculture debate tries to balance commercial versus public use

Commercial aquaculture farming is alive and well in Massachusetts waters.

This multi-million dollar industry continues to grow, and is reaping the benefits of support from environmentalists and politicians alike. But, as Mattapoisett has recently asked: Where do these commercial enterprises best fit its waters where unrestricted recreational boating, swimming, fishing, shell-fishing, and fowling has, for centuries, represented the common wealth of all people?

The town has, for the last year, been in the middle of a debate over how to regulate proposals for new commercial aquaculture farming in its waters. These proposals have been presented by educated and experienced locals. The controversial question is: Where should they exist? Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Thai Union may up shrimp prices due to ongoing floods

Thai Union Frozen Products Plc (TUF) is “closely monitoring” the flooding in Thailand’s southern provinces the country's principal shrimp farming regions, said TUF President Thiraphong Chansiri. Shrimp prices are expected to keep climbing due to a dearth of supply from the provinces.

President of the Thai Shrimp Association Somsak Paneetatyasai believes the floods could hamper production and drive prices up by five percent. TUF gets 60 percent of its shrimp supplies from farms in the southern provinces. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Mainstream Canada begins lawsuit

Mainstream Canada, Cermaq’s are pressing ahead with the lawsuit against Don Staniford for defamatory  and false and misleading remarks made by Mr Staniford. In a press release the companies said that for a number of years that certain environmental activists have been attacking their companies with false and misleading remarks.

Both companies, were mystified by the statement made by Staniford comparing fish farming to cancer. This remark was beyond logic and offensive to the employees, as well as to cancer sufferers .  Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Captive bred lobster produces 50,000 offspring a world first

At the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences (AIMS) in Townville, they were celebrating a worlds first. A captive bred lobster produced 50,000 offspring, this is a major step forward in developing lobster aquaculture in the future.

Dr Mike Hall said that in the past they have tried to get captive reaised lobster breeding without success. he went onto say that “This is gonna grab considerable interest around the world’. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers
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Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Using saltier water to eliminate bacteria in oysters

A new study carried out jointly by researchers at Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS)and oyster growers show that moving farmed oysters into saltier water prior to harvest virtually eliminates the bacteria that causes sickness in humans.

The results from this study reported by VIMS professor Kim Reece and Howard Kator and Thomas Gallivan, AJ Erskine, and Tommy Leggett (oyster growers) could offer a cost effective solution to a controversial change in the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations that will eventually affect the oyster industry in Chesapeake Bay. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.


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Salmon industry could deliver a major jobs boost

The burgeoning salmon industry could deliver a major jobs boost to the islands of the Minch thanks to a UK£40million (US$63.854 million) expansion program by Marine Harvest. Demand for Scottish salmon is growing by eight percent per annum, and is set to increase even more thanks to a historic trade agreement with China permitting imports of the fish.

And with an estimated 190,000 tonne under supply recorded for 2010, the need for expansion is growing. Some 15 open seawater sites in the Minch are currently being assessed by Marine Harvest as part of a the program, designed to up production by 20,000 tonnes per annum. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Finfish diseases In Asia-Pacific update

Speaking at the 9th Asia Regional Advisory Group (AG) on Aquatic Animal Health, Dr Siow Foong Chang (Intervet Norbio Singapore) presented updates on bacterial and viral diseases of finfishes in the Asia Pacific, in both marine and freshwater environments.

Based on passive surveillance, the common diseases in major commercial finfish farms in Asia include infections with Edwardsiella ictaluri, Flavobacterium columnare, Streptococcus agalactiae, Francisella spp, and iridoviruses (freshwater species), and Vibrio spp, Tenacibaculum maritimum, Streptococcus iniae, iridoviruses and nodavirus (marine species). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Tilapia to be farmed in Torrox, Spain

The Junta de Andalucia has authorised the town council of Torrox Municipality to intensively raise half a million copies of tilapia. The town of Torrox is focused on studying the farming of tilapia and marketing under an agreement between Torrox and Alua del Mar in Malaga.

The official said that tilapia farming will be held at the headquarters of the Autonomous Regional Development Organisation of Torrox. These facilities were expanded and renovated recently, and also house a school workshop and a Centre for Enterprise Development Support (CADE). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Foreign companies benefit from the problems of radiations in Japans seafood supply

As radiation is detected in Japans seafood supply, foreign companies may see increase demand for their products, Hong Kong’s Pacific Andes International Holdings Ltd and Norwegian companies Marine Harvest ASA, Cermaq ASA and Salmar ASA expect a possibly higher demand.

The Japanese nuclear plant operators Tokyo Electric Power Co has reported five kind of radioactive materiel was released by the damaged fuel rods from the Fukushima Daiichi plant and subsequently found in nearby waters. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Spain invests €5 million in Sturgeon farming

The center for breeding and fattening juvenile fish, Veta la Palma, of the Hisparroz group, has received grants worth EUR€5 million to raise three commercial sturgeon species originating in the Black Sea. Having obtained the agreement for breeding these species is the result of several years of working to overcome scientific and administrative controls.

Financial contributors are the European Union (EU), the Spanish Government and the Junta de Andalucía. According to the ecologist and environmental manager of these facilities, Miguel Medialdea, this project will increase the high value of fish production of Veta la Palma, which will be destined "to the most demanding international markets."

Moreover, it will serve for future European Atlantic sturgeon farming in order to reintroduce it into the river Guadalquivir. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.



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Tragedy in Japan opens opportunities for salmon industry

The disaster that recently hit Japan could benefit some sectors of the Chilean aquaculture and fisheries industry, and in particular, producers of coho salmon. "For what Japan is a tragedy, could become an opportunity for the national aquaculture industry," said the head of the Undersecretariat of Fisheries (Subpesca), Pablo Galilea,

After the earthquake and tsunami that occurred on March 11in Japan, "it opens the possibility not only for aquaculture production in Chile, but for other fish due to the high per capita consumption" that the Asian country has, said Galilea during the launch of new epidemiological salmon industry programs in the Region of Los Lagos. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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"Aquaculture in Asia-Pacific", published Market Report

Aquaculture in Asia-Pacific industry profile provides top-line qualitative and quantitative summary information including: market share, market size (value and volume 2005-09, and forecast to 2014). The profile also contains descriptions of the leading players including key financial metrics and analysis of competitive pressures within the market.

Essential resource for top-level data and analysis covering the Asia-Pacific aquaculture market. Includes market size and segmentation data, textual and graphical analysis of market growth trends, leading companies and macroeconomic information. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.


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Monday, March 28, 2011

India’s seafood exports to Japan will be hit for next 6 months

India’s seafood exports to calamity-hit Japan will be affected for next six months due to the prevailing situation there, according to industry bodies. A senior official of Marine Products Exports Development Authority (MPEDA) said many of the important cities other than Tokyo and Osaka in that country are still under duress and the lull in the Japanese retail market in devastated areas have forced exporters send small quantities.

MPEDA said during 2009-10 for the first time in the history of marine product exports, the earnings crossed US$ 2 billion (UK£1.249 billion). Japan, which accounts for more than 15 percent of the Indian exports of high-value seafood products during the first nine months of the financial year was placed third after the European Union countries and the US. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Redundancies at the institute of aquaculture, Stirling

Scotland, The Institute of Aquaculture at the University of Stirling has confirmed that they will be going ahead with making 17 staff at the Institute redundant. This move has sparked fury with students, staff and alumni of the Institute.

A spokesperson from the Institute has said that the redundancies will likely have a significant effect on both the teaching and also the research services that the Institute of Aquaculture can offer in the future to its worldwide clientele.

In a notice to staff, the University Principal Gerry McCormac, said that the difficult decision to make 17 members of staff redundant was due to continued financial losses facing the Institute. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Philippine: Agricultural Office Conducts Fisher Folk School

In its effort to address the problem on lack of appropriate technical knowledge on tilapia production in fishponds, the Provincial Agriculture Office (PAO) conducted a Fisher Folk School (FFS). Held at Barangay Burnay, the five-month activity seeks to adopt the FFS approach in transferring aquaculture technology through a participatory learning process over an entire culture period.

Nerisa Danao of the PAO said that the agriculture office was able to train 15 farmers in tilapia production in fish ponds and determined the growth performance of tilapia in terms of weight and length, survival rate, and return of investment. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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British Columbia salmon farmers big hit in Boston

Demand for British Columbian (BC) farmed salmon and interest in learning about developments in the BC industry kept BC Salmon Farmers Association members busy at this year's International Boston Seafood Show. Representatives from the association and their member companies were part of the three day seafood show that draws thousands of exhibitors and participants from 130 countries each year.

"There's a lot of interest in what's happening for the BC industry both on the operational side with the recent change in regulatory framework, but also because there is so much demand for our companies' products," said Mary Ellen Walling, Executive Director, BC Salmon Farmers Association (BCSFA). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Ronozyme approved for salmonids

Phytase enzyme Ronozyme P (L) from DSM Nutritional Products is now officially authorized for use in salmonid feed in the European Union. Ronozyme P (L) is a liquid preparation designed for easy incorporation in salmonid feed. It is the only phytase currently registered for salmonids (salmon and trout) in the EU.

Following approval for pigs and poultry (Commission Regulation (EU) No 171/2011) and positive safety and efficacy assessment of this product in feed for salmonids by the European Food Safety Authority, new authorisation for use in feed for salmonids has been granted according to Commission Regulation (EU) No 221/2011. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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New market research report: Aquaculture in Chile

Aquaculture in Chile industry profile provides top-line qualitative and quantitative summary information including: market share, market size (value and volume 2005-09, and forecast to 2014). The profile also contains descriptions of the leading players including key financial metrics and analysis of competitive pressures within the market. Essential resource for top-level data and analysis covering the Chile aquaculture market. Includes market size and segmentation data, textual and graphical analysis of market growth trends, leading companies and macroeconomic information.

The aquaculture industry is defined as the farming of aquatic organisms, including: freshwater fishes, marine fishes, diadromous fishes, molluscs and crustaceans. Farming implies some form of intervention in the rearing process to enhance production, such as regular stocking, feeding, protection from predators, etc. Farming also implies individual or corporate ownership of the stock being cultivated. Read more ...

 This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Canada’s fish and seafood exports grow by more than seven percent in 2010

Today, the Government of Canada officially released 2010 fish and seafood export figures and re-launched a new and improved www.sustainable-seafood.ca website. "Fish and seafood is Canada’s second largest single food export commodity," said Minister Shea. "Our government is working with all stakeholders to ensure the sustainability of our fisheries. Consumers can be confident that Canadian products are among the best in the world."

Canada’s fisheries are a valuable natural resource and a significant driver of our economy. Canadian fish and seafood products are exported around the world and generated more than CAN$3.9 billion (UK£2.494 billion) in export revenues in 2010, an increase of more than seven percent from 2009. "The increase in Canada’s landings and exports for 2010 demonstrates the trust consumers place in our products worldwide. We are proud of this industry and will continue to support it," added Minister Shea. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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US Catfish processing down 32 percent from last year

US Farm-raised catfish processed during February 2011 totaled 27.8 million pounds round weight, down 32 percent from February 2010. The average price paid to producers was US$1.00 per pound for February 2011, up 7.2 cents from last month and 23.8 cents above a year ago. Net pounds of processed fish sold during February 2011 totaled 15.6 million pounds, down 31 percent from the comparable month in 2010. Sales of fresh fish, at 5.23 million pounds, were down 36 percent from February 2010 and represented 34 percent of total sales.

Frozen fish sales, at 10.3 million pounds, were down 29 percent from a year ago and accounted for the remaining 66 percent of total fish sales. Sales of whole fish represented 18 percent of the total fish sold, fillets accounted for 61 percent, and the remaining 21 percent were mostly steaks, nuggets, and value added products. The total end of the month inventory decreased 19 percent from last month and was down 23 percent from a year ago. Read more ...

 This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Chinese demand fuels grouper investment

Taiwanese-raised grouper, a highly valued fish favored by local aquaculturists, have become a hot commodity that have caught the attention of investors in various industries. T C Chou, president of MiTAC-Synnex Group's investment arm Harbinger Taiwan, said Chinese consumers have adopted the Hong Kong habit of eating fresh grouper at banquets, creating a demand that has surpassed the annual supply of 50 million of the fish from Taiwan, Malaysia and Vietnam.

Harbinger has invested over NT$10 million (US$339,800) in Long Diann Marine Bio Technology Co, whose chairman, Tai Kun-Tsai, has been dubbed "the grouper king" for his advanced breeding technology and marketing strategies. Read more ...

 This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Tsunami and radiation may sink Japanese fishermen

The tsunami that slammed Japan two weeks ago wiped out homes, businesses and a fishing industry that was the lifeblood for thousands of victims on the northeast coast. The tsunami erased aquatic farms just offshore along with low-lying seaside areas that are home to fleets fishing along the coast, while a nuclear plant in Fukushima leaking radiation has raised concerns about marine life in the region over the longer term.

"Fishermen lost their gear, ships and just about everything. About half will probably get out of the business," said Yuko Sasaki, a fishmonger in the tsunami-hit city of Kamaishi. Sasaki has been cleaning the family store, where a water line at about five meters high marks where the tsunami struck. She expects to be back in business well before most fishermen from the area. Read more ...

 This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Friday, March 25, 2011

National Aboriginal Fisheries Forum

The Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Secretariat along with co-hosts - the Assembly of First Nations, the Aboriginal Aquaculture Association, the BC First Nations Fisheries Council and the Native Brotherhood of BC present the National Aboriginal Fisheries Forum at the Holiday Inn Harbourview in Dartmouth, NS. The event will take place from March 29 - 31, 2011.

John G. Paul, Executive Director of the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs Secretariat states "Together, we can improve the future economic success of the Aboriginal Peoples in the fisheries sector. Collectively, we can strengthen skills in marketing, product and market readiness while creating opportunities for economic development in the Aboriginal communities".

He further states "This event is designed to promote partnerships and collaboration between Aboriginal peoples and communities, federal and provincial governments and industry as a way towards a more economically prosperous, diverse and sustainable fisheries for Aboriginal people". Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Global aquaculture and fisheries industry report

This report analyses the worldwide markets for Aquaculture and Fisheries in Thousand Tons by the following Segments: Aquaculture, and Fisheries. The report provides separate comprehensive analytics for the US, Canada, Japan, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Rest of World. Annual estimates and forecasts are provided for the period 2007 through 2015.

A seven-year historic analysis is also provided for these markets. The report profiles 1118 companies including many key and niche players such as Kona Bay Marine Resources, Nireus S.A, Nutreco Holding N.V, Royal Greenland A/S, Sea Watch International Ltd, Selonda Aquaculture S.A, Starkist Seafood Company, Taylor Shellfish, Inc, TriMarine International, and Unima Group. Key Aquaculture Technology providers also discussed in the report include AKVA Group, Aquacare Environment, Inc, and Cyanotech Corp. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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The continuing saga of GE salmon: The science of bigger salmon

When regulators in Canada and abroad decide whether to allow genetically engineered salmon on the dinner plate, they'll be relying heavily on the research of a West Vancouver-based scientist.

Robert Devlin has been conducting risk assessments of GE salmon since 1989 at Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Center for Aquaculture and Environmental Research in West Vancouver , trying to answer the question of what would happen if the salmon were released into the wild. It's the only facility studying GE salmon anywhere in the world without commercial funds. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.


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MSU fish disease research point of pride

Catfish research at Mississippi State University is no surprise given that Mississippi leads the nation in catfish production, but the potential applications of that research through the College of Veterinary Medicine’s fish hatchery are another story.

As the state’s land-grant university, MSU conducts research that benefits this valuable aquaculture industry and consumers. While some of that research can take place in farm ponds, other studies require fish with known health histories. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Orego-Stim Increases Performance In Tilapia

Meriden's Orego-Stim has been proven to increase performance in the Tilapia supply chain. Commercial Malaysian aquaculture began in the 1980’s. In the last five years the aquaculture sector has recorded an annual growth rate of about 10 per cent year on year. It has now grown into a lucrative and sustainable industry, associated with the culture of high value species, mainly saltwater shrimp, marine fish and high value freshwater fish and shrimp.

Orego-Stim has proven itself to be an integral component for the advancement of responsible Tilapia aquaculture cultivation and has been shown to provide profitable benefits to all components within the production supply chain. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Florida Researcher gets award for Distinguished service

Researcher Professor John Scarpa attended the Aquaculture America 2011 to present his paper on oyster monitoring in Lake Worth Lagoon, but was surprised to recieve the award for Disinguished service to the industry of Aquaculture

“John is a researcher and an educator, and he devotes a great deal of passion to both roles,” says Harbor Branch-FAU Aquaculture and Stock Enhancement Program leader Dr. Megan Davis. “This award is a fitting tribute, and we are very proud of him.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Fish farm sues activist for defamation

A battle between anti fish farm group GAAIA and the aquaculture industry is going to the Supreme Court of BC over ads that have attacked the equate of farmed salmon with claims that its the same as cancer-causing tobacco. Mainstream Canada one of the largest aquaculture company is seeking damages for the false claims that the anti fish farm organisation has made in its ads

Mainstream Canada announced the lawsuit in a press release on Thursday, and Mr. Staniford responded by releasing a copy of a letter he sent to Mainstream’s parent company in Norway, Cermaq ASA, in which he says he welcomes the chance to debate the issue in court. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

Official for regulation of pangasius fish culture


Senior Executive of the National Fisheries Development Board (NFBD) V. Vasudevappa on Thursday highlighted the need for regulation of the pangasius fish culture to sustain growth.

Speaking at a Pangasius Fish Festival held here under the joint auspices of the Central Institute of Fisheries Technology (CFIT) and the NFBD, he expressed serious concern over the haphazard growth of Pangasius fish culturing across the State, leading to a price crash. As a result, the fish growers culturing this particular species were in serious financial troubles, he added. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

BAP certifies first pangasius facilities


On 14 March, QVD Aquaculture's farm and processing plant in the Dong Thap province of Vietnam became the Best Aquaculture Practices program's first two-star certified pangasius facilities. QVD Aquaculture is a vertically integrated business with seafood farms, factories and cold storage facilities. Its United States-based corporate team works with partners worldwide to deliver sustainably raised swai/pangasius and other seafood products to customers around the world.

"We congratulate QVD Aquaculture for being the first pangasius company to meet the rigorous BAP standards," GAA Executive Director Wally Stevens said. "Vietnam is an important region for aquaculture development, and the leadership that QVD Aquaculture has shown will, we hope, soon be emulated by other producers in Vietnam." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Salmon Farming & Free Speech!

The Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA), are preparing to fight a lawsuit from the Norwegian Government via a Norwegian owned companies Marine Harvest and Grieg Seafoods who now control 92 percent of British Columbia salmon farms. “Bring it on!” said Don Staniford, global coordinator for GAAIA.

“Where there’s smoke there’s fire or as they say in showbusiness ‘where there’s a hit, there’s a writ’.  GAAIA relishes the opportunity to prove in court that ‘Salmon Farming Kills’.  Cermaq are blowing smoke and are all smoke and mirrors when it comes to their claims of ‘sustainable aquaculture’.

Norwegian companies may have a monopoly on salmon farming but the Norwegian Government does not have a monopoly on the truth.  Salmon farming, like smoking, seriously damages public health, our environmental health and the health of wild salmon.  For the sake of our global ocean we need to quit salmon farming now and stub out farmed salmon from the face of the blue planet”.  Read more ...


This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Thursday, March 24, 2011

Bill to help farmed shellfish growers in Connecticut and across country

US Republican Joe Courtney is unveiling a bill that he says will help farmed shellfish growers in Connecticut and across the country. The Democrat from eastern Connecticut has scheduled a press conference Thursday at the Noank Aquaculture Cooperative.

Fellow US Republicans. Rosa DeLauro of Connecticut and Jim McGovern of Massachusetts are co-sponsoring the legislation, which allows the US Department of Agriculture to provide direct and professional marketing assistance to growers.

Local shell fishermen from Connecticut, Rhode Island and Long Island are expected to attend Friday's event, as well as Connecticut's new agriculture commissioner and other seafood industry officials. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Catfish farms going out of business

More and more catfish farms are drying up each year in Arkansas; the birthplace of catfish farming. According to the Director of the Department of Aquaculture, Tim McNulty said in 2004 there were 40,000 acres of catfish farms.  In 2010, it's down to 13,000. Catfish farmers are attributing the loss to high fish feed prices and competition overseas.

Lonoke County catfish farmer, Larry Raper has been in the industry for nearly 50 years. "They got cheaper labour and everything over there is cheaper. So, we can't compete with it," said Raper.  He said, "I enjoy just watching them eat and grow." When he retires he plans to pass his farm down to his son, Brian who said catfish farming may finish with his father.

"It's getting to be a big risk, there's so much money involved with it and I've been getting into sport fish a little bit," said Brian. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Stirling University to face 'protracted' strikes

Stirling University faces "protracted" strike action over plans to make 17 members of staff compulsorily redundant, union bosses have said. The University and College Union said it would ballot members over cuts at the Institute of Aquaculture, endorsed by the university's governing body.

The posts have been axed because of "continued financial losses" at the department, the university said. Union members are also planning strike action on Thursday over pensions. The union claims no university has ever made more than one or two individuals compulsorily redundant. And bosses said the Institute of Aquaculture was being targeted because it did not make a "surplus" in the university's internal budget process. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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National Cheng Kung University to transfer indoor grouper fingerling hatching technology

National Cheng Kung University (NCKU) in Tainan City and Taipei-based Merit Ocean Biotech Inc. signed a technology transfer license agreement to promote mass production of high-quality and disease-free grouper fingerlings in Taiwan on March 24th.

Grouper is the most valuable fish in Oriental fish market because of their flavour and rarity and it has been selected as the main development item of our national aquaculture program,” said Prof. Huey-Lang Yang, Director of NCKU’s University Center for Bioscience and Biotechnology.

“However, in Taiwan and neighbouring south Asian countries, grouper fingerling production has suffered a major catastrophe of severe viral infection resulted from the past intensive and careless farming behaviour.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.

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Controversial isles fish farm plan rejected

A contentious bid to establish a salmon farm close to four wild salmon river systems on Lewis was thrown out by Western Isles planning councillors on 22 March. More than 1,500 people opposed the plan to locate 12 huge sea cages in Broad Bay, Lewis, following a high profile vociferous campaign.

The Western Isles Council’s planning committee ruled that the environmental risks were too great and maintained the developer Scottish Salmon Company failed to have sufficient robust precautions to protect the environment. Fears were also expressed that the fish farm would not hold fast in a storm in the exposed site near the mouth of Broad Bay and lead to mass escapes of fish. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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Salmon cages do not harm the environment, experts say

A team of specialists at the Galician Technological Center for Aquaculture have found that no analysis or scientific study supports the motion that salmon farming in cages can harm the environment. The study was conducted by experts from the Cluster for Aquaculture of Galicia at the request of the Ministry of Marine Affairs, which is part of the Xunta de Galicia, following allegations made by fishing unions and groups of the estuaries of Muros and Noia.

According to industry members, the installation of cages is harmful to the estuary of Muros-Noia and can negatively affect wild fish and shellfish.

After reviewing the allegations as well as data from the Galician-Norwegian company North West Food - introduced in 2008 -, and after having completed a bibliographical review, the experts concluded that there is no analysis or scientific study to confirm that salmon farming in Muros could harm the environment, and to indicate that it is incompatible with the development of sea-related activities. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Aquaculturists, published and supported by the International Aquafeed Magazine from Perendale Publishers.
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